Useless information thread

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by forzainter, Oct 17, 2007.

  1. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Two lefthanders were born 45 days apart. The Virgo is James Scott Connors; the Libra...well, it's me. Wish my mom and grandmom had been into tennis; also wish my older brother was a leftie, so I hadn't crossed over to rightie...I learned baseball as my first sport with his hand-me-down glove.
     
  2. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I have yet to reach nirvana eating a pizza. What are the elements that define a great pizza?
     
  3. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Davydenko was born on June 2nd.

    ^ Talking of pizza, its like an oven here in India. Temperature 45 to 50 Celsius.
     
  4. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    It's all in the dough...good water is the key there. NYC h2o seems to catalyze the unique flavor in pizzas baked there in stone ovens.
     
  5. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I was channel surfing during commercials while watching the Federer match, and came across a college softball game. It is amazing how fast the pitchers can throw underhanded, with seemingly little effort.

    Probably due to many years of serving, I have a good arm for throwing a baseball or football, but I can not imagine throwing a softball underhanded with any speed. From a biomechanical standpoint, it is hard for me to figure out how these women generate so much speed
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2013
  6. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    This may be my issue with pizza; I never get too excited by the crust. I have been to recommended restaurants for pizza in New York and Italy, and my thoughts have always been along the lines of, "That was pretty good."

    I have been to places in pizza-deprived cities like Moscow and Copenhagen, where I have found satisfying pizzas. In the San Francisco Bay Area, if I want a pizza, I usually get a deep dish pizza from Zachary's.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. vive le beau jeu !

    vive le beau jeu ! G.O.A.T.

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    hot pink slugs and cannibal snails

    Giant Hot Pink Slugs Discovered Atop Unique Australian Peak
    Michael Harper for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online

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    Image Credit: NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service
    from: http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1112861996/hot-pink-slugs-discovered-053113/
     
  8. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Pizza is heavenly. I like deep dish pizza with jalapenos! Chicago is rated as the best U.S. city for pizza.

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-10-best-us-cities-for-pizza-2013-03-13

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  9. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Thai dragon peppers
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    should not be bought on a day of poor quality control at a Rue Poncelet Market.
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    Last edited: Jun 4, 2013
  10. TheNightHunter

    TheNightHunter Banned

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    Recently it was brought to my attention that dolphins are one of the very few animals (along with apes) capable of unprovoked murder and r.ape. Shortly thereafter I burnt all my DVD copies of Flipper, and whenever I go to the aquarium now, I make it a point to refrain from making any blowhole jokes.

    Does intelligence breed evil? And, does this mean that as intelligence increases, the capacity to inflict unspeakable acts of cruelty upon your brethren also becomes greater? Or is there a point at which intelligence affords some degree of spiritual enlightenment which would preclude anybody attaining it from commiting such acts?

    I have always had an innate fear of chimps. They sure look funny when they are little dressed in their tiny locomotive engineer outfits. But as they grow they become rather dangerous and devious animals.
     
  11. Claudius

    Claudius Professional

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  12. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    "In Turin on 3rd January, 1889, Friedrich Nietzsche steps out of the doorway of number six, Via Carlo Alberto. Not far from him, the driver of a hansom cab is having trouble with a stubborn horse. Despite all his urging, the horse refuses to move, whereupon the driver loses his patience and takes his whip to it. Nietzsche comes up to the throng and puts an end to the brutal scene, throwing his arms around the horse’s neck, sobbing. His landlord takes him home, he lies motionless and silent for two days on a divan until he mutters the obligatory last words, and lives for another ten years, silent and demented, cared for by his mother and sisters. We do not know what happened to the horse.”


    The Turin Horse (directed by Bela Tarr) - Hungarian movie, 2011.
     
  13. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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  14. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    The Edinburgh Castle, situated in a bad neighborhood in San Francisco, has been frequented by Irvine Welsh.
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    Last edited: Jun 8, 2013
  15. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Lately, it seems no good day goes unpunished in my employment in the fickle weather patterns of Central Florida's approaching summer....work three good days followed by three days of TS Andrea; get a good night, now housebound by a huge band of thundershowers spread across the entire peninsula. My dogs love the extra company but somehow I must pay the bills:confused:!
     
