Useless information thread

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by forzainter, Oct 17, 2007.

  1. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    What next :shock:

    Will they ban usage of "Noel", "Fred" and "Ralph" too ?!
     
  2. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    One of my dogs, the big one who had got run over as a pup two years back, just got his neck stuck in my gate. The gate has some weird patterns and as a pup also he used to get his neck stuck in between, trying to get in.

    I had a long struggle but his head/skull would keep coming in the way and at the last moment he would push his head out again, he is trying to push himself out whereas we were trying to pull him back.

    Finally, called the nearby hospital to send someone to sedate him. Then went back to trying. At one point he let out a short yelp or scream just as we almost got him out, and then we had to start again.

    This time without even trying his head just came out ! It was so quick with almost no effort, i still don't know how it happened.

    He ran away rather ungratefully :D but then i gave him some water (its sunny and awfully hot outside), reassured him. He's sitting across the road right now looking like an aggrieved party at a police station.

    Nowadays it's very hot here, so he and his mother and one step-sister sleep under parked cars all day. Then at night they come out and prowl our lane barking at everyone and creating a ruckus.

    I've been getting a lot of complaints of late. The little sister (one year old) climbs onto cars at night, scratching the bonnet. Then they get into houses and steal new slippers and shoes and chew them beyond recognition.
     
  3. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Next? Sureshs! :shock:

    Sentinel, I always enjoy hearing about your dogs. You seem to have many adventures, good and bad, with them.
     
  4. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    The Swedish police uses mysql for storing all its data regarding crimes going back several decades.

    You can easily browse their database. Multi-table queries containing LEFT JOINs, with several WHERE conditions that contain functions such as SUBSTR are likely to return results in 0.0 seconds.

    If you don't believe me, please see The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (jump to 1:20).
     
  5. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Politiets Efterretningstjeneste

    It is possible to have too much information and too little legitimate analytical skills, leading to deleterious results based on smug, entrenched incompetence.
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    Last edited: May 4, 2013
  6. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Slice and slice/topspin second serves are a good remedy for a sore shoulder. Kick serves are generally not very nice to the shoulder.
     
  7. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    All terr0rists can be caught/located easily.

    You only need to know a little SQL. e.g.

    select fname, lname, location from suspects where lname like '%laden%' and gender = 'M'

    would have located OBL long back in 2001 itself.

    For further details, see The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.
     
  8. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    A happy day for me...when of my many tourist fares turned me onto The Millenium Series!

    A sad day for me...when I read the last page of "The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest", knowing the way-too-early and sudden death of Stieg Larsson
    probably meant no more exploits of Lisbeth Salander.

    Now, I read there may be a fourth but unfinished volume ready for print if his family and his long-term girlfriend can reach an inheritance agreement.
     
  9. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    I saw the 3 movies the other day (one a day). After seeing the first one, I saw Kill Bill and believe me, KB seemed pathetic and laughable in comparison. Just violence, no story. Then I saw KB 2 which was marginally better. I was relieved to learn that there are NO sequels to KB :)
    Then i watched part 2 and 3 of the Millenium Series.

    The plot actually weakens in part 2 and 3 (although 3 picks up a bit) but still it was better than watching the current day Hollywood stuff with actors like Cruise et al who are only good at smashing things and showing anger tantrums.

    The hacking stuff of course was largely fictional. e.g., You can't download other people's entire disks so easily without them knowing. They make a copy of Teleborian's disk with 8000 images. At one MB per image, that's 8 GB. Copying 8 GB on the net would take time, besides that guy would know since his comp would slow down.

    As I was joking before, Lisbeth Salander would have solved the terrorist problem way back in 2001, and then overthrown all world governments !
     
  10. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    The Tunguska Impact--100 Years Later

    June 30, 2008: The year is 1908, and it's just after seven in the morning. A man is sitting on the front porch of a trading post at Vanavara in Siberia. Little does he know, in a few moments, he will be hurled from his chair and the heat will be so intense he will feel as though his shirt is on fire.

    That's how the Tunguska event felt 40 miles from ground zero.

    Today, June 30, 2008, is the 100th anniversary of that ferocious impact near the Podkamennaya Tunguska River in remote Siberia--and after 100 years, scientists are still talking about it.

    "If you want to start a conversation with anyone in the asteroid business all you have to say is Tunguska," says Don Yeomans, manager of the Near-Earth Object Office at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "It is the only entry of a large meteoroid we have in the modern era with first-hand accounts."

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    Above: Trees felled by the Tunguska explosion. Credit: the Leonid Kulik Expedition.

