USA: The South? The *******? West? Or some of the big cities?

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by TheMagicianOfPrecision, Jul 27, 2009.

  1. Thinking about moving to USA and start working as a tennis-coach. Ive got my greencard. I have gotten lots of offers. Im a former pro player ranked 1000 in the world. Any suggestions? (Preferely from Americans)
    Thanx!
     
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  2. brad1730

    brad1730 Rookie

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    For me, it normally boils down to... weather, water, mountains, economy, vibrancy of the town, and attitude of the locals. Do you like to see all 4 seasons, or is hot and hotter your 2 seasons? Do you like living near the oceans or lakes? Are the people laid back, outdoorsy types or are they hard-charging workers. Do you like big, middle or small cities? Are you familiar with our politics. Many people like living in liberal or conservative areas. Answer a few of these questions and I'll try to point you to a few cities. No matter what my opinion is though, there will be 10 people on here saying that I'm wrong, they live there, and it's just the opposite.
     
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  3. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    +1.

    In my area (Washington DC metro), I think it can be hard for tennis pros unless they affiliate with a club. The progression I have seen is that a new pro is hired by the club and is paid a pittance. As she becomes popular among club members who take clinics, she starts getting more clients. When the weather is too cold to play outside, she will teach through the club. Then when the weather warms, she can teach these clients outside in public parks and keep all of the revenue.

    I get the sense from my pro is that he makes his real money in the warm months and deals with less income in the winter. I get the idea that he wants to strike out on his own, but I wonder where he would get a steady stream of clients were it not for meeting new clients through the club.

    Others can probably give more info on this angle, but that's what I know about it.
     
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  4. Thanx Brad,
    Oh yeah, no matter what you write some pl are always gonna talk you down.
    You mentioned great things that i really havent thought of...
    Id like when the temperature is around 70-80 F...Hate the winter,we have enough of that in Sweden. Id like to live near a coast...Im oretty laidback so i would like that, when ir´t comes to politics i am not all into american politics...is day i would want some place not to conservative and not to liberale...I loved NYC,but i also really liked Louisville,Kentucky and Akron,Illinois. I guess that represents Huge medium and small citys right there...Hard to decide
     
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  5. I see, well thank you, it works that way in some clubs in Sweden aswell.
     
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  6. cak

    cak Professional

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    Cindy made a good point about the weather. I know our tennis pro gets no lesson income in bad weather. Those with indoor courts need to pay for the court time to teach. So you might start in an area where the weather allows outdoor playing year round.
     
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  7. Thats actually a great ides...so we are talking? Florida? Californis? Georgia? Alabama? Arizona? Texas?
     
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  8. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

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    I have a friend who's a golf pro up in Minnesota. He always complains about how the weather interupts his business up there. I'll ask him why he doesn't move down here and he says that teaching golf pays better up there. So who knows? Also, up in Minnesota, most of the tennis is played indoors, so weather isn't a factor.

    The head guy at the Chandler Tennis Center is Norwegian. He might have some perspective what would be good. Here's a link.

    http://www.chandleraz.gov/default.aspx?pageID=664
     
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  9. Thanx a lot!
     
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  10. Gemini

    Gemini Hall of Fame

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    I recommend either the South (primarily Florida) or Southern California if choosing just based on favorable weather for teaching, but I would also look at areas that have high concentrations of registered players. I live in Atlanta, GA and there are TONS of players here of all skill levels. The weather here is favorable most of the year.
     
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  11. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Another point is that bad weather may make income seasonal or unpredictable, but it is not necessarily an impediment to earning a living. My own pro has a mortgage, two cars, a non-working wife and one child. He has health insurance through his job at the club. His income may have its ups and downs, but he seems to be doing just fine.

    If another area has a ton of tennis pros, the competition may be such that it could be difficult to earn a living wage even if the sun shines 365 days a year.
     
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  12. tennisnoob2

    tennisnoob2 Rookie

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    its basically down to what climate you like. Every state and somewhere near a metro area has an indoor court/facility. Remeber, the closer you are to the city the more you get paid. If you wanted all year weather south California would be good. Texas, Florida, Louisiana, all get hit by hurricanes so that could affect a lot of playing time(summer-fall)
     
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  13. "Texas, Florida, Louisiana, all get hit by hurricanes??:shock: Oh...regularly or once every 10 year...?:confused:
     
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  14. conditionZero

    conditionZero Rookie

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    At least one of those gets hit pretty much every year, some years more than once. (Don't leave out Mississippi and Alabama.) But most places are subject to either hurricanes, blizzards, earthquakes, tornadoes, etc. So pick your poison. As least you can see hurricanes coming.
     
