Useless information thread

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by forzainter, Oct 17, 2007.

  1. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    30,251
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    ^ Awesome !

    Which city is that so close to Fuji-san ? I'd love to have such views from my office and home. Don't tell me that's Tokyo, I've been there a dozen times (in the 90's) and never saw Fuji-san from there!
     
  2. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    12,961
    Location:
    In a sureshsian vortex
    ^^^Senti, you're slipping...Tokyo's Shinjuku skyline is highly distinctive and appears, with the compression effect of a telephoto lens, to be right next door to Fuji-san, even though the mountain is 100 km away. I've seen the same photo effect in pictures of the Seattle skyline and Mt. Rainier.
     
  3. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    30,251
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    ^ That was in the 90's mon freund. I remember Shinjuku, iirc there was a famous Tower Records store there. Or was that Ginza.

    I've been struggling to remember the name of one place i used to go to work, outside Tokyou, about 90 mins by metro. Old age does that.
     
  4. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    12,961
    Location:
    In a sureshsian vortex
    thanks for going all Franco Prussian on me, mio amico!

    It's not the "old age" affecting you...much has happened in Japan since your stay. The "giveaway" in the photo is the cocoon-shaped tower, one of the world's most beautiful pieces of architecture, built in the '00's.
     
  5. Dedans Penthouse

    Dedans Penthouse Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,066
    Location:
    Antarctica
    Few (if any)

    can rock it on the Psaltery like Margaret Bradford!!


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
  6. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,639
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    [​IMG]

     
  7. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    12,961
    Location:
    In a sureshsian vortex
    ^^^The punch by Cooper inspired one of Ali's better quotes..."He hit me so hard, that my ancestors in Africa felt it!"
     
  8. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    623
    Location:
    The Future
    Discover the History of the Sandwich
    Tori Avey | January 3, 2013

    The Oxford English Dictionary defines a sandwich as “an item of food consisting of two pieces of bread with a filling between them, eaten as a light meal.” Seems like a simple enough concept. So, who came up with this innovative way of serving food? While I’m sure the Earl of Sandwich would like all the credit, the true history of the sandwich goes back much further.

    Most of us have heard of the fourth Earl of Sandwich, otherwise known as John Montagu. In the late 1700’s, French writer Pierre-Jean Grosley recounted his observations of English life in a book called Londres (translated to English under the name A Tour to London). In the book, a few lines were written that forever tied this food invention to the Earl of Sandwich:

    A minister of state passed four and twenty hours at a public gaming-table, so absorpt in play, that, during the whole time, he had no subsistence but a piece of beef, between two slices of toasted bread, which he eat without ever quitting the game. This new dish grew highly in vogue, during my residence in London; it was called by the name of the minister who invented it.

    While it is not clear if this anecdote is completely true, the book gained popularity and the story took hold. Soon the name was official—when you ate two pieces of bread with something in the middle, you were eating a “sandwich.”

    Edward Gibbon, author of The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, is credited with being the first person to write down the word “sandwich” using its modern culinary context. On November 24, 1762, he wrote in his journal:

    That respectable body, of which I have the honour of being a member, affords every evening a sight truly English. Twenty or thirty, perhaps, of the first men in the kingdom, in point of fashion and fortune, supping at little tables covered with a napkin, in the middle of a coffee-room, upon a bit of cold meat, or a sandwich, and drinking a glass of punch.

    During the time this journal entry was written, Gibbon was First Lord of the Admiralty. The Earl of Sandwich, Montagu, was entrenched in London’s social scene. It’s possible that Montagu introduced the sandwich concept to his high society London friends, including Gibbon, who helped it to gain quick notoriety. In 1773, the word sandwich was used in a recipe for the first time, in Charlotte Mason’s cookbook, titled… now, stay with me here. The Lady’s assistant for regulating and supplying her table: Being a Complete System of Cookery, Containing One Hundred and Fifty Select Bills of Fare. That’s the condensed version of the title, if you can believe it.

    Though the Earl of Sandwich (or, perhaps, his cook) deserves credit for helping sandwiches gain a name and popularity, variations of the concept have been around for centuries. It’s difficult to pinpoint exactly when or where they first appeared. Farm laborers in rural France had been eating meat between sliced bread long before it had a name, though the sandwich likely started even earlier than that. The earliest recognizable form of a sandwich may be the Korech or “Hillel sandwich” that is eaten during Jewish Passover. Hillel the Elder, a Jewish leader and rabbi who lived in Jerusalem during the time of King Herod (circa 110 BC), first suggested eating bitter herbs inside unleavened matzo bread. The herbs symbolized the bitterness of slavery, and the bread resembled the flatbreads made in haste by the ancient Israelites as they fled Egypt. Hillel’s simple recommendation of sandwiching the two foods together may indicate that this was already a popular way of serving food in the Middle East.