    While the impact occurred in '08, the first scientific expedition to the area would have to wait for 19 years. In 1921, Leonid Kulik, the chief curator for the meteorite collection of the St. Petersburg museum led an expedition to Tunguska. But the harsh conditions of the Siberian outback thwarted his team's attempt to reach the area of the blast. In 1927, a new expedition, again lead by Kulik, reached its goal.

    "At first, the locals were reluctant to tell Kulik about the event," said Yeomans. "They believed the blast was a visitation by the god Ogdy, who had cursed the area by smashing trees and killing animals."

    While testimonials may have at first been difficult to obtain, there was plenty of evidence lying around. Eight hundred square miles of remote forest had been ripped asunder. Eighty million trees were on their sides, lying in a radial pattern.

    "Those trees acted as markers, pointing directly away from the blast's epicenter," said Yeomans. "Later, when the team arrived at ground zero, they found the trees there standing upright – but their limbs and bark had been stripped away. They looked like a forest of telephone poles."

    Such debranching requires fast moving shock waves that break off a tree's branches before the branches can transfer the impact momentum to the tree's stem. Thirty seven years after the Tunguska blast, branchless trees would be found at the site of another massive explosion – Hiroshima, Japan.

    Kulik's expeditions (he traveled to Tunguska on three separate occasions) did finally get some of the locals to talk. One was the man based at the Vanara trading post who witnessed the heat blast as he was launched from his chair.

    "Suddenly in the north sky… the sky was split in two, and high above the forest the whole northern part of the sky appeared covered with fire… At that moment there was a bang in the sky and a mighty crash… The crash was followed by a noise like stones falling from the sky, or of guns firing. The earth trembled."

    The massive explosion packed a wallop. The resulting seismic shockwave registered with sensitive barometers as far away as England. Dense clouds formed over the region at high altitudes which reflected sunlight from beyond the horizon. Night skies glowed, and reports came in that people who lived as far away as Asia could read newspapers outdoors as late as midnight. Locally, hundreds of reindeer, the livelihood of local herders, were killed, but there was no direct evidence that any person perished in the blast.

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    Above: The location of the Tunguska impact.

    "A century later some still debate the cause and come up with different scenarios that could have caused the explosion," said Yeomans. "But the generally agreed upon theory is that on the morning of June 30, 1908, a large space rock, about 120 feet across, entered the atmosphere of Siberia and then detonated in the sky."

    It is estimated the asteroid entered Earth's atmosphere traveling at a speed of about 33,500 miles per hour. During its quick plunge, the 220-million-pound space rock heated the air surrounding it to 44,500 degrees Fahrenheit. At 7:17 a.m. (local Siberia time), at a height of about 28,000 feet, the combination of pressure and heat caused the asteroid to fragment and annihilate itself, producing a fireball and releasing energy equivalent to about 185 Hiroshima bombs.

    "That is why there is no impact crater," said Yeomans. "The great majority of the asteroid is consumed in the explosion."

    Yeomans and his colleagues at JPL's Near-Earth Object Office are tasked with plotting the orbits of present-day comets and asteroids that cross Earth's path, and could be potentially hazardous to our planet. Yeomans estimates that, on average, a Tunguska-sized asteroid will enter Earth's atmosphere once every 300 years.

    "From a scientific point of view, I think about Tunguska all the time," he admits. Putting it all in perspective, however, "the thought of another Tunguska does not keep me up at night."
    http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2008/30jun_tunguska/
     
  11. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    December 17, 1977: Elvis Costello and the Attractions replace the Sex Pistols on Saturday Night Live

    After the Sex Pistols spat in too many faces, they were unable to obtain visas to enter the States, and it cost them a big career opportunity: a stint as the musical guests of Saturday Night Live. Instead, the task went to another gang of up-and-coming Brits, Elvis Costello and the Attractions.

    Costello and his New Wave rock group were an eleventh-hour replacement for the Pistols, and they took advantage of the tumultuous environment. They'd been scheduled to play their growing hit "Less Than Zero," but Costello cut the song abruptly after a few chords, yelling "Stop! Stop!" to his band. They segued into the far more contentious "Radio Radio," which TV execs had forbade them to play. The song criticizes the commercialization and payola of the airwaves.

    The brass at SNL were not pleased; Costello and the Attractions were subsequently banned from the show, though that was lifted in 1989. However, the singer's surly insistence on performing "Radio Radio" proved a boon to his debut album, My Aim is True. Before SNL, it had only been available in America as an import, but its popularity exploded after that evening.
    http://www.rollingstone.com/music/n...-costello-defies-saturday-night-live-20111212
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    Last edited: May 5, 2013
  12. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I like the way Nanna Bryndís Hilmarsdóttir strums her guitar.
     
