Useless information thread

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by forzainter, Oct 17, 2007.

  1. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    No one's touching this subject, Mike...just a little too "sticky", no?
     
  2. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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  3. Dedans Penthouse

    Dedans Penthouse Hall of Fame

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    "Aaron Hernandez?....you don't frighten me Mr. Kraft..."[​IMG][/QUOTE]
     
  4. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    "Sticky Fingers" was a great album by the Strolling Bones, most notably highlighted by an album cover complete with a working zipper and designed by Andy Warhol. Aaron Hernandez might be sitting by his front door waiting for the cops and listening to one track in particular..."Can't You Hear Me Knockin'?"
     
  5. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    By far the most decadent and shocking rock documentary I have seen is a film about the Rolling Stones by Robert Frank. Out of deference for the moderators, I won't circumnavigate the filter to write the title. The film was made in the early 1970s.

    The documentary makes "Gimme Shelter" look like a Disney film. I was given a bootleg version of it from a Russian friend, but the film is hard to find because the Rolling Stones prevented it from being distributed. There was too much controversial footage, even for the Rolling Stones. It is a pretty depressing film.
     
  6. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I really like beets.
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  7. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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  8. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Mike must "love the smell of borscht in the morning"!
     
  9. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Wednesday, June 5, 2013
    By Guillaume Willecoq

    The Perrier Legends’ Trophy is under way once again, and the star-studded field includes Mats Wilander, who was three times a winner here at Roland Garros (in 1982, 1985 and 1988). And up until now, everyone thought that he had won the tournament on his debut…

    Unfortunately, this was a case of not letting the facts get in the way of a good story. A year before his surprise win in 1982, the Swede actually played the qualifiers here, and had his first taste of defeat.

    The first doubts arose when Wilander was asked about his earliest memories of Roland Garros. “What people don’t tend to mention when they say that I won the French the first time I played was that I entered the qualifiers in 1981. And I lost in the third round.” And yet neither the ATP nor the ITF mentions the three-time champion playing the qualifiers. If you dig deep in the archives at the FFT museum here at Roland Garros however, you do indeed find evidence of a certain Mats Wilander back in 1981…

    The Swede was only 16 at the time but had already made a name for himself. He was signed up to play in the boys’ singles, which he duly won. “If I remember correctly, I beat Pat Cash, Miloslav Mecir… and Henri Leconte as well I think. Mecir, Leconte, Cash… wow! Incredible. That was quite a year! It was a big win for me. I think I was top junior in the world that year. It was great to play the final on No.1 Court which had only recently been built, but at the same time it was strange because I was already playing on the main tour and I knew that it would be my last juniors’ tournament.”

    Restrepo gives the record to Rafa

    A fortnight before lifting the juniors’ trophy, young Mats played his first qualifiers and certainly did not look out of place, beating South African Brent Pirow 6-3, 7-5 then Japanese semi-pro player Tsuyoshi ***ui 6-0, 7-5 to get within one match of the main draw.

    And then along came Javier Restrepo, a Colombian player in his late 20s who chiefly played on the Challenger circuit in Latin America, though he did regularly represent his country in Davis Cup competition. And Restrepo only went and beat Wilander 6-4, 6-4 to qualify for his first, and indeed only, Grand Slam main draw. “I ended up spending the entire fortnight at Roland Garros and managed to take in what was going on around me,” said a philosophical Wilander. “I remember going to Centre Court just after winning the juniors to watch the last set of the Borg – Lendl final. It was great – seeing Björn Borg win his sixth French Open… Borg was more than an idol for me. He was… unreal. It was the first time I had seen him live and there he was, finishing off the final with a 6-1 last set. And I knew that that was where I wanted to be.”

    And just a year later, there he was. And while Wilander wrote a page of tennis history in June 1982, an asterisk needs to be added. The Swede was the first player to win the French Open on his main draw debut. And Yannick Noah was not the first player to beat Wilander in Paris after all. And Rafael Nadal is the only player to win on his debut in Paris.
    http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/articles/2013-06-05/201306051370433616310.html
     
  10. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    The unlikely origin of fish and chips

    By James Alexander
    BBC News

    For generations, fish and chips have fed millions of memories - eaten with greasy fingers on a seaside holiday, a pay-day treat at the end of the working week or a late-night supper on the way home from the pub.

    Few can resist the mouth-watering combination - moist white fish in crisp golden batter, served with a generous portion of hot, fluffy chips.

    Everyone has their own preferences and tastes vary from one part of the country to another. Cod or haddock? Salt and vinegar? Pickled onion? Scraps?

    Like Morecambe and Wise or Wallace and Gromit, fish and chips are a classic double act - and yet they started life as solo performers. And their roots are not as British as you might think.

