Upgrade: Gamma X-els

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by oldcity, Nov 26, 2013.

  1. oldcity

    oldcity Rookie

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    I was looking at this stringing machine as a possible upgrade from my pioneer dc plus. As I understand it, the old ES model was electric/spring controlled tensioner that required somewhere between 2-4lb tension loss after the initial pull before it re-pulled tension. the updated ELS model is reportedly an electronic load-cell (similar to the more expensive electronic models) that re-pulls tension at .5 loss. Are users finding that you are within .5 lbs of the reference tension? Also i was wondering if this table top machine can be mounted on one of gamma's stands. They don't specify this particular model will fit.
    thanks for any info.
     
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  2. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    I recently bought a Gamma Progression II Els, but I haven't used anything to check the exact tension that the machine is producing in comparison with its tension setting. I think that a tennis pal of mine has a Gamma tension calibrator that I can borrow soon. In any case, the machine constantly adjusts while pulling tension - it doesn't just pull to a certain point and then freeze - if that's what you're wondering.

    I'm pretty sure that the separate stand offered by Gamma fits both this Progression II as well as the Gamma X. There was a thread going around here recently about alternatives to buying a specific floor stand for a table top machine, too. One idea that I liked was getting a decent tool chest with casters (that hopefully lock), drawers, etc. That seemed like a pretty smart option, but for now I'm doing fine with my machine set on top of a desk.
     
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  3. oldcity

    oldcity Rookie

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    thanks for the reply. there was an older version, the (ES) that would pull tension but would require a significant drop in tension or stretch before it would pull again. the (ELS) is supposed to re-pull tension within a .5 loss in tension from stretching. that sounds good to me, just wondering if anyone had good results. I also heard good things about the brake design on this and the gamma X-els. I was also considering a 6004, but not sure of that brake design. tough call either way.
     
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  4. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    The brake design on the 6004 machines looks like the same one that's included on my Progression. The locking mechanism engages a couple of teeth into a large gear bolted under the table compared with more of a "friction" locking mechanism. I haven't used my locking mechanism to help with stringing something like a Prince O-port racquet, but it looks as though it would hold up just fine for that.
     
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  5. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    The brake would hold up I'm pretty sure but would the string stay in the rotational gripper at sharp angles.

    Also some food for thought - when string a racket normally there is more string to frame friction as as the string bends at a greater as you move away from the center. This means as you get to the outside strings (mains and crosses) there is less tension because of the friction. If you use a break all then tension is eliminated. This will cause a different feel in the racket. Maybe good maybe bad.
     
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  6. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Looks to me as though the string won't jump off the tensioner as long as it's feeding from the racquet (the edge of the O-port, etc.) at a gentle angle. The groove around the tensioner looks deep enough that the string would need to be at a rather heavy angle to jump off that drum. I don't use the brake myself for stringing the crosses in those racquets, but it looks like it should accommodate a mild angle to hold the cross in place for clamping.

    If I run into an issue there, I'll definitely report back. Just a thought here, oldcity. If you're worried about a cross feeding onto the tensioner correctly with the brake engaged, set the tensioner rate to a slower setting so that you can watch it wind onto the drum. If it doesn't go right and the tensioner isn't winding too fast, you can just hit the button again to reverse it before things go kerflooey.
     
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