Useless information thread

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by forzainter, Oct 17, 2007.

  1. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    In honor of Cinco de Mayo, Moe's Southwest Grill offers a special on every fifth of each month...any burrito, chips and salsa and a soda for $5.00. I prefer The Homewrecker...steak, black beans and rice with all the toppings including guacamole and sour cream. Yummy!
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2013
  2. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    The Woman with 60 dogs


    The woman with 60 dogs - Indian Express

    Pratima Devi's shanty opposite the PVR Anupam Complex in Saket can easily be missed. The 60-year-old is often mistaken as an old woman who only befriends dogs and shares the roof with 50-60 of them.

    However, a few minutes into the conversation with her, all pre-conceived notions are erased and the "kutton waali amma" becomes just "amma" (mother).

    For the past two decades, amma has been taking care of all the strays in the complex, spending her negligible income on their food and medication.

    As one approaches her shanty, her dogs alert her of the presence of strangers rousing her from her daily siesta. A closer look inside and one sees wooden beds laid out for dogs, jute gunny bags on the floor to keep the puppies warm, big utensils, a steel bowl for water and a thin stick by her side. "This is my family. I have children of my own but I won't live with them. My son tried for months to make me leave from here but I didn't budge. I haven't gone back to my village in seven years. Who will take care of them if I leave?" she says.

    It was in the 1980s that amma shifted to Delhi from Nandigram, and worked as a help at actor Rahul Dev's home and soon after opened a tea stall in the complex.

    "I used to have a dog in the village too — Tony. And when I used to work the tea stall, I used to keep feeding mathis and fen to the strays and one day one of them delivered a litter. I picked three — Sheru, Jhumki and Kaali. Parivaar badta raha aur yeh sab inki hi family hai (The numbers just increased from there... these are all of the same family) ," she explains.

    Those who know of her often leave abandoned or injured puppies and dogs at her doorstep, assured that she will take good care of them.

    "I can't say no to them. Some people love families, some love money but I love dogs. Earlier, I used to earn Rs 2,000 a week but now I am old and have high blood pressure, but we manage somehow," says amma, as she plays with Gaurav and Sweety, the new puppies of the family.

    For the past 10 years, amma was a ragpicker. She made her living with whatever money she got from selling the bits and pieces, which she salvaged from garbage bins. Often strangers come and help her as some donate food while others give away mattresses or money for the dogs.

    Now, a 20-something Ramesh helps her out. He was a member of NGO Circle of Animal Lovers till a few weeks ago. He left the NGO to help amma take care of the dogs. Irrespective of the financial crunch, amma is very particular about the quality of food that she feeds the dogs and their vaccination as well.

    Even if I don't have food, I ensure that my dogs are fed 5kg of rice and meat every day," she says. Apart from the 50-plus dogs that live with her, Amma goes around feeding some 200 dogs in the complex twice a day.

    Like the Pied Piper, they follow her around. "You know, if a new ragpicker comes around the complex, they alert me and chase him away," she says with a laugh.

    http://www.indianexpress.com/news/the-woman-with-60-dogs/1085753/0
     
  3. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    It's a little late to point out that yesterday, 3/14, was "Pi Day"...you know, that magical number 3.14159...

    Happy Pi Day, belatedly!
     
  4. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Gordo Taqueria on Telegraph Avenue in Berkeley makes pretty good burritos. Unfortunately, they do not make pies.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I seem to have a cold/flu, which I suspect resulted from a flight from SFO to LAX, or hotel room contamination. The gestation period would be too short for the return flight to be the culprit.
     
  6. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    German players Lisicki and Kerber have the biggest and thickest leg muscles I have seen on WTA players. Petkovic had almost no body fat on her ripped six pack in her prime. Germany must have an unusual weight training program for WTA players.
     
  7. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    While living in Germany as a teenager, I developed Popeye-forearms from lifting many a liter-sized beer mug! What these girls are using to develop their legs may be slightly different.
     