  13. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Dog takes bullet to save owners son

    http://www.indianexpress.com/news/d...-save-his-owner-gets-final-farewell/1111969/0

    Anita never locked the main door of her house. The confidence, she says, came from six-month-old Eri, a Pomeranian, who was an excellent guard dog.

    Every evening, when Anita's younger son, 10-year-old Hritik, went out to play, Eri accompanied him. Daily at 7 pm, when Anita returned home, she would find Eri waiting for her at the door — a bottle of water tucked under his paw.

    And on Saturday evening, when Eri realised that there was threat to Anita's eldest son Jeetu's life, he put in his best to fight off the assailants.

    The Pomeranian was shot dead by two motorcycle-borne assailants, just 100 meters away from his home near Desh Gupta Bandhu Road in Central Delhi.

    "I have never seen such an intelligent, responsible and caring animal," Anita says. "He took the bullets on him just to save my son."

    Recalling the Saturday evening, Anita says there was a function at her home. Around 10 pm, her mother-in-law asked Jeetu help his aunt and uncle find an auto to go back home. It was dark, and Eri was not going to let Jeetu (18) go to the main road alone.

    Speaking to Newsline, Jeetu says he left the house with his relatives and Eri was in his arms. As they were looking for an auto, two bikers came asking for his younger brother Naveen (17).

    "Someone in the lane told them that I am his (Naveen's) elder brother. Without asking anything, they just opened fire. The moment Eri saw the pistol, he pounced on the bikers. As he was barking and tried to catch hold of their foot, one of the assailants shot at him. My uncle and aunt sustained bullet injuries, I escaped unhurt. It is all because Eri that the assailants got scared and fled," Jeetu says.

    He remembers how Eri stood by him earlier as well.

    "Even when my mother used to get angry at me, Eri would come running to save me. He used to lick my mother's feet and tried to calm her down. It always worked," Jeetu recalls.

    Several neighbours came to Anita's house to mourn Eri's death. Many said Eri was the fourth son to Anita, and also the most responsible one.

    After the incident, Eri was taken to a veterinary hospital, where doctors failed to the trace the bullet that had pierced his stomach. He died on his way home.

    Anita and her family bid final farewell to Eri with last rites performed at Yamuna ghat.

    "He died in my lap. He was more than a son to me. He saved my son's life. None of us have eaten since the incident. I just came back after performing his last rites, but we will always remember him as our 'Hero'," she says, looking at his photographs on her phone.
     
  14. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    The symbiotic relationship that humans and dogs have developed over the years is quite amazing. This reminds me of an article that I have previously posted, which makes me curious if there are other animals, with selective breeding over many years, that can learn to read and bond with humans to the same degree as dogs.

    Breeding Russian Foxes

    No, not breeding this kind of Russian fox:
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    Breeding this kind of Russian fox:
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    A fox that is part of an experiment started by Russian geneticist Dmitry K. Belyaev

    Guarding the Fox House

    A famous animal experiment is in peril, after 54 years of work.
    By Ceiridwen Terrill|Posted Tuesday, March 13, 2012, at 7:30 AM ET

    The battered Volga bounces us along the buckled roads, frozen and thawed over long Siberian winters. With me in the van are geneticist Lyudmila Trut and her assistant Anast?siya Kharlamova, whom I met earlier that morning at the Institute of Cytology and Genetics in Siberia.  Now in her 70s, Trut, a petite woman in a blue pinstripe jacket and light gray pants, peers through thick glasses, trying to read a scientific paper as we drive. A few minutes later, the driver stops at the dented metal gate to the experimental farm, and Trut leads the way down dilapidated rows of narrow barracks-style sheds, morning glories sprouting from cracks in the paved walkways. The farm houses 3,000 foxes, each open-air wooden shed holding 100 or so animals in adjacent wire cages. The three of us put on white lab coats and prepare to greet the foxes.

    When I open the door to one fox’s cage, the only home it will ever know, the little guy doesn’t shrink in fear as a wild creature could be expected to. Instead he lets me scoop him up, then nuzzles my neck and licks my fingers. Kharlamova, a slim young woman with shoulder-length brown hair, explains that the fox is “emotional” because I’m giving him the attention he wants. 