    Sandwiches first appeared in American cookbooks in 1816. The fillings were no longer limited to cold meat, as recipes called for a variety of things, including cheese, fruit, shellfish, nuts and mushrooms. The years following the Civil War saw an increase in sandwich consumption, and they could be found anywhere from high-class luncheons to the taverns of the working class. By the end of the 19th century, sandwiches earned new names for their many different forms, like the triple-layered “club sandwich” and the corned beef “Reuben.”

    In the late 1920s, when Gustav Papendick invented a way to slice and package bread, sandwiches found a new audience. Mothers could easily assemble a sandwich without the need to slice their bread, and children could safely make their own lunches without the use of a knife. The portability and ease of sandwiches caught on with families, and the sandwich became a lunchroom staple.

    The Earl of Sandwich’s legacy lives on today in more than just the name. John Montagu’s great-great-great-great-great-great grandson Orlando Montagu founded a chain of sandwich restaurants called—what else?—Earl of Sandwich. The menu features an homage to the Earl’s first, most famous sandwich called the “Original 1762.” The sandwich includes hot roast beef, sharp cheddar, and creamy horseradish sauce served on warm bread.

    Sandwiches are now popular all over the world, and it seems like every region has their own take on the concept. In Cuba, restaurants serve ham and cheese on Cuban bread. In the Middle East, falafel or shawarma in a pita pocket is the fast food of choice. In France, a Croque Monsieur or Croque Madame can be found in most cafes. In Italy, simple and rustic panino sandwiches are the norm. In New York, pastrami on rye is king, though the Reuben takes a close second. In Philadelphia, it’s all about the cheesesteak. Sandwiches come in endless varieties, making them one of the most popular foods worldwide.
    http://www.pbs.org/food/the-history-kitchen/history-sandwich/
     
  9. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,639
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Carnitine and TMAO

    See: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/08/h...rit-in-heart-disease.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

     
  10. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    623
    Location:
    The Future
    Interesting posts, borg number one. Also, I wish Mount Fuji was as close to Tokyo as the telephoto effect suggests.

    In my opinion, Chinese restaurants in the United States use too much oil and sugar in most dishes. Even in San Francisco's Chinatown, a fluent Mandarin or Cantonese speaker ordering from the Chinese menu at a good restaurant will lead you to cuisine much closer to what you would find in China at a quality restaurant.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2013
  11. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,639
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2013
  12. Dedans Penthouse

    Dedans Penthouse Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,066
    Location:
    Antarctica
    Nobody rocks the Pipes of Pan like ZAMFIR, master of the Pan Flute!!

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    30,251
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    The 1975 film Tubby the Tuba marked the first time that computers were used in the production of an animated feature.
     
  14. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    623
    Location:
    The Future
    I really enjoy toasted seaweed (nori) as a snack.
    [​IMG]
     
  15. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    12,961
    Location:
    In a sureshsian vortex
    Call me spoiled by living in NYC where the pizza is an art form so I don't typically like any of the chain offerings. However, Domino's new pan pizza is pretty good stuff when in a pinch. Tonight I had part of a Hawaiian (ham/pineapple) pan pizza while on break at work. Twasn't too bad!
     
  16. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    30,251
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    Tell Woody and Robert I said Hi.
     
  17. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    623
    Location:
    The Future
    Yes, this an old article, but I find it useless and amusing.

    Moscow mayor wants to ban snow from the city
    The mayor of Moscow has announced a draft plan to stop snow from falling within the city limits.
    [​IMG]

    7:00AM BST 07 Sep 2009
    Yuri Luzhkov wants snow banished from Moscow in winter to save money and improve the standard of living. He is proposing to use cloud-seeding to encourage snow to fall in the countryside surrounding Moscow, leaving the city's skies clear.

    Mr Luzhkov noted that city authorities already used such techniques to break up rain clouds and guarantee good weather on important public holidays, such as the annual May 9 parade celebrating victory in the Second World War, the Times reports.

    "Why don't we keep this snow outside the Moscow city limits?" he said.

    "For the countryside, this means more moisture and bigger harvests.