  8. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Could be from a stray kiss, too :)
     
  9. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I successfully dodged Anna's kiss,
    [​IMG]

    but Maria's kiss was right on target...
    [​IMG]
     
  10. BarNotchky

    BarNotchky New User

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  11. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    You flu a long way to get that ;)

    Listening to Swan Lake, what a wonderful piece. Great composers, the Russians.
     
  12. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Stravinsky's Riotous 'Rite of Spring'

    MILES HOFFMAN and RENEE MONTAGNE
    March 21, 2008

    Igor Stravinsky's ballet The Rite of Spring (Le Sacre du Printemps) is often held up as a masterwork that changed modern music forever. Music commentator Miles Hoffman takes the distinction one step further.

    "The Rite of Spring," Hoffman says, "represents one of the greatest creative leaps in not only the history of music, but in the history of the arts."

    Stravinsky's music is famous for causing a riot at its premiere. It was a warm spring evening in Paris on May 29, 1913, and Hoffman says the well-heeled crowd at the Champs Élysées Theatre was not ready for jagged rhythms, crunching discord, and the strange jerking of the dancers on stage.

    "The ballet was choreographed by the great Nijinsky," Hoffman says, "and the noise, fighting, and shouting in the audience got so loud, he had to shout out the numbers to the dancers so that they knew what they were supposed to do."


    One shrewd musicologist wrote that "the pagans on stage made pagans of the audience."

    Hoffman says that the idea of pagans is right on the mark.

    "The subtitle of The Rite of Spring," Hoffman says, "is 'Pictures of Pagan Russia,' a celebration of pagan rituals that eventually leads to a sacrifice of a chosen young woman to propitiate the gods of spring. It's not what you call a happy tale."

    The shock of the new, in 1913, quickly gave way to a warm embrace. More performances of The Rite of Spring followed close on the heels of that famous first night, and by the 1920s, it was played in the U.S. In the 1940s, the infamous piece gained a permanent place in pop culture when Walt Disney used part of it as the soundtrack to Fantasia. Today, The Rite of Spring remains a classic, but it also still packs a punch.

    "It's a shocking piece," Hoffman says. "It's still startling to us today when we hear it, but it is not a confusing piece. It's compelling. We're hearing irregular rhythms, we're hearing instruments asked to go to the extremes of their capability, but we're also hearing patterns that we recognize, with pacing, contrast, fascinating harmonies, continuity — all the basic principles of what makes a piece of music work are all there. And that shows us the secret of Stravinsky's genius."

    "It liberated many composers," Hoffman says, "and there were many imitators. I don't think you can listen to modern movie music without sooner or later hearing the influence of Stravinsky and the Rite.

    "I like to think of this piece as a celebration of creativity, period. A new music is born, and sometimes births are violent."
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=88490677
     
  13. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Of the Russians, Tchaikovsky is my favorite. Any stories or incidents about him?

    ^ Thanks for the piece. I've got Firebird Suite somewhere here.
     
  14. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Tchaikovsky would have had no chance against Tolstoy in tennis. Tursunov would be bamboozled by Tolstoy's tennis skills as well.
    [​IMG]
     
  15. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I looked out a window this evening, and there was a raccoon eating an orange, which had fallen from a tree in my back yard. The raccoon looked very content.
     
  16. Dedans Penthouse

    Dedans Penthouse Hall of Fame

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    * Raccoons' tails can make up 52% of their lenght, up to 405 mm.
    (which ain't diddly-squat compared to Bulgakov's much cooler lemur).

    *Raccoons climb with great ease and are not bothered by a drop of 35 to 40 feet! A truly amazing raccoon fact!

    * Did you know?
    Former First Lady Grace Coolidge kept a pet raccoon named Rebecca. Grace would often make her available to the President who (to the delight of the First Lady) .... would stroke and pet Grace's furry little female critter for hours on end.

    :shock: ---"oh calvin!...rebecca's arriving again!!"
     
  17. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    yes, but did ol' Calvin take his oath of office after Harding's death on Gideon's Bible??? Rocky Racoon met his match...
     
