Useless information thread

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by forzainter, Oct 17, 2007.

  1. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Craig Ferguson has the late night show that I enjoy the most. Letterman and Conan are okay, but Ferguson has the show that I most like to watch.
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    Last edited: Jul 20, 2013
  2. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    I just stumbled over the supposedly brutal Ghosts 'n Goblins for the NES in a store. It had to be bought.
     
  3. BLX_Andy

    BLX_Andy Professional

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    I broke 5 controllers over two years playing Uncharted 3 and Call of Duty Modern Warfare 3 online.
     
  4. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    As a puppy, my Cocker Spaniel destroyed at least four remote controls for my TV...I'm still stumped why plastic could be so tasty to him. As an adult, he has more conventional tastes...dog food and table scraps!
     
  5. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    I'm sure these two fellows will have much fun with the breaking news of the baby Prince's birth on tonight's show...if they're not in reruns this week.
     
  6. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/tennis/news/20130722/novak-djokovic-diet-book.ap/


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  7. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    Marmite. I hate it.
     
  8. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    In real life, the semi-comedic killer in "Diamonds Are Forever", Mr. Wint and George McFly, Marty's dad in "Back To The Future", are related. Actors Bruce and Crispin Glover are father and son.
     
  9. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    There have been many claims as to who was Ian Fleming's real-life inspiration for the James Bond character, but given the fact that spy agencies like their officers, agents, and assets to be clandestine and surreptitious, unless a decoy or provocateur, being the inspiration for Bond might not be such a good thing. In the spy world, agencies generally like to get jobs done with no one noticing, though that world would not be nearly as entertaining or fun as Bond on film.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2013
  10. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Ringo Starr's wife, Barbara Bach, once had a pretty big role in a Bond film.
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  11. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    ^^^The lucky Lad from Liverpool met her while filming another film, that classic:twisted:, "Caveman". They became involved, despite existing relationships, fell in love, avoided death in a car crash (she still wears jewelry containing bits of the Mercedes windshield),and eventually married in the same building (London Marylebone Registry) as Paul and Linda McCartney signed their license.

    They have remained together, almost inseparable, for 30+ years...they even convinced the rehab facility they enrolled in to modify their rules to avoid separation. Both conquered severe alcohol and cocaine dependecies and are clean and sober for more than two decades. Barbara even went back to school and has a Master's degree in psychology.
     
  12. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    LOL! Has there ever been a more appropriately named serial self-sexting idiot than this guy Weiner???:twisted:
     
  13. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Marmite. I love it.
     
  14. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Men At Work preferred Vegemite!
     
  15. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    I find Louis Litt very funny. And also that ears guy ;)
     
  16. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Marmite: Denmark says spread could be illegal
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-13536479

    It is well known that Marmite is a gateway drug to surströmming. Marmite and surströmming are the sort of culinary catalysts that soon cause civilizations to unravel. Left unchecked by legislation, mothers will be feeding infants a blended mixture of the two, leading to a nation ripe for insurrection when the infants grow to adulthood.
     
  17. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Lars Ulrich has a disproportionately large head.
     
  18. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    http://oddstuffmagazine.com/50-really-weird-facts-about-your-body.html

     
  19. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I am pretty sure I exceeded this when I hung out with Marloes Horst.
     
  20. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    From a blog:

    I don't know why it is that some actors are so much more, well, watchable, for lack of a better word, than other actors. It's an intangible thing. It, in fact, makes no sense sometimes. I personally know some really fine actors that bore me. And I know some actors with really small ranges, not terribly proficient, really, but absolutely electric on stage. It's a mystery, as the line goes in Shakespeare In Love. And it is. I only know that some actors simply command audience attention and others don't.