    Although domestication of dogs took thousands of years, Russian geneticist Dmitry K. Belyaev tried to reproduce the whole messy process in one human lifetime, eliminating all the dead ends and inefficiencies of chance and human blunder. In 1957, he began a domestication experiment with the farmed fox Vulpes vulpes, a distant cousin of the dog. In March 2011, a National Geographic article described the experiment as if it were finally on the verge of completion. Researchers were scanning the genomes of the “domesticated silver foxes,” it said, in the hopes of finding “key domestication genes.” But there's a problem with this narrative: Even after 54 years of research, we still don't know whether the animals have reached the original end point set out by the project's founder.

    Belyaev, who died in 1985 and left Lyudmila Trut in charge of the project, was clear about his goal: The foxes would be considered fully domesticated only when they obeyed human commands as dogs do. That part of the experiment is still unfinished. No evidence exists to tell us whether the foxes can be trained to override their instincts, the way a dog might learn to avoid defecating on the carpet, or to stay at the heel instead of running off to seek the company of other canines. Belyaev would never have called the experiment over until a whole population of foxes had shown that they were biddable, eager to please, and able to pass those qualities to their offspring. Now Trut would like to put those qualities to the test, but her experiment has stalled for lack of money. After 51 generations of foxes, the world’s foremost domestication experiment languishes. If nothing is done to save it, we'll have missed an opportunity to understand the mechanisms of domestication, of which genetic tameness—friendly behavior that is not learned but inherited—is only one component.

    Belyaev began with several hypotheses: People created the dog, and they did it by selecting—first unintentionally and then intentionally—for behavior.  He could replicate and accelerate the dog’s domestication process with the fox, he theorized, by rigorously selecting for tameness, which would eventually allow him to uncover the genetic mechanisms responsible for changing the dog’s wild ancestor into our beloved Fido. From fur farms where foxes had been bred in captivity for more than 50 years, Belyaev chose 130 of the calmest animals, descendants of foxes who’d already passed an unintentional selection test for tameness simply by surviving the original lure, capture, and confinement that literally scares some wild foxes to death. Kits born to Belyaev’s founding population and each succeeding generation of kits were subjected to a standardized tameness test, each animal ranked according to its response to a human experimenter who tried to touch and feed it. Only those foxes that showed tolerance for the nearness of people were selected and bred to produce the next generation, while fearful or aggressive animals were culled. Each generation of foxes grew more approachable, many showing doglike yearning for human contact. The experimental farm presently houses a stable population of genetically tame foxes.

    Results of testing by anthropologist Brian Hare and his team at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have shown that Belyaev’s foxes respond to pointing cues almost as well as dogs, which means they’re attuned to human interaction. But although we have the occasional anecdote of a fox walking on a leash or another sitting for a treat, no systematic socialization and training program has been launched to test the capacity and willingness of the foxes to respond to classic obedience cues—come, sit, down, stay, and settle— defining characteristics of a domestic canine. If fox kits are raised like dog puppies, put to the training test, and pass, then scientists would know that all the genes relevant to domestication are present in their genome. They’d just have to find them.

    Unfortunately, the experiment is broke. Grant money is scarce in Russia, where economic crises hit in 1998 and again in 2008. Trut has resorted to selling some of the foxes into the exotic pet trade through SibFox Inc., a private company in Las Vegas. For $6,950, the U.S. distributor promises a tame four-month-old fox “delivered to your door in 90 days.” Since the foxes’ critical window of socialization—the period during which they form primary bonds—closes when the animals are about 60 to 65 days old, it’s no wonder the distributor advises housing the foxes in cages with bottoms or dig guards to prevent escape, because that’s what the foxes try to do. 

    But the fact is, people aren’t lining up for pet foxes, and each year Trut and her team must either euthanize or sell several hundred foxes to fur farms because she can barely afford basic upkeep. As of this writing, fewer than five foxes have been sold in the United States as pets, and only a handful live with wealthy Russians. One sent to a home in Moscow went roaming and found himself a wild girlfriend whom he occasionally brought around for dinner. She wouldn’t go near the house, and he stayed only long enough to eat a bit of meat—less a pet than a roommate. Yet Trut soldiers on, trying to preserve the integrity of the genetic line in case funding should materialize for a rigorous socialization and training program. 