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  15. tennisnoob2

    tennisnoob2 Rookie

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    ^^yes. on a regular basis from about july-november(maybe october?). Yes mississippi and alabama too, but they arent a prime location for tennis.

    I would expect to see a couple hurricanes every year. 1 or 2 being a higher level. Multiple tropical storms/depressions.

    South cal is prime real estate, but you pay the price for it.

    The northeast is pretty safe with no huge natural disasters(as long as you dont mind snow, which you've probably seen in sweden.) New York, Boston area, and Jersey are pretty good(they pay top $$$ for everything)
     
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  16. I see,very interesting and facinating, i love USA...been there 3 times, NJ seems like a nice place,is it? NYC...to work in NYC you better live outside the city right? Ive hears that the prizes for condos and apartments are incredibly high?
     
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  17. conditionZero

    conditionZero Rookie

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    You'll get plenty of that winter that you hate in those places.
     
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  18. tennisnoob2

    tennisnoob2 Rookie

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    yea dont live in the city. nj is nice in certain places, just dont go south jersey. Connecticut is better priced i believe and its right between nj and new york. Its also a decent ride to boston.
     
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  19. South Jersey is dangerous,no?
    Connecticut better prized than NJ? You mean cheaper to rent a place there?
     
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  20. SretiCentV

    SretiCentV New User

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    Don't move to Miami. It rains every day here!
     
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  21. Are you serious or joking?:confused: Sunshine state right...?
     
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  22. tennisnoob2

    tennisnoob2 Rookie

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    some parts are dangerous, its just not big on tennis there. I would say connecticut is cheaper. and it has a little bit of everything, cities, country side, and suburbs.

    Nj is pretty expensive, just watch out for any city in new jersey(paterson,newark,irving, elizabeth are pretty dangerous)

    I would stick to north nj because its easy to get anywhere out of state and there is a high amount of tennis clubs and courts.
     
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  23. Perry the Platypus

    Perry the Platypus Rookie

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    You might also give some thought to middle America. Kansas City, St. Louis, Oklahoma City, Tulsa and Dallas all have very active tennis scenes, are big enough places to have a nice social life, have nice weather and have relatively low cost of living.
     
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  24. I see,very interesting,thank u!
     
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  25. tennisnoob2

    tennisnoob2 Rookie

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    perry, doesnt kansas city or oklahoma city get tornados?

    http://www.mnhs.org/preserve/shpo/disaster/images/tmap.gif

    lol

    edit: you should look into arizona. Its like a desert.It gets hot but theres no humidity. Nice cities like flagstaff, phoenix, tucson They have a lot of tennis clubs and tournaments there.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2009
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  26. brad1730

    brad1730 Rookie

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    I think you have a good idea of the weather. I live in Colorado, and while it does snow, it isn't as cold as people think. But while we have the mountains and rivers, we're short on oceans. My pitch for Colorado.

    Most large cities will have a cosmopolitan mix of people, and usually aren't as bent to 1 direction (liberal/conservative) as smaller cities. For example, Boulder is very liberal, while Colorado Springs is known for being conservative. Denver is a little liberal, but is so big that no one label fits.

    Larger cities will have more crime, but it's not rampant. You need to know where to go and not go - especially at night. If you've been to most large European cities - you have probably developed a sense of when/where it is safe. Same thing applies here. I wouldn't get drunk in downtown Denver, and walk home alone on Colfax Avenue - but that isn't hard to figure out.

    Most of these cities, have smaller suburbs that are like small cities. These are attractive because they feel like a small city, but you are close to the big city. You can go see the Rockies (baseball) in Denver, and drive back to your home in Littleton.

    My personal favorites would be California or Texas. While I like Florida, the humidity would kill me. Colorado has dry air and few bugs. Texas can be sizzling hot in July or August, but the rest of the year is great. The people are proud of their state and have always been very friendly when I've visited. California is known for being liberal, but they are very laid back and you can't beat the Pacific ocean! Be careful though - California has a wide variety of cities. Do your homework on weather, etc.
     