    My friend and former acting teacher, Michael Moriarty, told me something interesting once. He said one of the reasons he never became a major movie star was because his head wasn't big enough. He said he had a theory that one of the prerequisites to becoming a movie star was a big head. Literally. He said, DeNiro...big head. Nicholson...big head. Katherine Hepburn...HUGE head. Nick Nolte...big head. Streep...very big head. He said, as far as he could discern, there were no exceptions to this rule. He told me that often times, on screen, one couldn't really see this. But up close, in person, there was a direct correlation between stardom and the physical size of one's head. Fascinating. And Michael knew and worked with all of those people.

    Angie, who spent over twenty years as a casting associate in this town, seconds his opinion. She tells of people she knew and met over the years with the same observation. Anthony Hopkins...big head. Richard Dreyfuss...big head.

    Michael said of course one has to also be a good actor but coupling that with having a big head usually means stardom.

    It sounds utterly ludicrous, but I think there's some truth to it.

    But that's movie stuff.

    http://lasttangoinlosangeles.blogspot.com/2010/09/big-head-theory.html
     
  21. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Torben Ulrich looked like a hippie when he played. I would like to see footage of him playing, but there is not much out there.
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  22. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Awsome Mike B. He's wielding that metal Yonex from back then. He has always seemed like an interesting guy to me as well! Mr. Torben Ulrich, while being such a unique tennis player, is also the father of Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich.

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  23. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Torben is also the oldest player to have played a Davis Cup match (48 years, 11 months).
     
  24. Steffi-forever

    Steffi-forever Semi-Pro

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    Madonna's Superbowl half-time show in 2012 was the most viewed programs of all-time in the United States with over 114 million viewers.
     
  25. Steffi-forever

    Steffi-forever Semi-Pro

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    In 2001, the Cannes film festival thought « Le Fabuleux Destin d'Amélie Poulain » was completely rubbish and removed it from the competition. When the movie was released a few months later, it became an instant classic!
     
  26. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Always thought Russell was the odd one in the failed BrandPerry couple; not so sure after viewing an "Ellen Show" rerun where Katy plays in drag a game-show host in a "Grab Ellen's Butt" skit. Hilarious!
     
  27. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    Oh Rock, why are you shitfaced. What are you trying to forget? Something's wrong. Please respond, brain!
     
  28. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Last I heard, Torben Ulrich lives in Marin. Here is an old, but interesting, article about him:
    http://www.torbenulrich.com/ballplaying/ballplaying4d3.htm

    The Zen Master of Tennis
    Renaissance athlete Torben Ulrich hits balls against the wall,
    writes for newspapers, and plays jazz

    By Frank Wetzel

    WHEN AT LAST YOU CLIMB A PEAK IN Tibet to ask the proverbial guru there the meaning of existence, I know whom you will find: Torben Ulrich. No need to climb the Himalayas, however. You may see Ulrich, perhaps mistake him for a street person, jogging (no, running) in downtown Seattle. His wispy beard, streaked with gray, reaches halfway to his waist. His long hair is tied behind his head in a pony tail. What sets Ulrich apart is the grace of his movement; it is instantly clear that he marches to a different drummer. Except that he doesn't really march. Rather, he glides, swoops, waltzes, skates, and sometimes gavottes to music he alone can hear.

    At Ralph's Deli on Fourth Avenue, where he often eats, he looks like Central Casting's choice for the role of writer, filmmaker, painter, or ascetic Eastern mystic-all of which he is. Not until you see him at nearby Denny Regrade Park at Third and Bell, hitting a tennis ball against the wall, do you get a clue to his best-known identity: a worldclass tennis player who played at Wimbledon for 20 years and participated in 100 Davis Cup matches for his native Denmark.

    Ulrich may be the only person who sees the artistic possibilities in batting a tennis ball against a wall. In 1988, with codirector Gil de Kermadec, he made a 45-minutr. film for the French Tennis Federation and the French Ministry of Sports called La "Balle au Mur -- roughly, the ball and the wall. Interspersed with earnest discussions by such tennis luminaries as Ivan Lendl, Ken Rosewall, Martina Navratilova, and Rod Laver on the value of hitting against walls (rhythm, footwork, consistency, eye-hand coordination) are scenes of Ulrich playing against a variety of backstops: rough walls, smooth walls, tall walls. Against garbage cans; a departing bus, along an airport's moving walkway. Sometimes he substitutes a furled umbrella for a racket.