    For the experiment to continue, fox kits would have to be systematically hand-reared and human-socialized. Then they could be trained and tested for their ability and eagerness to respond to classic obedience commands. If the foxes don’t prove trainable, then perhaps domestication, even when compressed for efficiency, takes longer than one human lifetime and is more complicated than merely selecting for a single behavioral trait. Or perhaps the dog’s ancestor possessed something unique in its genes that gave rise to our closest companion, something that can’t be replicated in the fox just because it’s a social canid. The point is, we won’t know until Belyaev’s experiment is finished. Unless the experiment is helped to reach its conclusion—to understand once and for all whether the foxes have achieved domesticity as Belyaev hoped—more than half a century of intellectual labor and the lives of more than 50,000 foxes will have been wasted.

    Trut feels bad about the state of the farm and the plight of hundreds of foxes moaning and chattering for attention from their 3-foot wire cubes. On my last night in Siberia, over a meal of tsar’s hodgepodge—described in the menu as “grilled vegetables with secret sauce and garbage”—a man with his personal fifth of Beluga vodka tells me that getting by in Russia takes a lot of luck. I can’t help thinking those farm foxes need all the luck they can get. They’ve already surprised geneticists by suggesting that selection for a single behavioral trait can trigger “piggy-backing” changes in physiology and appearance, like increased levels of serotonin and piebald coats. There may be more surprises to come, but it will take a major infusion of cash, and a collaboration among scientists, adventurous dog trainers, and Lyudmila Trut to let Belyaev’s experiment—and eventually his foxes—out of the box.
    http://www.slate.com/articles/healt...foxes_in_siberia_an_experiment_in_peril_.html
     
  15. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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  16. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    John C Reilly is a vegetarian.
     
  17. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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  18. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    ^^^
    Interesting article, Sentinel.

    Garlic - history

    Originating from Central Asia, the garlic we know today is a domesticated crop. The plant has spread since ancient times to other parts of the world as a food, flavouring and medicine. It is mentioned in ancient Egyptian, Greek, Indian and Chinese writings.

    Origins

    Garlic is only found in cultivation, but researchers consider Central Asia to be its place of origin which is also home to Allium longicuspis. Some believe this plant to be a wild ancestor while others believe it to be the same species. It was probably used in Central Asia since Neolithic times as a food flavouring and seasoning.

    As a culinary and medicinal plant, garlic spread in ancient times to the Mediterranean region and beyond. It was used in Egypt by 3000 BC. It was also known by the advanced ancient civilisations of the Indus Valley, in what today is Pakistan and western India. From here it spread to China. The Spanish, Portuguese and French introduced it to the New World.

    Today, garlic is currently grown in temperate and tropical regions all over the world, and many different cultivated types have been developed to suit different climates.

    History

    The ancient Indians valued the medicinal properties of garlic and thought it to be an aphrodisiac. But it was not considered to be suitable food for the upper classes who despised its strong odour. It was also forbidden by monks who believed it to be a stimulant which aroused passions. Widows, adolescents and those who had taken up a vow or were fasting could not eat garlic because of its stimulant quality.

    It appears in the Sanskrit medical treatise, the Charaka Samhita dating from around the 2nd century BC to the 2nd century AD. Its medicinal properties were also described in the Navanitaka text written in the 4th century AD by Buddhists. This is a literature is written in a mixture of Sanskrit and Prakrit languages and forms part of the Bower Manuscripts found by Lt. H. Bower in Chinese Turkestan in the late 19th century. It was believed to cure several illnesses and promote a long life.

    Garlic also has a history of use in Ayurvedic medicine. It was thought to possess five of the six rasas or tastes defined in the Ayurvedic system, only missing the sour taste. This gave it its Sanskrit name, lasuna (or rasuna). It was thought that hanging garlic bulbs on doors would check the spread of diseases such as smallpox.

    Although highly regarded as a medicine, garlic was avoided in cookery. The Buddhists and Jains avoided eating it as did high-born Hindus and Brahmins. The Chinese pilgrim Xuan Zang visiting the sub-continent in the 7th century AD, stated that the food use of garlic was unknown, which would have been particularly true of the Buddhist circles in which he moved.

    This attitude changed with the centuries and by the period of Muslim rule, garlic, ginger and onion were, and continue to be, an indispensable trio of flavours in cuisines of South Asia.
    http://www.kew.org/plant-cultures/plants/garlic_history.html
     
  19. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Mushroom hunting is a Russian tradition. It doesn’t need any guns, only a sharp knife, a basket, and knowing what to pick. You’ll know when the season has started, when you see mushrooms for sale outside the metro. But you can pick them for free in the woods and forests around Moscow.

    By Irina Sheludkova

    The relationship between the Russian people and mushrooms is rooted in ancient times. Mushrooms saved lives during periods of famine, and were a staple food of all Slavic peoples who lived in forested areas with poor agricultural land. Since the10th century, when Orthodox Christianity was widely introduced, they became an essential part of Russian meals as a substitute for meat during Lent.