  16. TheNightHunter

    TheNightHunter Banned

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    Intriguing. I will have to find the movie. Have you watched it?
     
  17. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Florida should export some of that rain to California.
     
  18. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    I would like to be exported to Cali ASAP! Know anyone looking for a racquet tech with mad stringing experience???
     
  19. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    A near riot in Rome

    1978
    The Italian Open tennis tournament was a riot that year. Nothing too unusual in that when Italian players were involved, especially Rome's favourite son Adriano Panatta. The only player ever to beat Björn Borg at the French Open, he did it twice. Today he played him in the final of the Italian singles. Both players were trying to regain the title, but Borg had more to contend with. He was playing against Panatta and his backing band, the Roman crowd. In his semi-final against Panatta, José Higueras of Spain had walked off when the deluge of insults and beer cans became too much. British umpire Bertie Bowron went with him. Today the mob was just as unruly, and although they were throwing beer and coins at an iceberg, even Borg was moved to ask the umpire for help. But at the start of the match, it wasn't the crowd that got to him. Even the local insects were in on the act. In trying to swat away a wasp, Borg cut his forehead with his own racquet! No wonder he lost the first set 6-1. He won the next two easily, but Panatta took the fourth. Then Borg broke to lead 2-0 and 3-1 in the fifth in between protesting about the coins that started landing around him. As if he needed the money. He was glad to get off without further bloodshed after winning the title 6-3.
    http://www.espn.co.uk/onthisday/sport/story/164.html#
     
  20. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Yes, however, this story is mentioned at the start of the movie, but the movie has little to do with it. It has more to do with the very tough and spartan life of some people in the middle of nowhere.

    I could literally write an essay on what they "eat". Their life is mind-numbing and i could only admire the way they lived it. It's not a movie for everyone. It gives you a lot of time to wonder what is happening inside their minds, what about other details of their lives, what will happen if the man dies, etc etc.

    Ebert says it is one of Tarr's weaker efforts. Some people find Bela Tarr's movies to be "a crashing bore" but somehow i loved it.
     
  21. TheNightHunter

    TheNightHunter Banned

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    Thank you, Sentinel. I will definitely watch this. I'm not familiar with Tarr's work. But your description of it reminds me somewhat of Tarkovsky (you are probably familiar with Solaris, Stalker, etc). Stalker is one of the stranges movies I have ever seen. It's very drawn out too, but it is strangely good.

    Then there is the last movie from Lars Von Trier (don't remember the name, it has Wilhelm Dafoe on it). Good movie, but not easy to watch. And very slow as well.
     
  22. TheNightHunter

    TheNightHunter Banned

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    HAHAHAHAHA. Pretty brutal.
     
  23. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    ^^That Borg-Panatta final in Rome was epic! From that era, Jimmy Connors was pretty outrageous but still a incredible player!

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    Last edited: Jun 9, 2013
  24. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    ^^^From the same era as Borg/Panatta & the riotous Roman throng, the USA @ Romania Davis Cup final in '72 was also no pleasant walk in the park!

    Remembering back, this was the first year in which the defending champion did not go directly into the final. As a result, Romania earned the opportunity to be the first non-"Big 4" nation to host a final. The US team, with Jewish members Gottfried and Solomon, were making their first trip behind the Iron Curtain only weeks after the Munich Olympics massacre. Lots of tension, lots of gamesmanship from Nastase and Tiriac, and possibly the worst "home-cooking" officiating in Davis Cup history. Still not enough to take the Cup as Stan Smith played courageously and won the deciding match in five sets over Tiriac after having taken his opening singles and doubles matches.

    That was a great year for Smith...he also won Wimby over Nastase that summer!
     
  25. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    I had no idea MC Hammer's name originated from the mind of HOF baseball star, Reggie Jackson!

    Young Hammer was made a clubhouse attendant by Oakland A's owner Charlie Finley during the early 70's. Jackson, playing for Oakland at the time, noticed a strong facial resemblance between the youngster and baseball great "Hammerin'" Hank Aaron. Thus, the nickname stuck!
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2013
  26. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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  27. TheNightHunter

    TheNightHunter Banned

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    I wonder how many Connors matches Djokovic has watched. He sure seems to have taken some pages from the Connors' Book of Jokes.
     