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  27. SretiCentV

    SretiCentV New User

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    It's the sunshine state because they say it's the sunshine state and housing prices never go down because realtors say so too.

    I am partially serious about the rain though since it rains 95% of the time from May to September. The rest of the year is pretty good I guess.
     
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  28. amarone

    amarone Semi-Pro

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    I second Atlanta. It has way more tennis than any other city in the US. For a Swedish connection, Mikael Pernfors used to be a pro at The Racquet Club of the South - I don't know if he still is.
     
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  29. tennisnoob2

    tennisnoob2 Rookie

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    ...houses are cheap down there, except for miami

    ^^^^atlanta does not even compare to so cal(the un-deny-able tennis capital of the usa)

    ny metro would be next(along with the prices and cost of living
     
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  30. I see, but there isnt many tennisclubs on Manhattan right? I would imagine that Queens got many? And Brooklyn?
     
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  31. tennisnoob2

    tennisnoob2 Rookie

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    well if you are looking for a nice club, i wouldnt go in the city for two reasons

    Rates- In america they charge based on when you use it. This can either be for winter or a certain number of months. Clubs can charge membership for up to about 3,000 a year(not sure if they charge trainers,but this is how it is for players). Then you have to pay on top of that for court time. Sometimes the club also controls the rates you have to charge seeing as you are using their courts. New york always is the most EXPENSIVE state in every catorgory. They have the highest sales tax(8%?) and one of the highest income taxes.

    Location-the city is a hell hole to get to by car, you have parking garages that are extremely expensive. So you would want to live in the city by the club.

    btw r u looking to rent or buy?

    I would go look at connecticut(you can drive Nj,NY,Boston in about 3 hrs) or boston . Connecticut is also the headquarters of Head tennis lol

    here are some real estate sites, they are nation wide

    http://www.weichert.com/

    http://www.remax.com/

    http://www.century21.com/
     
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  32. OrangePower

    OrangePower Hall of Fame

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    I am biased, but...

    The San Francisco bay area might be something to look into. Good weather all around - not too hot, not too cold. On the coast and generally a very scenic area.

    Tennis-wise, you can play outdoors year round and not too many days lost for rain. Lots of clubs and also lots of public tennis courts. There is an active tennis community.

    San Francisco and the bay area is very cosmopolitan, so there would not be as much of a culture shock as maybe other areas of the USA. Depending on what you prefer, you could live in the city itself to get the big city experience, or else if you prefer things quieter, there are many nice communities around the bay.

    The biggest down side would be the high cost of living here. So getting started might be financially tough. But on the other hand, you can charge and earn more than in many other areas. So once you build up a client base you might actually end up better off than in a 'cheaper' place.
     
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  33. WhiteStripes

    WhiteStripes Rookie

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    Having lived seemingly all over the country (DC, NC, NYC, Cali, and seemingly everywhere in between), I'll definitely say tennis-wise, there's nothing quite like Southern California for a tennis player -- if for nothing else, solely because of the weather. Florida (and other tennis hotbeds in the South like Atlanta and Houston) may be warm year-round, but it can get brutally hot and humid. And as another poster mentioned, there always seem to be a risk of a damn storm every day.

    SoCal (where I live now), on the other hand, you're getting sunshine and close to average 70 degrees year round if you're near the coast. Little humidity. And it seemingly never rains here. Lots of public courts. Lots of private clubs. Lots and lots of tennis players. NorCal is nice too, but a bit cooler, and it rains a bit more. Like Orange said, biggest downside to Cali is the high cost of living.
     
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  34. dennis10is

    dennis10is Banned

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    I would second what you say but you left out

    Earthquakes. I've been through all the decent sized one since the 80's. Some people freak out about them but I miss them now that I'm living in NY.

    Potentially long commute. This is not specific to So Cal, Atlanta, NY, Boston etc.. can all be horrible but I think So Cal and NYC are the worse.

    The OP may have to live in a small apartment, save his money so that by the NEXT housing crash he'll be able to afford a house.
     
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  35. The Wreck

    The Wreck Semi-Pro

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    Hilton Head, SC. If you are a serious tennis pro, I would say this is the ideal place.

    But if you are looking for a more city-like environment with access to the coast or lake, then the metro Atlanta area is a thriving tennis community where you could surely find work.
     