    The story of the humble chip goes back to the 17th Century to either Belgium or France, depending who you believe.

    Oddly enough, the chip may have been invented as a substitute for fish, rather than an accompaniment. When the rivers froze over and nothing could be caught, resourceful housewives began cutting potatoes into fishy shapes and frying them as an alternative.

    Around the same time, fried fish was introduced into Britain by Jewish refugees from Portugal and Spain.

    The fish was usually sold by street sellers from large trays hung round their necks. Charles Dickens refers to an early fish shop or "fried fish warehouse" in Oliver Twist (1839) where the fish generally came with bread or baked potatoes.

    North or south?

    Who first had the bright idea to marry fish with chips remains the subject of fierce controversy and we will probably never know for sure. It is safe to say it was somewhere in England but arguments rage over whether it was up north or down south.

    Some credit a northern entrepreneur called John Lees. As early as 1863, it is believed he was selling fish and chips out of a wooden hut at Mossley market in industrial Lancashire.

    Others claim the first combined fish 'n' chip shop was actually opened by a Jewish immigrant, Joseph Malin, within the sound of Bow Bells in East London around 1860.

    However it came about, the marriage quickly caught on. At a time when working-class diets were bleak and unvaried, fish and chips were a tasty break from the norm.

    Outlets sprung up across the country and soon they were as much a part of Victorian England as steam trains and smog.

    Italian migrants passing through English towns and cities saw the growing queues and sensed a business opportunity, setting up shops in Scotland, Wales and Ireland.

    To keep prices down, portions were often wrapped in old newspaper - a practice that survived as late as the 1980s when it was ruled unsafe for food to come into contact with newspaper ink without grease-proof paper in between.

    It has even been suggested that fish and chips helped win World War I.

    According to Professor John Walton, author of Fish and Chips and the British Working Class, the government made safeguarding supplies a priority.

    "The cabinet knew it was vital to keep families on the home front in good heart," says Professor Walton. "Unlike the German regime that failed to keep its people well fed and that was one reason why Germany was defeated.

    "Historians can sometimes be a bit snooty about these things but fish and chips played a big part in bringing contentment and staving off disaffection."

    George Orwell in The Road to Wigan Pier (1937) put fish and chips first among the home comforts that helped keep the masses happy and "averted revolution".

    During World War II, ministers bent over backwards to make sure fish and chips were one of the few foods that were never rationed.

    These days, fish and chips are no longer king of the takeaway. Burgers, fried chicken, pizza, Indian and Chinese dishes all now outsell fried fish.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8419026.stm
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2013
  11. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    You Can Blame Portugal For Japanese Tempura

    Los Angeles Times
    Published 4:00 am, Wednesday, August 4, 1999

    England and Japan have a lot in common. For instance, they're both known for very formal social manners and, at the same time, for their love of nature.

    And England and Japan are both fond of deep-fried batter-coated fish: fish and chips and tempura, respectively. Could this, like their shared taste for plain cooking, be another consequence of being island nations?

    No, it's simpler than that. Both countries picked up the recipe from Portuguese visitors in the 16th and 17th centuries.

    It's pretty well known that Portuguese merchants introduced tempura to Japan. They were in the habit of eating fried fish during the religious seasons ("tempora") of abstinence from meat.

    Deep frying had been a standard way of cooking fish in Spain and Portugal for hundreds of years, as we know from the recipes for fried fish in egg batter that appear in 13th- century Spanish Arabic cookbooks.

    But it's not so well known how batter-fried fish became part of the English diet. It was brought by Portuguese Jews escaping the Inquisition. Having fled first to the Netherlands, they went on in the 16th and particularly the 17th centuries to England, where their religious freedom was assured.

    "Jewish fried fish" (which was originally served cold, by the way) was admired by 19th-century English food writers, and even Thomas Jefferson developed a taste for it; a recipe shows up in his personal recipe collection.

    There were a lot of fried-fish stands in 19th-century England. The combination of fish and chips arose in the 1860s, after Irish immigrants introduced the fried potato shop to London.
    http://www.sfgate.com/food/article/You-Can-Blame-Portugal-For-Japanese-Tempura-2916045.php
     
  12. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Great article Mike. Thanks. Then in 1982, he was practicing with Borg before he won the French Open at 17.
     
  13. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Scientists find neighbor star with 3 planets in life-friendly orbits

    Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:27pm EDT
    * Star located 22 light years from Earth

    * Planets in star's 'habitable zone' where water can exist

    By Irene Klotz


    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla., June 25 (Reuters) - A neighbor star has at least six planets in orbit, including three circling at the right distance for water to exist, a condition believed to be necessary for life, scientists said on Tuesday.