  28. TheNightHunter

    TheNightHunter Banned

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    Not the Gottfried!

    [​IMG]

    Anyway, I took that cue since we are in the Useless Information thread to take the opportunity to ask if anybody watched a program called USA Up All Night in the late 80s and early-mid 90s in the USA TV channel which showed on Friday and Saturday nights, with Gilbert Gottfried and Rhonda Shear hosting in which they showed incredibly outrageous B-Movies (normally teen movies involving mild nudity and vulgar language).

    [​IMG]

    TNT's MonsterVision was a similar program.

    Here's a webpage which talks about them, for the nostalgic.

    Thank you for the information, stringertom, and sorry for this unscheduled interruption in your normal programming. ;)
     
  29. TheNightHunter

    TheNightHunter Banned

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    I live relatively close (about 25 miles away) from MC Hammer's mansion. As a matter of fact, a friend of the family which was quite wealthy (real estate) used to live right across MC Hammer's place (was it called Hammertime?) in the Oakland Hills. I was there one time on the way to the airport, but it was late at night so I didn't get to see anything.

    After losing all of his money due to skyrocketting costs (huge entourage) and the inexplicable fall in popularity of his music and baggy pants, MC Hammer filed for bankruptcy, lost Hammertime, and I think he is living in either Tracy or Manteca, which are cities removed from where all the stuff happens. Very cheap (comparatively) housing, and horrible, very hot summers.
     
  30. TheNightHunter

    TheNightHunter Banned

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    Thank you, borg number one. Stunning...

    This reminds me of the old joke:
    "My family used to own a galaxy, you could jump on your spaceship and travel across it for millenia without reaching the other end"
    "Wow, that must have been a huge galaxy"
    "Not really, it was a very slow spaceship"

    I was looking for the original joke where the galaxy is a farm and the spaceship is a truck, but I can't find it. I've only heard it once or twice in my life, so I know I got it all wrong. :)
     
  31. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Thanks TheNightHunter.

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    Last edited: Jun 11, 2013
  32. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    TheNightHunter is currently in a parallel universe ;)
     
  33. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Ha ha. I hear you Sentinel. Nice avatar by the way!



     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2013
  34. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Keep on the Grass

    By BEN SHPIGEL
    Published: July 6, 2012

    WIMBLEDON, England — The grass at Wimbledon is so lush that it feels almost sinful to walk on it. A grounds crew irrigates it and mows it. An independent turf consultant measures the surface’s hardness, its chlorophyll index and its live grass content.

    Groundskeepers working at a baseline on Friday. The crew also uses a high-powered vacuum that slurps up dust and debris.
    It is that devotion that allowed the grass to look as dazzling on Friday, Day 11, as it did at the tournament’s beginning, with two noticeable exceptions: the stomped, gouged brown deserts at both baselines.

    The ever-expanding, ever-more-rutted blotches — by now they resemble an unwatered fairway on a budget-strapped golf course — cannot be reseeded until after the tournament. And so they remain a part of the Wimbledon experience, as inevitable as rain.

    “It’s a two-week championship,” said Eddie Seaward, the longtime head groundsman. “The first week, there’s a lot of grass. The second week, there’s not as much. Players adapt.”

    So do groundskeepers, who realize that not much can be done to improve a court’s appearance by this stage of the tournament. As long as players prefer slugging out points with ground strokes, the baseline will remain the most heavily trafficked area of the court.

    Asked why his forehand started working better in the third set of his loss to Andy Murray on Friday, Jo-Wilfried Tsonga said: “When you have the ball above the net height on grass, it’s easier to play, and when the ball comes at you more slowly, it’s easier to play. But when a guy hits hard and deep, I think you have to have been out there playing to understand, but it’s hard to really hit the ball.

    “You can’t really hit on grass. There are lots of bad bounces, so when the guy plays deep into the spot where the grass has been worn down and he doesn’t leave you the time to play, you don’t have time to play fast yourself.”

    The best that groundskeepers can do is patrol those bare areas with a high-powered vacuum called a Billy Goat, which slurps up lingering dust and debris.

    Mark Ferguson is one of three members of the Sports Turf Research Institute’s on-site team, which monitors the performance and the playing quality of the courts. The wear and tear sustained at Wimbledon in two weeks, he said, was not unlike what a soccer field experiences — over a full season.