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  36. stanfordtennis alum

    stanfordtennis alum Hall of Fame

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    i would recommend either texas or arizona for best year-round tennis weather
     
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  37. IceNineTX

    IceNineTX Semi-Pro

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    I live in the Houston, TX area there is never an off season. Winters have a few days here and there where it's too cold to play, but generally during Nov-Feb, you just need to throw on a light long sleeve shirt for evening tennis. Summers are hot and humid, but that doesn't stop anyone from playing.

    Hurricane Ike knocked out our club for about a week, but that's mainly because it was shutting down in 2 months time anyway. It could have been just a couple of days. But before 2008, the last hurricane was like 25 years prior.

    We have our share of rain, but it's usually manageable and dries fast.

    I do hear great things about Atlanta, too.
     
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  38. pmerk34

    pmerk34 Legend

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    Stay in Sweden where you get free health insurance.
     
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  39. I hear a lot of talk about health-insurance, i know that healthcare is expensive in USA but doesnt your employe provide you with health-insurance for free??
     
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  40. conditionZero

    conditionZero Rookie

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    There goes this thread...
     
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  41. pmerk34

    pmerk34 Legend

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    Stay in Sweden.
     
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  42. Why are you saying that?
     
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  43. pmerk34

    pmerk34 Legend

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    Because this country has nothing to offer you. Tennis isn't popular here. You get the best health care in the world and have the highest standard of living in Sweden.
     
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  44. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

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    It's a class issue. The legend of Europe around here goes that it's a Utopia. Supposedly: no crime, no energy problems, mass transit, and 'free' healthcare. Being glad of living in America to them suggests that you're naive, at the very least, while dissin' everything American implies that one is well-traveled and has a degree of sophistication.

    Someone like you puzzles them. Why would you leave paradise and like it here? For example, why leave Sweden and 'free'* healthcare? But you're right, most jobs provide it, and even if you don't have it, emergency rooms will always supply it.

    *I put 'free' in quotation marks because many Americans are unaware of the high taxation rates in Sweden. The manner of paying is different, but governments really cannot make things "free".
     
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  45. pmerk34

    pmerk34 Legend

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    The tax rates here suck. Stay in Sweden.
     
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  46. conditionZero

    conditionZero Rookie

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    You just can't pass up the chance to bash America, can you? We got it, you hate America, America sucks, etc., etc.

    Magician, don't worry about that nonsense. One of the good things about the USA is that life here can be whatever you want to make it. The diversity is astounding. You can be a beach bum, country boy, coon ass, city boy, cowboy (my personal favorite)... Live in the mountains, desert, hot, cold, rainy, dry... Whatever you want, you can have it here. You can even be a pretencious America hating snob in Long Island.

    Back to your original question:
    Youve gotten a lot of input, so I'll just add this - any where along the gulf coast you can find year around tennis, but the heat and humidity can be brutal. 95 degrees with the humidity can be suffocating. I live along the gulf coast and during the summer the tennis scene actually slows down. In the middle of the day, even on weekends, the courts are often deserted. That more or less includes Louisiana, Mississippi, parts of Texas, Alabama and Florida.

    Wherever you decide, I'm sure you'll be welcomed. Let us know when you get here.

    P.S. Whether your employer or the government pay for you health insurance, there's absolutely nothing free about it.
     
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  47. I see, thank you very much, i didnt mean to stir up any bad emotions or anything...Why would an American hate America? Every country has its downsides im sure, ive traveled all over Europe, iven been to Asia 2 times,South-America and Australia, but i liked USA the most...once gain,thank u.
     
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  48. I see,very fascinating...thank u very much.
     
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  49. Wakenslam

    Wakenslam Rookie

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    Atlanta has some HUGE advantages for tennis players and pros. Our tennis season is 10-12 months, depending on how much you can stand chilly weather. We are 6 hours from the Gulf of Mexico, and 6 hours from the Atlantic. We have a TON of tennis players here of all age levels and abilities. Not only do we have USTA, but we also have ALTA (altatennis.org) If you're married with children there's plenty to do. The singles scene is also excellent. The economy and cost of living are really good here....... I can't think of any reason not to live here! SoCal is nice, but try buying a house there. The prices are CRAZY!!! In the Atlanta suburbs you can buy a 2800 square foot home with all the bells and whistles for under $200k.
     
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  50. Thank you! Lots of ppl have mentioned Atlanta, Yes i am single,29 years old, former pro-player...ill look up some clubs in Atlanta...
     
    #50

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