    More than 200 kinds of edible mushrooms can be found in Russia. Before the 1917 Revolution, mushroom hunting in the Yaroslavskaya, Tverskaya and Smolenskaya regions used to be more profitable than farming. At the end of the 19th century in Paris, a bottle of the famous Kargopolskiye salted orange milk mushrooms was more expensive than a bottle of vintage champagne. In 1913, the profits from the exporting of dried mushrooms to Europe amounted to half a million roubles.

    Nutrition Facts:

    Mushrooms contain a lot of protein, as well as fats and mineral substances, such as iron, calcium, zinc, iodine, phosphorus, manganese, sulphur and cuprum. 100 grammes of boiled honey agaric is sufficient for the recommended daily dose of zinc and cuprum. Dried mushrooms contain up to 30% protein and 100 grammes is enough for a daily protein balance. A broth prepared from dried porcini is 7 times more nourishing than meat broth.

    As for vitamins, many kinds of mushrooms are as good as vegetables and fruit. For example, chanterelles contain as much vitamin C as citrus and currants.

    Unpleasant Facts:

    Some mushrooms contain harmful toxins which can cause illness, and in a small number of cases can be lethal. There are about 25 kinds of distinctively poisonous and dangerous mushrooms growing in Russia. Most dangerous are amanitas. According to government statistics most cases of mushroom poisoning are caused from consumption of false honey fungus, morels and death cap amanita.

    Mushroom poisoning, however, can easily be avoided. You just need to be able to tell an edible from a non-edible variety. If in doubt, before you start cooking, ask your Russian neighbours; from an early age Russians go en famille mushroom hunting, and know which mushrooms to avoid. If you do feel ill, go to the doctor, and take the suspect mushrooms with you.

    Do’s And Don’ts:

    The Moscow region is considered to be relatively safe in terms of mushroom picking, except the Mytischisnky and Dub ninskiy districts. Experts do not recommend mushroom picking in Moscow itself and within a 30 km radius around the city.

    When you go mushroom hunting, treat nature with respect. Use a clean knife to cut mushrooms and be careful not to destroy mushroom spawn, which is very delicate.

    Pick only those mushrooms that you know well.

    Don’t pick over-grown mushrooms, even if they are not worm-eaten.

    Mushrooms spoil quickly, so don’t store them for a long time, especially in warm temperatures. Don’t wash fresh mushrooms, and keep them refrigerated in a paper bag (which keeps away humidity and allows circulation of air) for no more than 5 days.

    Don’t store salted mushrooms in zinc-coated and clay crockery.


    Chanterelle (Lisichki): Found in leafed and mixed forests. Contain 2.4% of fat – the highest proportion among mushrooms. Can be boiled, fried, marinated and salted. More suited for simple dishes to keep the splendid aroma. Goes well with fowl and eggs.

    Oyster Mushroom (Veshenka): Found on tree trunks and stubs. Ideal for stir-fry, and is cooked in about 3 minutes. Sold in supermarkets all year round.

    Porcini (Beliy Grib): Found in pine, spruce and mixed forests. Mainly used dried, as it accumulates a rich flavour; because of this only a small amount is required for cooking.

    Yellow Boletus (Maslyata): Found on forest edges, mainly pine woods, usually grows in batches and is among the first to appear at the start of the season. Contains only 0.3% of fat.

    Orange Milk Mushroom (Ryzhik): Found in pine forests. An Autumn mushroom; but appears also in large quantities during summer as well.

    Aspen Mushroom (Podosinovik): Good when boiled, fried, marinated and dried.

    Rough Boletus (Podberyozovik): Found in birch woods. Ideal for drying and marinating. The young mushroom is good for boiling.

    Russule (Syroezhka): Found in any kind of forest. There are 27 kinds. Soak in cold water before cooking. Can be boiled, fried, marinated and salted.

    Honey Agaric (Opyata): Found on stubs at tree felling sites.

    Milk Mushroom (Gruzd): Salted milk mushroom is the most common mushroom zakuska eaten as an accompaniment with vodka in Russia.
    http://www.passportmagazine.ru/article/257/
     
  20. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    In the 70's or 80's (in India) garlic was touted as being good for heart problems. One pod of raw garlic a day. Don't know if it is still taken. Garlic pearls flooded the market.

    Regarding the thing of garlic and passion in ancient texts or wrt monks -- I am not sure whether passion here is used in its sexual connotation.