  18. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I was once wandering home with an Icelandic woman in Skagen, and we passed a hedgehog that seemed oblivious to us. When we walked by the hedgehog, I yelled, "It's chasing us; let's run!"

    She knew I was joking, but we ran!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  19. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Listening to Shostakovich's Leningrad.

    Takes me back to childhood. Dad used to love this, he was obsessed with Russia and Marx/Lenin.
     
  20. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    A CRITIC AT LARGE
    RUINED CHOIRS
    BY ALEX ROSS
    MARCH 20, 2000


    A CRITIC AT LARGE about Dmitri Shostakovich... In 1936, Shostakovich was twenty-nine years old, and he was the brilliant young man of Soviet music. His First Symphony, which he completed at the age of eighteen, had been taken up by orchestras around the world. He had dedicated himself—industriously, if not enthusiastically—to works on Communist themes. His first opera, a setting of Gogol’s “The Nose,” typified the impertinence of art in the early Bolshevik years, and his second, “Lady Macbeth,” was hailed—before Stalin saw it—as the prototypical Soviet music drama... After Pravda denounced "Lady MacBeth, Shostakovich lived the next two years of his life in a state of abject fear. Pravda’s denunciation of “Lady Macbeth” coincided with the beginning of the Great Terror, and Shostakovich was immediately declared “an enemy of the people.” He is said to have slept in the hallway outside his apartment, so that when the N.K.V.D. came to take him away his young family would not have to witness the scene. He finished his Fourth Symphony, a surreal, desolate piece in a Mahlerian vein, and withdrew it when cultural officials warned him that he was still on the wrong path. In April of 1937, he set to work on a new symphony, in a simpler style; two months later, Mikhail Tukhachevsky, a Marshal of the Soviet Union, who had been a supporter and friend of Shostakovich’s for many years, was shot for his part in a nonexistent conspiracy. As the N.K.V.D. rounded up Tukhachevsky’s circle, Shostakovich was called in for questioning. In an impeccably Gogolesque turn of events, the composer found that his appointed interrogator had been arrested, and that no one else was interested in his case.When the Fifth Symphony had its premiere, in November of 1937, it sent the audience into convulsions. During the third movement, the proudly sorrowing Largo, many broke into tears. The ovation afterward lasted for forty minutes. Shostakovich, once pegged as a propagandist for the Soviet system, is now exalted as its noblest musical victim. He has been canonized as a moral subversive, a conscientious ironist, a “holy fool.” Shostakovich...made an art of saying nothing memorable in public. After any performance of his music, he would declare, “Brilliantly done.” When he was shown something by another composer, he would say, “A remarkable work.” He mastered Soviet doublespeak, and artfully mocked it in his correspondence: “1944 is around the corner,” he wrote to his friend Isaak Glikman. “A year of happiness, joy, and victory. This year will bring us much joy. The freedom-loving Peoples will at long last throw off the yoke of Hitlerism, and peace will reign throughout the world under the sunny rays of Stalin’s Constitution. I am convinced of this, and therefore experience the greatest joy.”Shostakovich suffered under the Soviet system, but so did many other people. After a point, the fact of oppression fails to justify his actions. In the late sixties and early seventies, Shostakovich did write many works in which resistance to authority was a running theme: the texts of his vocal works spoke of poets murdered by tsars, rebels dancing on the scaffold, exiles expressing the conscience of a country. In his Fourteenth Symphony, he set a poem by Apollinaire entitled “The Zaporozhian Cossacks’ Answer to the Sultan of Constantinople,” in which the “evil butcher of Podolye” is denounced in tones distinctly reminiscent of the Scherzo from the Tenth Symphony—the piece that “Testimony” calls a “portrait of Stalin.” But such music was more the projection of a dissident career than the enactment of one. He wrote his first string quartet in 1938, in the wake of the Fifth Symphony, and the quartet medium became for him a refuge from the anxiety of symphonic public speaking. In the new realm, he could explore the technical limits of his musical language, which is based on an intricate array of Russian modal scales, and also test the psychological limits of his narratives, in which seemingly simple and innocent ideas are revealed as their opposites.
    http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2000/03/20/2000_03_20_124_TNY_LIBRY_000020460
     
  21. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    ^ Wow.. thanks a lot for that piece, Comrade Bulgakov ! (lol, that reminds me, .. my Dad used to call me Comrade when i was a kid).