    “It’s inevitable, to a large extent,” Ferguson, a research manager at the institute, said. “From our point of view, we’re not as worried about the area behind the baseline because it’s off the court. It’s only when the patches that are worn out creep onto the court — we’re worried about that.”

    Those patches can produce irregular bounces — obvious to the player, but barely perceptible to fans in the crowd or television viewers. If the ball strikes a bare spot, it is more likely to decelerate or bounce slightly higher than it is to skid laterally.

    Agnieszka Radwanska, who will play Serena Williams in the women’s singles final Saturday, said the uneven bounces could be “really tricky.” Williams did not seem as bothered.

    “I think it’s maybe a better bounce when it’s more green, but this is still a good bounce,” Williams said. “It’s not so bad. It’s kind of worn in, almost a little more hard-courty, which is always good for me.”

    On the whole, the surface plays much more like a hard court than it did 15 years ago. The grass then was laden with poa annua, a weed also known as bluegrass, and rewarded players whose fast serves would skid along the soft court. It was so spongy, in fact, that Patrick McEnroe said he changed his ritual before serving because the ball would not bounce back into his hand.

    In consultation with the Sports Turf Research Institute, Wimbledon in 2001 switched to a perennial ryegrass, which yields higher bounces. Underneath that ryegrass is a clay-based, loamy-type of soil that, when it dries out and the grass above is ripped away, can generate cracks.


    Hardly any cracks have appeared this tournament, Ferguson said, as much a product of vigilance as the weather. The conditions have not been favorable for the tournament schedule, delaying several matches, but the cooler temperatures and abundant moisture in the air have helped keep the grass intact.

    Ferguson said that his measurements Friday revealed an average grass cover of about 75 percent on the courts, a rating he called “excellent” for this stage of the tournament. That figure drops to about 10 to 15 percent by the baseline — and that is not necessarily a bad thing.

    “As it becomes more of a dirt surface, the players actually have a little more confidence moving left to right because they can feel their feet under them,” said Darren Cahill, who is an analyst for ESPN at the tournament. “The courts, those first few days, are quite lush, and you have that unsure footing. You see much more slipping in the early days than you do in the later days.”

    To that point, McEnroe cited Rafael Nadal’s early round struggles at Wimbledon. Even though Nadal has won two titles here en route to a 36-6 record, it often takes him a few matches to find a rhythm. Of the eight five-set matches he has played at Wimbledon, five have come within the first week, when the grass is softer. Without solid footing, Nadal cannot generate as much racket speed to lash his ground strokes, which hindered him during a second-round loss to Lukas Rosol.

    “The conditions in the first week here actually hurt Nadal,” said McEnroe, an ESPN analyst who, like Cahill, is playing in the gentlemen’s senior invitation doubles tournament. “He would much rather prefer they started the tournament with the courts being the way they are now.”
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/07/s...dskeepers-try-to-maintain-the-grass.html?_r=0
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  35. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Roger Federer - okay R and F are consecutive ...

    Rafa Nadal ??? Bingo !
     
  36. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Great post Mike Bulgakov. That article is so descriptive that you feel that you're trying to deal with the bounces on Centre Court. Thanks.

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  37. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    You have a great point. Yet, how about Rafael Nadal Sentinel? You have the "a" and the "e".
     
  38. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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  39. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    One of my favorite movie endings ever is from 2001: A Space Odyssey (and Beyond the Infinite). When talking movies, I can't believe some people haven't seen this masterpiece.

    See: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pIwvLJX-Olg
     
  40. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Antebellum plantation owners in Kentucky used slave labor to cultivate the hemp product...this gives new meaning to "The Blue Grass State"!
     
  41. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    ROFLMAO material...the USGA has a "While we're young" TV ad campaign in an attempt to speed up play; first, thanks for a reprise of the classic "Caddyshack" line; second, the one with Arnold Palmer and Clint Eastwood is a pure gem with the "Dirty Harry" glare at the end the "cherry on the top"!
     
  42. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Stringertom, did you hear/see that in Kentucky recently, hemp production became legal?