    Food is divided into three types: saattvic, raajasic, and taamasic. The middle category contains stimulants such as non-veg food, garlic, chillies, onion, tea and coffee too.

    Passion here imo refers more to activity. And even more so to mental activity. Tamasic/Taamasic refers to dullness and is associated with alcohol or other fermented foods.

    So those who meditate need an alert mind, an aware mind, a one-pointed mind, but not a mind that is running here and there, not a scattered mind which is what the "passionate" foods give you. The third category may arrest thoughts and mind wandering, but the mind will be dull and trance-like not alert and aware. Thus the peace after having a few drinks is not the peace or the state the monks want.

    imo, all this is only of use for those who meditate regularly. I don;t think others will see much difference (assuming they are moderate of course). btw, i do take onions and garlic and one cuppa coffee.
     
  21. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Larry King, with a long history of heart disease, has long been a paid spokesperson for garlic products as an aid to cardiovascular health. Garlic is also touted as a holistic remedy for flea infestation on domesticated pets.
     
  22. GRANITECHIEF

    GRANITECHIEF Hall of Fame

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  23. GRANITECHIEF

    GRANITECHIEF Hall of Fame

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  24. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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  25. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2013
  26. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Lingonberries (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) are to Scandinavians what blackberries are to Americans – an abundant wild fruit free for the taking by anyone with a basket, a harvesting fork, and the patience to pick through and clean their harvest. Produced by low, evergreen shrubs throughout Scandinavia's forests, the tart red berries are much smaller and juicier than their distant cousin, the cranberry. Bursting with natural preservatives and pectin, lingonberries were invaluable to earlier generations of Scandinavians, for they could be kept for months at room temperature simply by placing them in jars of water (vattlingon) or by stirring the raw berries with a small amount of sugar to make rårörda lingon, an easy lingonberry jam (no cooking required). If looking for lingonberries or lingonberry jam in ethnic European food markets, you may also find them called red whortleberries, cowberries, fox berries, mountain cranberries, mountain bilberries, or partridgeberries.

    Pronunciation: LIN-GHUN-BERRIES

    Also Known As: Tyttebær (in Norwegian and Danish), rauðber (in Icelandic), puolukka(in Finnish), and lingon (in Swedish).
    http://scandinavianfood.about.com/od/scandinavianfoodglossary/g/lingonberries.htm
    [​IMG]
     
  27. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    The most important week of school and I've just got a hideous case of food poisoning.
     
  28. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    As you are a chef, I hope it was not from something you prepared. I once bought an egg salad sandwich from a vending machine before taking a train from Copenhagen to Stockholm. It was a very bad decision, for which the Swedish train tracks beneath the WC paid a heavy price as the train traversed the route.
     
  29. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Never knew school was important. ;)
     
  30. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Great Scot !

    It's Murray's birthday today. Haggis on the house for everyone.
     
  31. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Maria Kirilenko has become less tight and more open since dating Alex Ovechkin.[​IMG]
     
  32. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Hingis can have the haggis with a Jack and Coke; I'll have a mushroom caviar blini (which I am currently craving) and a single malt scotch.
     
  33. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    It is probably best not to order bok choy on a first date.
    [​IMG]
     
  34. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Kvass: innately delicious or an acquired taste?
    [​IMG]
     
  35. Puddy

    Puddy Rookie

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    Why not? :confused::confused::confused:
     
  36. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2013/01/grail-moon-flyover/

     
  37. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    MAY 12, 2013 | 05:44PM PT
    David Bowie song is sung by Canadian astronaut from International Space Station

    Pat Saperstein
    @Variety_PatS

    International Space Station commander Chris Hadfield was already becoming an Internet sensation with his 770,000 Twitter followers and videos of him strumming a guitar and cooking spinach in space. But now the Canadian astronaut has topped those short performances with a competently-sung rendition of David Bowie’s song “Space Oddity.” The performance of the classically spacey song while actually floating in space “wins the Internet” as some commenters have suggested. Hadfield plays his acoustic guitar alongside shots of the station zooming over earth in the video which the staff of the Canadian Space Agency helped mix. Hadfield handed over the station’s command on Sunday to Russian cosmonaut Pavel Vinogradov.

    Apparently Bowie approves of Hadfield’s version, as he posted the video and the collage seen above on his Facebook fan page with a shoutout to Canadian musician Emm Gryner, who has played with his band and helped produce the version sent from space.
    http://variety.com/2013/music/news/...chris-hadfield-sings-space-oddity-1200479802/

    Bok choy is very fibrous and is prone to getting lodged between teeth.