    Previously, the star known as Gliese 667C was found to be hosting three planets, one of which was located in its so-called "habitable zone" where temperatures could support liquid surface water. That planet and two newly found sibling worlds are bigger than Earth, but smaller than Neptune.

    "This is the first time that three such planets have been spotted orbiting in this zone in the same system," astronomer Paul Butler, with the Carnegie Institution in Washington, D.C., said in a statement.

    Scientists say the discovery of three planets in a star's habitable zone raises the odds of finding Earth-like worlds where conditions might have been suitable for life to evolve.

    "Instead of looking at 10 stars to look for a single potentially habitable planet, we now know we can look at just one star and have a high chance of finding several of them," astronomer Rory Barnes, with the University of Washington, said in a statement.

    Additional observations of Gliese 667C and a reanalysis of existing data showed it hosts at least six, and possibly, seven planets.

    The star is located relatively close to Earth, just 22 light years (129 trillion miles/207 trillion km) away. It is about one-third the size of the sun and the faintest star of a triple star system.

    In addition to the three well-positioned "super-Earths," two more planets may orbit on the fringe of the star's habitable zone and also could possibly support life.

    The research will be published this week in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. (Editing by Kevin Gray and Mohammad Zargham)
     
  14. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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  15. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Super moon and Wimby upsets...coincidence???
     
  16. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Great picture Sentinel.

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    Last edited: Jun 26, 2013
  17. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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  18. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    I've always wondered why Danes are such heavy drinkers...
     
  19. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    This is ironic, as many Danes joke about Swedes getting drunk in Copenhagen. Denmark has been less strict about drinking than Sweden for many years, so Danes are more inclined to have a beer with lunch or dinner.

    Swedes have come to Denmark to get drunk for quite some time, and many of the most drunk people you see in Copenhagen are Swedes. Also, Swedes are more inclined to be binge drinkers than Danes, according to Danes. :) Danes like to make jokes about Swedes passed out on Strøget on weekends.

    If you come to Copenhagen at night, you will see many people drinking. This doesn't mean that the people you see are Danes who go out drinking every night. Copenhagen is the biggest party destination in Scandinavia. In fact, a big percentage of the drunk people you see are Swedes who came to Copenhagen to drink.

    There was a popular Carlsberg commercial in the early 1990s regarding Swedish drinking in Copenhagen. It included hoped for Swedish lines such as: "I will not catcall after your girls. I will not fall asleep on Strøget. I will not pee in your parks. I will not throw up in Tivoli. And I promise I will take the last boat home."

    I think Swedes are more likely to drink in private parties, and it is less culturally acceptable to be drunk in public in Sweden. Contrary to popular belief, Swedish culture is pretty uptight. I think there are parallel dynamics between Swedish drinking and the cultural dynamics that lead to "Bushuru" in Japan.
     
  20. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Mike has his theory...mine is shorter: a shared border with Germany during the 20th century could make a nation a bit nervous so a bit of the booze takes the edge off.

    On the flip side, we here in the U.S. are sooooo relaxed about our neighbors to the north that it has allowed nearby Seattle to become our Caffeine Capital!
     
  21. Roger Wawrinka

    Roger Wawrinka Professional

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    The Wimbledon zip code is SW19
     
  22. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    SW19...tell that to one-half of your username!

    "You cannot be serious!"
     
  23. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Nanna Bryndís Hilmarsdóttir was born in Garður.
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  24. Roger Wawrinka

    Roger Wawrinka Professional

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    Hahaha nice one!:)
     
  25. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Hingis and Kournikova are surprisingly short in person, but Elena Dementieva is much taller than most people would expect. The listed heights of WTA players tends to be exaggerated for shorter players and minimized for taller players.

    GRATUITOUS ANNA KOURNIKOVA PHOTO
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    Last edited: Jun 29, 2013
  26. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Somehow, in all my very numerous musings concerning AK, her height or lack of it has never entered my poor little mind.
     
  27. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    The Tour de France is cycling through Corsica...why did Napoleon ever leave that gorgeous island???
     
  28. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    19 is in honor of how many slams your first name will win before he retires. ;)
     
  29. mcpon

    mcpon New User

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    I love watermelon.
     
  30. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I have recently been watching The Beatles Anthology on DVD. The level of madness at the Shea Stadium concert is hard to comprehend.

    How could so many people reach such a level of absolute hysteria for a rock band? The footage is a fascinating study in crowd dynamics. It must have been interesting to have seen that in person.
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  31. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Young music fans, particularly of the female persuasion, have always been subject to mass hysteria...from Sinatra to the current Biebermania. That being said, The Beatles did take it to another level...the right guys with the right looks and sound at a very changing time in world culture!
     