    And for us, less snow." Russian newspapers reported that the idea had provoked panic among residents in outlying regions, worried that they would be flooded out of their homes. Vladimir Litvishkov, a land management official, told reporters: "On those holidays when they clear the clouds over Moscow the surplus precipitation becomes a problem for us." A snowless mid-winter Moscow might sound absurd, but Mr Luzhkov has had a habit of getting his way since he was elected in 1992.

    His programme to manage the weather would cost only a third of the amount spent on snowploughs and round-the-clock clearance operations.
    City authorities send 2,500 snowploughs into action to clear snow, and employ an army of 50,000 workers to clear Moscow's streets and pavements after a blizzard.

    As many as a dozen cargo aircraft are sent into the skies over Moscow before major public events, scattering silver iodide, liquid nitrogen and cement powder into rain clouds to encourage precipitation.

    However, scientists warned that cloud-seeding throughout the winter could have serious environmental consequences.

    Winter in Moscow typically lasts from October to March, although recent years have seen unusually mild weather which some have blamed on global warming. A sudden snowfall in October 2007 caught the authorities by surprise and resulted in 3,200 car accidents in two days.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...ow-mayor-wants-to-ban-snow-from-the-city.html
     
  18. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    30,251
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    Tsonga's birthday today.
     
  19. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    12,961
    Location:
    In a sureshsian vortex
    Nice touch by M-C, giving him a day off to celebrate!
     
  20. Dedans Penthouse

    Dedans Penthouse Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,066
    Location:
    Antarctica
    April 17, 1894

    Today is Nikky Khrushchev's birthday!!


    "I will bury your ass Thom McCann!!"
    [​IMG]
     
  21. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    623
    Location:
    The Future
    [​IMG]
    Pair of Nikita Khrushchev's shoes.

    No, this is NOT the pair that he wore at the United Nations on October 12, 1960 (after his death his family threw it out by mistake) but another pair with which it had been confused. Sergei Khrushchev subsequently learned that his father had sent a bodyguard to buy a pair of American shoes more appropriate for the unexpectedly warm weather.
    http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...en&gbv=2&tbm=isch&itbs=1&sa=X&ved=0CEIQrQMwCw
     
  22. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    30,251
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    I wonder what became of Imelda's two thousand shoes !
     
  23. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    12,961
    Location:
    In a sureshsian vortex
    Did George Bush keep the ones thrown at him???
     
  24. Dedans Penthouse

    Dedans Penthouse Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,066
    Location:
    Antarctica
    A centipede ran off with them.


    GWB: "Iran off with them"
     
  25. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    12,961
    Location:
    In a sureshsian vortex
    Nope, he opened a branch of (I)raq Room Shoes!:)
     
  26. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,639
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    See: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/17/business/report-on-us-meat-sounds-alarm-on-superbugs.html?src=recg
     
  27. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    623
    Location:
    The Future
    When the Beatles visited Rishikesh, India, Ringo Starr brought a suitcase full of Heinz beans with him.
     
  28. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,639
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    That's true Mike B. Ringo Starr couldn't tolerate spicy food due to a childhood case of peritonitis, which is an "inflammation of the peritoneum, the thin tissue that lines the inner wall of the abdomen and covers most of the abdominal organs."

    See: http://www.beatlesbible.com/1968/03/01/ringo-starr-leaves-india/

    [​IMG] (Ringo above the Ganges River)

     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2013
  29. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    623
    Location:
    The Future
    Ironically, a local Indian shop is my source for Heinz beans. I like the British variety that is made with tomato sauce, which is not usually available in American supermarkets. I buy freshly made samosas at the market every now and then, along with items like hot lime relish, and make sure to buy cans of British Heinz beans with tomato sauce.
     
  30. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    12,961
    Location:
    In a sureshsian vortex
    The drumming Lad of Liverpool still owes me...more than 50 years ago young Mr. Starkey borrowed my surname and as of yet hasn't paid me a single cent in royalties.
     
  31. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,639
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Cool. Beans are a great source of protein (lentils in general like chick peas included). Vegetarian samosas are one of my favorite foods in the world! They are so good. I can't survive without spicy food lol..

    [​IMG]
     
  32. Dedans Penthouse

    Dedans Penthouse Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,066
    Location:
    Antarctica
    -

    Beans or legumes originated from a wild variety in eastern Assia around 6,000 BC in what is now Nitrogenia.



    Beans, beans are good for the heart,
    the more you eat 'em, the more you fart,
    the more you fart, the better you feel,
    so eat your beans at every meal.