    On a date with Maria Kirilenko, she smiles, revealing bright green strands of bok choy stuck between her front teeth. Would it be best to point this out in the following tactful manner?

    "Hey, Maria, you have bok choy stuck in your teeth!" Maria responds, "Well, so do you! Hey, let's use our tongues to remove each other's bok choy!"
     
  38. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Thank heaven for little girls (like ILC)

    Thank heaven for them all,

    No matter where no matter who

    For without them, what would little boys (like Dedans) do?

    -- Gigi
    (1958)
     
  39. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    ^^^senti, despite your TTG status, you have not learned you cannot put an "8" before a closing parentheses without it morphing into the above indecipherable gobblydook!
     
  40. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    ^ My apologies, I am well aware of that *bug* in the TW software but forget it once in a while.
    I shall go to Profile and switch off smilies (if that option exists in Profile).
     
  41. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    We got sunlight on the sand,
    We got moonlight on the sea,
    We got mangoes and bananas
    You can pick right off the tree,
    We got volleyball and ping-pong
    And a lot of dandy games!
    What ain't we got?
    We ain't got dames!

    We get packages from home,
    We get movies, we get shows,
    We get speeches from our skipper
    And advice from Tokyo Rose,
    We get letters doused with perfume
    We get dizzy from the smell!
    What don't we get?
    You know darn well!

    We have nothin' to put on a clean white suit for
    What we need is what there ain't no substitute for...

    There is nothin' like a dame,
    Nothin' in the world,
    There is nothin' you can name
    That is anythin' like a dame!

    http://www.stlyrics.com/lyrics/southpacific/thereisnothinlikeadame.htm
     
  42. mandy01

    mandy01 G.O.A.T.

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    ^^ Hey, Senti! Am going to be in Delhi from the first week of June. As a woman who's travelling alone for the most part what are the general safety tips you'd give? Also, are there any areas I should particularly avoid? Is it safe to walk alone on streets because I keep hearing and reading a lot of stuff.

    Sorry for the OT post but didn't know where to fit the post.
     
  43. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Tough to say since I am totally housebound and don't see the papers or telly.

    I can only suggest avoid going out alone at night. Avoid taxis at night if alone - unless they are some known radio taxis. Personally, (as a guy) I am more afraid of cops than anyone else. I've had quite a few bad experiences since they are always trying to extort money.

    Places to avoid : again i can't say, it's not like South Delhi or CP is all that safe. Incidents can happen anywhere. And there are slums and male-dominated areas/ villages even in S Delhi (e.g. Munirka and various sarais).

    Sorry but i can't suggest more. Maybe I'll shoot an email to my cousin and get her views.
     
  44. mandy01

    mandy01 G.O.A.T.

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    Thank you so much! I'm going to live near Kaka Nagar and my workplace is going to be near the Supreme Court. I know these areas are not entirely safe (nothing can be) but was wondering if it's feasible to travel there alone during daytime at least.
     
  45. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    Deleted post.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2013
  46. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    So is this...
     
  47. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Kaka Nagar is safe. It's opposite Sunder Nagar, its a gov colony, i often used to come there to buy vegetables. When driving by we still stop there. The vegetable chap at the Safal Store is a very nice person, always greets us and helps us out.

    It's a short trip to Supreme Court and that's safe too -- no worries. The area around you -- Khan Market, golf links etc is safe.

    Area to avoid alone is Nizamuddin West area around the Lodhi Hotel/Oberoi flyover where a lot of drug addicts hang out at the intersection/lights, its a slum area and "incidents" often happen.

    You are coming at the hottest time. Temps are already around 46-47C and possibly may go to 48 or 50 C in June. I don't know whether this is record heat or what. My cousin is off to the country so no internet access, so i am not getting a reply, but i think you are pretty safe where you are.
     
  48. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I have not spent much time in Gothenburg, but for some reason, I have seen many fights there. There seems to be a meaner energy there than in Malmö or Stockholm.

    Stockholm is notorious for sharp Swedish elbows knifing passengers on commuter trains. Swedes like their space.

    The elbows strike me as far sharper and more dangerous in Gothenburg. Don't go to the wrong bar or club in Gothenburg.
    [​IMG]
     
  49. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    June 1st is Henin's birthday.
     
  50. Dedans Penthouse

    Dedans Penthouse Hall of Fame

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    (o o) (o o)

    Suzanne Lenglen and Steffi Graf, both HOF former #1's share the same astrological sign: Gemini

    hmmm...so it dosen't only begin and end with the nose...
     

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