  32. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    I absolutely cannot stand going on a break. Half an hour in I just want to get back to work, even though it's killing my back.
     
  33. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061012094818.htm

     
  34. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Ravens Remember and Greet You Accordingly
    APR 19, 2012 03:10 PM ET // BY JENNIFER VIEGAS

    When you go outside, do the birds sound happy or angry when they see you? New research has found that at least one group of birds, ravens, remembers prior interactions with people and varies calls based on those earlier experiences.

    So it's not too far-fetched to think that if you bothered a bird some time ago, the bird might unleash the avian version of swearing the next time you approach.

    The research, published in Current Biology, adds to the growing body of evidence that birds remember the appearance and voices of individuals, along with their prior encounters with them. Last year we told you how crows don't forget faces, for example.

    We take such skills for granted in humans. In daily life, it's a given that we remember the faces and voices of multiple known individuals. Other studies show that different mammals can do the same thing.

    If you want a lifelong buddy, you might consider getting a horse, since they remember their human friends and act accordingly. We humans can be pretty nasty and complicated with each other at times, but give a horse a carrot and a head pat for a while and you'll receive near-guaranteed kindness in return.

    Markus Boeckle and Thomas Bugnyar from the department of cognitive biology at the University of Vienna demonstrate in their new study that ravens differentiate individuals based on familiarity. They also discovered that ravens memorize relationship bonds and affiliations.

    The findings revealed that ravens change their call characteristics depending on whether they hear former "friends" or "foes." The study only covered up to three years, but bird memory may extend beyond that time.

    So what does an angry bird sound like? When listening to a foe, a raven responds with a call that's lower than normal in tone and starts to include "rougher characteristics." The switch from the bird version of "Hey! How are you?" to "Buzz off!" is similar to how we communicate such differences in our speech.

    Strangers get an even rougher response from ravens. This is the equivalent of a person yelling, "Who are you?," if a stranger bangs on the door. There's an interesting scientific phenomenon behind having a louder, lower and rougher-sounding response.

    All of those qualities make the individual sound bigger in size. You may not consciously be doing that when you yell, but the effect is the same. Ravens similarly try to sound tough and large around strangers.
    http://news.discovery.com/animals/ravens-remember-you-120419.htm

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  35. Hood_Man

    Hood_Man Legend

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  36. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    Test post from my new phone. Mighty impressed by its smoothness!
     
  37. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Happy 4th of July guys!

     
  38. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    By a strong margin, I prefer Del Mar to La Jolla.
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  39. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Is there any point in looking for relevant news on American television anymore? Currently, it seems to be only about the self-defense trial on every channel throughout the day.

    Issues like the situation in Egypt or Snowden extradition are being forgotten. I need to turn to Russian news, BBC, PBS, or German news to get the latest about other issues.

    I was in Dublin and Derry during the Simpson chase that shifted American news to an entertainment genre. In law, there is a concept of fiduciary responsibility. I wish that the American news media embraced this concept.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2013
  40. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    The State vs. Zimmerman case perfectly defines the title of this thread. If you think you are washed under by this case's media tsunami, imagine my plight living right where it's going on.

    Seminole County is the second-richest county per capita in the state, despite the fact the area where the incident happened is surrounded by a vast, economically-depressed neighborhood. As the Orlando metro area expands, the more affluent are moving closer to blighted areas. It is only surprising that it took so long for an event such as this to happen. My hometown has slowly gravitated towards a gated apartheid. Has yours?
     
  41. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    2013 Wimbledon Final Nearly Matches 1980 Wimbledon Final U.K. T.V. Ratings

    Wimbledon Final Smashes 2013 TV Record in U.K.

     
  42. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    Today during lunch I discovered that Murphy's law is a true thing. Anything that could go wrong did. God, that was brutal.
     
  43. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Wow, what did you have for lunch? I had lunch at a Hunan restaurant and everything went pretty well.
     
  44. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    When traveling under a false passport, it is important to have meticulously orchestrated pocket litter.
     
  45. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Perhaps it's too soon to consider this but, in a little bit less than 6.5 years will we all have perfect vision???
     
  46. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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  47. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I like the way Nanna Bryndís Hilmarsdóttir sings.
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  48. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I once played a set with Elena Likhovtseva. She was much better than me.
     
  49. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    CraigyFerg is really gearing up with the guest lists...he had The Goo Goo Dolls on the show tonight!

    I really love that guy...he deserves all his success! If you want to read some good stuff, try either of his two very different works. Not your everyday talk show host!
     
  50. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I miss Anna Chakvetadze being on the WTA tour.
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