    What other composers and/or works would you suggest, Mike ?
     
  22. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Prokofiev is worth listening to, in my opinion.
     
  23. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I like the Radwanska sisters. They always seem to be having fun.
     
  24. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Any particular works or symphonies/ concertos of Prokofiev ?

    Was listening to Swan Lake today, such amazing stuff people have composed.
     
  25. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    ..........
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  26. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    I wasn't aware they are fans of Lauper!:twisted:

    I actually prefer Ravel..."Bolero" has inspired me many times since viewing "10"!
     
  27. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Girls Just Want To Have Fun

    Flash Mob: Roskilde Naked Race For Beer.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2013
  28. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    From YouTube:

    Uploaded on May 27, 2011

    As one of the first professional symphony orchestras ever, Copenhagen Phil (Sjællands Symfoniorkester) did a flash mob at Copenhagen Central Station on May 2nd 2011, playing Ravel's Bolero. Conductor is Jesper Nordin.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrEk06XXaAw
     
  29. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    VIDEO: In Copenhagen, A Very Classy Flash Mob On The Metro

    by EYDER PERALTA
    May 07, 2012 2:41 PM
    The Copenhagen Philharmonic has tried its hand at a flashmob before. Back in May, it performed Ravel's Bolero to an unsuspecting public at Copenhagen Central Station.

    It was nice. But, earlier this month, they were truly audacious, performing Edvard Grieg's Peer Gynt on a moving, crowded metro train. As you'll see in the video below, it looks magical:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=gww9_S4PNV0
    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way...penhagen-a-very-classy-flash-mob-on-the-metro
     
  30. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Aki Kaurismäki has not always portrayed Finns in a positive light.
     
  31. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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  32. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Listening to The Blue Danube and other works of Strauss. So beautiful, wasn't the Blue Danube used in 2001 when they show that shuttle thing rotating ?
     
  33. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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  34. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Quanjude restaurant in Beijing is known for its Peking duck. I once went there with a group of people, but I did not try the Peking duck. I do not eat ducks.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2013
  35. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I prefer observing living animals in my yard to finding dead ones on my front doorstep. For the second time in around five years, I found a dead opossum next to my front door. On a positive note, this is better than finding a horse's head in my bed.
     
  36. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    ^ what does the autopsy report reveal ?
     
  37. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I did not file a police report, though animal control removed the dearly departed. The opossum looked to be fit with no signs of trauma. Maybe its family will demand an autopsy report! I prefer not to think about dead opossums at the front door, or the message that this might send.
     
  38. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    My imsonia was rewarded this early morning when I tuned in unexpectedly to an episode of "Live From Daryl's House" broadcasted on a local TV station. Apparently, Daryl Hall has been putting together a series of webcasts from his home for several years, inviting in various artists that he sits down with and plays some awesome music together. This show featured a Canadian band named "Finger Eleven". Their session with the blue-eyed king of soul was an excellent half-hour of musical fun!
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2013
  39. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Insomnia is the title of a film by Norwegian director Erik Skjoldbjærg.
     
  40. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Insomnia was totally eradicated by the AO final 2011.

    However, the final triggered an epidemic of narcolepsy which scientists are hoping Andy Murray and Ferrer will be able to cure with their exciting style of play
     
  41. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    When counting sheep in order to induce sleep, I usually don't make it to 95!:twisted:
     
  42. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I do not like adjusting to new time zones after long flights.