     
  33. Dedans Penthouse

    Dedans Penthouse Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,066
    Location:
    Antarctica
    double post - sorry
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2013
  34. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    12,961
    Location:
    In a sureshsian vortex
    I'm a big fan of green bean casseroles, especially as part of the holidays meals. I like to make it with French-cut string beans and I almost double up on the amount of French's crunchy onions for the topping. It goes great with either turkey (Thanksgiving) or standing rib roast (Christmas).

    On New Year's, pork and black-eye peas (tell me they're not beans) are a traditional Southern dish to be consumed to insure peace, health and prosperity throughout the year. This is also a favorite of mine!
     
  35. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    623
    Location:
    The Future
    ^^^
    Now I have a craving for Szechuan-style garlic green beans, made very hot and with no meat.
    [​IMG]
     
  36. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,639
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    A Somber Spring Night in Boston

    [​IMG]

    See: https://twitter.com/Cmdr_Hadfield/status/323937819414384641/photo/1


    See: http://www.latimes.com/news/science...13-photos-from-space-20130422,0,2465762.story
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2013
  37. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    30,251
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    ^^ I caught on at Nitrogenia :)

    You guys seem full of beans today !
     
  38. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    623
    Location:
    The Future
    I prefer Carlsberg Elephant Beer to Albani Giraf Beer. I apologize to any giraffes that take offense.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  39. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    12,961
    Location:
    In a sureshsian vortex
    Elephants, giraffes...I don't care just as long as they don't drink my Yuenglings!

    P.S.: My beers have eagles adorning the containers!
     
  40. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    30,251
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
  41. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    12,961
    Location:
    In a sureshsian vortex
    $2.50 off on a 12-pack enticed me to try Budweiser Black Crown...a nice crisp 6.0% amber lager. I compare it favorably with Yuengling, my regular pre-sleep pal.
     
  42. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    623
    Location:
    The Future
    Don't forget Anchor Steam Liberty Ale.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2013
  43. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    623
    Location:
    The Future
    This list is about ten years old, but it is a good compilation of films that are worth seeing.

    The New York Times Best 1,000 Movies Ever Made
    This list comes from the second edition of “The New York Times Guide to the Best 1,000 Movies Ever Made,” edited by Peter M. Nichols.
    http://www.nytimes.com/ref/movies/1000best.html
     
  44. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    30,251
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    [FONT=arial, sans-serif]STORM THORGERSON AND THE END OF ALBUM ART[/FONT]



    [FONT=arial, sans-serif]The death last week of Storm Thorgerson at the age of sixty-nine was both the end of an era and the reminder of the end of another era. Thorgerson was one of the premier rock-album designers of the seventies. His company, Hipgnosis, worked with dozens of artists, including Led Zeppelin (“Houses of the Holy,” “Presence”), T. Rex (“Electric Warrior”), and Peter Gabriel (the first three eponymous records), but they’re best known for their work with Pink Floyd: Thorgerson and Hipgnosis created the cover for the 1973 album “The Dark Side of the Moon,” first and foremost, but also “Wish You Were Here” and “Animals.” The Pink Floyd connection stretched back into childhood: Thorgerson was a classmate of both Syd Barrett and Roger Waters, and he was later the best man at David Gilmour’s wedding.[/FONT]

    [FONT=arial, sans-serif]The story behind the cover of “The Dark Side of the Moon” is as unassuming as it is legendary: Thorgerson supposedly brought seven different designs to the band, who looked them over and, after a few minutes, pointed at the prismatic triangle. As the album became a classic-rock monolith, remaining on the Billboard chart for more than seven hundred weeks, the cover became an icon of classic rock—and of modern commercial art—in its own right. Here, in a short interview, Thorgerson discusses some of his most famous creations, including the “Wish You Were Here” cover, which was wrapped in black plastic to obscure the design.[/FONT]

    [FONT=arial, sans-serif]Thorgerson’s death is a reminder of a larger transition in popular music: the fact that the visual accompaniment has changed drastically. During the nineteen-fifties and early nineteen-sixties, the dominant language for LP cover art was portraiture. The vast majority of Frank Sinatra albums, for example, show Sinatra’s face, sometimes photographed, sometimes illustrated, with an eye toward the mood of the music. Some labels began to change the language of the LP cover, most notably Blue Note, which, under the direction of Reid Miles, used close-up, atmospheric photography (often by label co-founder Francis Wolff) and stark, bold graphic design. Things changed again in the late sixties, when Peter Blake created the high-concept cover for the Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” and even legitimate Pop artists like Andy Warhol supplied covers or concepts for bands like the Velvet Underground and the Rolling Stones. Thorgerson and other top designers of the seventies (Peter Corriston, for example, who was perhaps the most innovative of all, with his die-cut work for Led Zeppelin’s “Physical Graffiti” and the Stones’ “Some Girls”) built on the backs of these innovations, and they paved the way for New-Wave and post-punk starts like Peter Saville.[/FONT]