    Here's an article on the hemp legislation below by the way:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/09/kentucky-hemp-bill_n_3045431.html

    I used to live in Kentucky when I was very young and I just loved the Kentucky Wildcats back then and I got a chance to see some great horse farms. On the blue grass thing, Kentucky really does have some beautiful grass.

    See: http://www.netstate.com/states/intro/ky_intro.htm

    Also, I haven't been able to catch the U.S. Open lately. I'm not a big golf fan, yet I do tend to check out the final rounds at the majors. Nicklaus, Hogan, Palmer or Tiger Woods in your book? I was a Nicklaus fan when young. That guy could play some amazing lights out golf. It's interesting that as in tennis, you see changes in how the game is played over the years, especially with equipment changes. It seems like drivers and putters have changed the most with technology changes, yet I'm no golf expert. Perhaps the irons are much different these days too. Anyway, have fun watching the U.S. Open this weekend! Here's a guy that has tried to use a mathematical model to "compute" who is the greatest golfer ever. He has calculated that Tiger Woods needs "just needs to win roughly four more majors and 15 more PGA tournaments to become the greatest of all time. It's a different sport, but this sure sounds familiar doesn't it?

    See: http://fox5sandiego.com/2013/06/10/...mathematically-greatest-golfer/#ixzz2WL9cQ1sY

     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2013
  43. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    IMO, in deference to the great one in your user name, consider Nicklaus as the greatest due to his parallel to Borg...a player who racked up majors while competing in peak eras of several other greats. Nicklaus won versus Palmer, Trevino, Watson, Ballesteros et al. He also finished second/third (18 wins, 19 seconds, 9 thirds) in majors while dueling vs those greats and more. Woods? Not so much! Consider this factoid...Tiger has never won a major without the lead entering the final round.

    As to equipment changes, the biggest impact from techno advances are in the ball. Ask any pro if they could control an old balata with the new springboard clubheads and you will get a resounding "NO"!
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2013
  44. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Yes, I agree stringertom. Thank you. I'd give it to Nicklaus. Your point on his competition at the top is an excellent one. The guy had some serious power too. Your take on it sounds right. Great info on the ball! That is a real good point and makes sense. So, you get more control on chips plus more power with the new balls? That would definitely make a tremendous difference. I think Nicklaus would have thrived with modern technology as well.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2013
  45. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Guy Forget's Lacoste Equijet racquet looked like a guitar, but he played very well with the racquet. Was it shaped by Marat Safin? It may stand out as a more unusual design than the racquet that Noah used to win Roland Garros.
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    Last edited: Jun 16, 2013
  46. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Watching "Blade Runner" makes me think about the Beijing air.
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  47. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    The French do like to do things different...vive la difference!

    Imagine my take on things as a nine-year-old moving to France and seeing so many of Citroen's auto offerings so different to the big-fins rage of the early 60's American autos. Two particularly stood out...the down-and-dirty sardine-can "Deux Chevaux" and the ultra-modern "flying saucer" DS sedan that looked like it was ready for take-off to the next galaxy!
     
  48. vive le beau jeu !

    vive le beau jeu ! G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    Messages:
    11,575
    Location:
    Ometepe, Pink Granite, Queyras, Kerguelen (...)
    reminded me of the streaker that crossed the court during a kournikova match at the time of this ad...

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]
     
  49. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    14,223
    Location:
    In a sureshsian vortex
    Personally, I'm glad streaking did not become an addictive disorder in my life. My one-and-done performance occurred just weeks before graduation from FSU when thousands of us succumbed to mass (thankfully the babes weren't massive) hysteria and bared it all across Landis Green and the adjoining Student Union complex. BTW, if you are considering endurance-distance streaking, I encourage investment in nude-shaded support devices to avoid extreme post-event discomfort!:twisted:
     
  50. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    746
    Location:
    The Future
    Forgotten Super Glue Ad

    ^^^
    Text of a pulled Super Glue ad: "If there is too much swing to your thing when running naked in public, don't forget Super Glue! A few drops of Super Glue attaching your unit to a leg will prevent unwanted post-streaking discomfort." The ad was cancelled after many lawsuits filed during the streaking era.

    The only streaking I have seen in person has been at the Roskilde Festival naked run for beer. I have been surprised at how many attractive women will shed their clothes and race each other for free beer.
     

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