    A Battle Plan for Jet Lag

    By STEPHANIE ROSENBLOOM
    Published: August 15, 2012

    THERE are more so-called remedies for jet lag than there are time zones, from long-standing antidotes like No-Jet-Lag’s homeopathic tablets to new innovations like the Valkee Brain Stimulation Headset, which was tested earlier this year by Finnair and purports to alleviate jet lag by channeling bright light into the brain through the ear canal.

    Yet some of the latest (and perhaps most effective) jet-lag solutions are being developed for people who fly to places most of us never will. The fatigue management team at NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston helps astronauts — who, for training purposes, must fly frequently among international space agencies in Russia, Japan and Germany — overcome jet lag two to three times faster than other travelers. And while the anti-jet-lag plans that the team prescribes are highly individualized, the general principles can be simplified for the bleary-eyed rest of us.

    As anyone who has ever flitted across multiple time zones knows, when your internal clock is unable to adapt to a rapid change in the light-dark cycle, the result is jet lag. Read: fatigue, moodiness, gastrointestinal unpleasantness. In a perfect world, everyone would take preventive measures — like preparing for a trip to Paris from Washington by going to sleep earlier and earlier each night a few days before the flight. But most of us spend the days before a vacation frantically trying to polish off work and make sure the plants and pets won’t die while we’re gone.

    And so below are steps you can take to minimize jet lag, from the moment you board the plane through your first night in a far-flung destination.

    1. Understand that the direction you are traveling makes a difference.

    “It’s only in the past 100 years that we’ve been able to jump time zones,” said Steven W. Lockley, a consulting member of NASA’s fatigue management team, who is also a neuroscientist specializing in sleep medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard in Boston. “We haven’t evolved a way to adapt yet.”

    There are, however, ways to cope. Begin by determining whether you are traveling east or west. Most people (three quarters of us, according to Professor Lockley) have an internal body clock that makes it harder for them to travel east. So, while most of Florence, Italy, is sleeping, a tourist from New York is wide awake and itching to climb the Duomo because it’s barely time for dinner back on the East Coast.

    Even within the United States, traveling east over just three time zones can be taxing: a study led by Dr. Lawrence D. Recht, a neurologist, of 19 Major League Baseball teams using season records from 1991 to 1993 showed that the team that had just completed eastward travel would give up more than one run than usual in every game.

    If you’re traveling east and want to adapt to the new time, you will have to wake up earlier and go to bed earlier than you normally would. This is known as advancing your body clock. If you’re traveling west, you’ll have to adapt to the new time by waking up later than usual and going to bed later than usual, delaying your body clock. Easier said than done. So how does one do this as painlessly as possible?

    2. Schedule when to expose yourself to light and when to avoid it.

    It takes about a day to shift one time zone, said Dr. Smith L. Johnston, a flight surgeon and the chief of the fatigue management team at NASA. To do it faster, you must regulate your exposure to light — both natural and artificial — and darkness. Yes, there are all kinds of jet-lag cure-alls on the market, but experts say that since light is the primary environmental cue telling your body’s clock when to sleep and when to wake, controlling jet lag is fundamentally about controlling light and darkness.

    With that in mind, here are the general guidelines: if you are traveling east, you must expose yourself to light early, advancing your body clock so that it will be in sync with the new time zone. Conversely, if traveling west, you should expose yourself to light at dusk and the early part of the evening, delaying your body clock so that it will be in sync with the new time zone.

    This may be best understood with an example. Let’s say that at 7 p.m. you board a plane in New York that is scheduled to arrive in London at 7 a.m. local time (when it’s 2 a.m. in New York). You’re traveling east, which means you need to advance your internal clock toward London time. To do that, avoid any kind of light during the flight because the exposure will delay your body clock rather than advance it. An obvious (albeit odd) way to accomplish this is to wear sunglasses in the plane. That’s what Professor Lockley and his colleagues do despite the fact that they are flying at night. “People think you’re a rock star,” he said.

    Typically, when travelers arrive in London at 7 a.m. they attempt to get on the new time zone right away. “Which is exactly the wrong thing,” Professor Lockley said, because your internal clock is still set to New York time, and trying to adjust too quickly will only exhaust you. What you need to do is to ease yourself into the new time zone by consciously manipulating your exposure to light. So keep those sunglasses on.