    [FONT=arial, sans-serif]That’s an incredibly incomplete pocket history of pop album covers, yet it still includes at least six big names whose work will persist for decades. It would be difficult to find even half that many important album designers now. This is not to say that there are not gifted visual artists working with rock artists, or bands who foreground visuals. John Baizley, the lead singer of the superb heavy-metal band Baroness, furnishes the artwork for his group and others. Gorillaz, initially a collaboration between Damon Albarn and the comic-book artist Jamie Hewlett, has always had a strong visual identity—in fact, you could argue that the band exists mainly as a set of illustrations that enable music.[/FONT]

    [FONT=arial, sans-serif]But the centrality of album design to the process of making pop music has diminished considerably over the years. The reasons are simple enough. As the LP gave way to other formats, first the cassette and then the CD, the canvas available to visual artists shrank. The CD was especially ruinous to visual creativity. Longboxes, the cardboard sleeves in which discs were initially packaged—in part to allow retailers to reuse the same bins in which they had stocked LPs—were dismissed as environmentally unfriendly and phased out by the early nineties. The jewel boxes that replaced them had unfriendly clear plastic covers that came from assembly lines and tabs that made it difficult to remove liner-note booklets. And the more recent move from physical products into the entirely virtual world of downloads has driven an additional, final nail into the coffin of cover art, both by deëmphasizing the album in favor of singles and by reviving the need for simple portraiture: in an online retail environment, where display space is often postage-stamp-size, what’s often most important is to simply show the face of the artist. There are always exceptions—Phoenix’s “Bankrupt!,” released this week, has a nicely conceptual cover image of a sliced peach—but they are increasingly uncommon.[/FONT]

    [FONT=arial, sans-serif]Last week was also the celebration of Record Store Day, which was an opportunity for bands to sell bespoke singles and one-off collaborations at higher prices to soft-hearted customers. I have gone on the record as being a skeptic regarding the holiday. But Record Store Day is an opportunity to remember a time when the process of listening to an album was not only aural, but also visual and even physical, and to confirm that such a time is no more. What is the solution? Technology moves these days toward portability and away from physical presence. The notion of being anchored to large square objects, even beautiful ones, seems preposterous. And while there are Web sites like the Album Art Exchange that preserve and share high-quality versions of cover artwork, they feel like they’re holding onto a past that will never again be the future. The worst part about the death of album art is that it’s not even a new death anymore. Music has buried album art and visited its grave regularly for more than a decade. But as other industries face similar evolutions—what will book design look like if and when the transition to e-books proceeds apace?—it’s worth both lamenting the passage of album covers and conceding at the same time that lamenting their passage can seem curmudgeonly, unintelligent, nostalgic, and sad.

    http://www.newyorker.com/online/blo...rgerson-pink-floyd-dark-side-of-the-moon.html
    [/FONT]
     
  45. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    623
    Location:
    The Future
    While Maria's grunts use to seem organic and coordinated with contact on her shots, I noticed that they were delayed at the Porsche final against Li Na. She would often hit her shots in silence and then grunt from just before the ball crossing the net until the bounce, or even until the point of contact. This seemed like a calculated tactic.

    I like Maria, but view this as cheap gamesmanship that should not be allowed. Maybe she is learning tactics from Vika.
    [​IMG]
    Soundwave clips of Victoria Azarenka, left, and Maria Sharapova, right, showing the decibel levels of their respective shrieks. Sharapova's reaches 105 decibels and Azarenka's 95, but the Belarussian's has a longer duration. Photograph: Guardian
     
  46. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    12,961
    Location:
    In a sureshsian vortex
    ^^^Remind me never to book a hotel room next to either of them!
     
  47. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2010
    Messages:
    7,685
    Location:
    Sweden
    Was the word "****" banned?

    Turns out it was.
     
  48. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    30,251
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    One word has recently started appearing with stars. So yes, being starred means banned :D
     
  49. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    12,961
    Location:
    In a sureshsian vortex
    If you mention the stroke that follows a fault, you must use the improper form (2nd instead of second)...otherwise the autocensor kicks it out and leaves asterisks in their place.
     
  50. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    623
    Location:
    The Future
    Why was the word "Rafa" banned? Was it a silent ban?
     

Share This Page