    “I’m the only person wearing sunglasses at Heathrow,” said Professor Lockley, who, in the London example, would recommend wearing sunglasses for the entire flight, and once off the plane, until 11 a.m. London time (6 a.m. New York time). Throughout the rest of the day, seeing light will help you to be more alert and to reset your internal clock to local London time. (For those who want to get granular, the new book “Sleep: A Very Short Introduction,” which Professor Lockley co-authored, provides details about which hours of the day exposing yourself to light or darkness will be most beneficial to overcoming jet lag.)

    If you are able to sleep during the flight, even better. Astronauts and mission-control personnel have used eye masks, earplugs and sleep aids like Ambien to help them doze, Dr. Johnston said. But he cautioned travelers who want to take a sleeping pill to check with their doctor first and to avoid taking any medication with alcohol. Many airline passengers “just get drunk and pass out,” he said, underscoring that a hangover does nothing to alleviate jet lag.

    Those who want to take synthetic melatonin because it might induce sleepiness during a flight should also consult a doctor first to find out if it is safe for them. Furthermore, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention caution, synthetic melatonin is not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Now, if you were to take a morning flight instead of an evening flight to London from New York, you would want to expose yourself to light throughout the flight (no need for sunglasses), as well as when you land in London, soaking up as much sun as possible all day. “You can have exactly the same trip but the advice is opposite depending on what time you’re taking the flight,” said Professor Lockley, who has also used these principles to help racehorses acclimate to new time zones. “Once you understand the timing issue you can go through that process for any trip.”


    3. Survive the first night by eating right and preparing the hotel room for a good night’s sleep.

    Whatever you do on your first day, remember that the things capable of upsetting your body when you’re at home can be even more troublesome when traveling. For instance, some of us know that alcohol may help when it comes to falling asleep but that it can interrupt later stages of sleep, which would only exacerbate jet lag. Large or spicy meals should also be avoided in the evening at your destination, Professor Lockley advised, because the body is not as efficient at metabolizing food at that time.

    At night (and for each night of your London trip) about an hour or so before bed, keep the lights in your room as dim as possible. Close blinds or curtains and cover any light from a clock, computer, television, even your smartphone, because light can make you more alert and reset your internal clock to the wrong time, making you think the day has begun.

    More tips on improving sleep at home or on the road are available at Harvard University’s “healthy sleep” Web site, healthysleep.med.harvard.edu/healthy/getting/overcoming/tips. Just don’t log on before bedtime.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/19/travel/a-battle-plan-for-jet-lag.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
     
  43. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Jet lag is the worst. I agree Mike B.


    RIP Coach Jack Pardee.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/sport...4bc664-9b28-11e2-9219-51eb8387e8f1_story.html

     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2013
  44. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    ^ Time is all relative, guys. With all the inter-stellar travel i have done, at relativistic velocities, believe you me guys, I am off not by hours but years. Whose time is right? Who is to tell ?
     
  45. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    You sit on a window sill waiting for the next class, typing a post regarding Nadal, you see a girl you like out the window, looks out and smiles childishly, then you look back at the phone and realizing that you made a ton of typos. I love windows.
     
  46. Dedans Penthouse

    Dedans Penthouse Hall of Fame

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    Hoppar inte!

    ;)
     
  47. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I like pistachios.
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  48. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    One of my favourite days in Stockholm was on a first warm, sunny day in spring. It seemed like everyone was outside, contentedly sitting, while facing the sun. It was like a city of lizards, recharging in the sun after a cold night.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2013
  49. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I recently found over three thousand French francs in a concealed pocket of a rarely worn Burberry trench coat purchased in the 1990s. I find this annoying.

    France's former currency is devalued to zilch
    Hundreds line up at the Bank of France in Paris on the last day to convert old francs to euros. Nostalgia and doomsday predictions are in the air.

    February 17, 2012
    By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times

    Reporting from Paris — Amateur collectors worked the crowd for limited editions, warning against giving away potentially valuable bills. One doomsaying politician called for a return to the discarded currency. And people of all ages waited patiently to turn in their forgotten, worn-out francs.

    A decade after being pushed aside by the euro, the franc on Friday officially became a relic.

    It was the last day to exchange old currency for euros, and the event attracted hundreds to the Bank of France in Paris, the only location in the capital able to convert the colorful bills.

    "A page in our history has turned," said Michel Gagnepain, 63, who got just 10.67 euros for his 70 francs but who had shown up to be part of the historic moment. "I'm glad I came. There's a little folklore that comes with being here. After this, it's over."

    Like many others waiting for fresh euros, Gagnepain had kept a few francs at home as keepsakes after they were no longer accepted as legal tender in stores.

    By Saturday, most of the estimated $723 million worth of francs remaining in the world will be nothing more than pretty pieces of paper, monetarily speaking.
    http://articles.latimes.com/2012/feb/17/world/la-fg-france-franc-20120218
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2013
  50. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Mount Fuji: Japan’s Most Famous Mountain
    Fast Facts About Mount Fuji

    By Stewart Green, About.com Guide

    Mount Fuji, with an elevation rise of 12,388 feet, is the 35th most prominent mountain in the world. It has a circumference of 78 miles and a diameter of 30 miles. Its crater is 820 feet deep and has a surface diameter of 1,600 feet.

    Mount Fuji is called Fuji-san (富士山) in Japanese. The origin of Fuji's name is disputed. Some say it derives from the Ainu language used by the Japanese aboriginal people and means "everlasting life." Linguists, however, say that the name is from the Yamato language and refers to Fuchi, the Buddhist fire goddess.

    The first known ascent of Mount Fuji was by a monk in 663. After that the peak was regularly climbed by men, but women were not allowed on the summit until the Meiji Era in the late 19th century. The first known Westerner to climb Fuji-san was Sir Rutherford Alcock in September 1860. The first white woman to ascend Fuji was Lady Fanny Parkes in 1867.

    Mount Fuji is an active stratovolcano with a towering symmetrical volcanic cone. The mountain formed in four phases of volcanic activity which began 600,000 years ago. Mount Fuji's last eruption occurred from December 16, 1707 to January 1, 1708.

    Fuji-san has long been a sacred mountain. The native Ainu revered the great peak. Shintoists consider the peak sacred to the goddess Sengen-Sama, who embodies nature, while the Fujiko sect believes the mountain is a being with a soul. A shrine to Sengen-Sama is on the summit. Japanese Buddhists believe the mountain is the gateway to a different world. Mount Fuji, Mount Tate, and Mount Haku are Japan's "Three Holy Mountains."

    Mount Fuji is the most climbed mountain in the world with over 100,000 people trekking to the summit every year. Unlike many sacred mountains, people make pilgrimages to climb the peak. About 30% of climbers are foreigners, with the rest Japanese.

    Mount Fuji, one of the world's most beautiful mountains, is Japan's most popular attraction. It's loved for its beauty and symmetry, and has been painted and photographed by generations of artists. Springtime is perhaps the most beautiful time of the year to see Fuji. The snow-covered mountain is framed by pink cherry blossoms, giving Fuji the name Konohana-Sakuahime, which means "causing the blossom to brightly bloom."

    Mount Fuji is 62 miles (100 kilometers) from Tokyo, but from Nihonbashi in Tokyo, which is the zero mile marker for Japanese highways) the distance by road to the mountain is 89 miles (144 kilometers). Fuji can be seen from Tokyo on clear days.

    Mount Fuji, in Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park, is Japan's most famous mountain and symbol. Five lakes--Lake Kawaguchi , Lake Yamanaka, Lake Sai, Lake Motosu and Lake Shoji--surround the mountain.
    http://climbing.about.com/od/mountainclimbing/a/MtFujiFacts.htm

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