    In the film's final scene, Ulrich is riding on the Paris Metro. Dressed in topcoat and fedora, he reaches under his coat, draws out a racket, and begins hitting a ball against the car window. Other passengers turn to stare. Then, with fine Gallic shrugs, they too pullout their rackets and start hitting.

    During that time of life when athletes are generally in their prime-from late teens to early 4Os-tennis was more than incidental to Ulrich's life, but still ranked only third in his priorities. First came music; he played clarinet from Munich to Monte Carlo in highly regarded New Orleans-style jazz groups.

    Then came journalism: music reviews or his daily column for the Danish newspaper Politiken. Finally came tournaments.

    Those were the days of shamateur tennis. Pompous officials fought to maintain the sport's hoity-toity, dress-for-dinner snobbishness. Players were forbidden to accept prize money; despite the opposition of Ulrich's father, an advertising executive who was president of the Danish Lawn Tennis Association and a participant in 74 Davis Cup matches, the umbrella Danish sports authority limited participation in tournaments abroad to 56 days per year.

    So, in those days, Ulrich was at best a part-time player. Often he would stay up all night listening to music (for a time he and friends owned their own jazz; club), go directly to the newspaper in the morning to write a review or his daily column, then. sometimes near exhaustion, drag himself off to a match.

    He was a late-blooming phenomenon, the Satchel Paige of tennis. Not until he was in his 40s did Ulrich become a recognized world champion. In 1976, he won the international Grand Masters championship for men 45 and older, sweeping nine of the circuit's 14 events that year against top players that included Pancho Gonzales, Vic Seixas, Pancho Segura, and Frank Sedgeman (Rosewall and Laver joined the Masters later). Ulrich's winnings in 1976 were $52,715, when that was big money.


    GROWING UP in Copenhagen, Ulrich was a promising skater and soccer and table tennis player. During the German occupation in World War II, his maternal grandparents, who were Jewish, escaped to Sweden hidden under a pile of coal in the hold of a ship. Ulrich, his mother, and his brother attempted to follow but were apprehended and interned. Because they were only part Jewish, Ulrich's father managed to win their release in a few days.

    The family eventually escaped to Sweden. There, under the protection of King Gustavus V, who knew his father, Ulrich started to play tennis regularly. He first played at the All-England Club in 1945 and in the Wimbledon tournament in 1948, returning to the latter for the next 20 years. Several times in the course of his hundred or so Davis Cup matches, he led the Danes to the European finals. He played both singles and doubles; his partners included his brother Jørgen, Kurt Nielsen, Jan Leschly, and Sven Davidson. The team won a number of tourneys, including the German, French Indoors, and British hard court.

    His successes during this period notwithstanding, Ulrich was more journalist than athlete until 1961. Then, in an outrageous. ceremony mocking the amateur rules of the time, he solemnly signed a professional contract-for 17 cents. Free at last to concentrate on tennis, and at 41 much older than his opponents, he joined the World Championship Tennis circuit.. He looked, in the words of a Sports Illustrated profile by Mark Kram, "like a tired old monk bringing up the end of a procession." Still, Kram wrote, players muttered when they saw Ulrich's name opposite theirs in the draw, inwardly cursing his stamina and touch, the spin that "stops a ball dead, makes it break right or left, or sends it shooting-low and deep off the canvas or grass."

    While on the circuit, Ulrich occasionally visited Seattle. In the I 970s, David Sennett, tennis director at the Mill Creek Tennis Club, invited him to represent the club as a touring professional. Ulrich accepted, occupying a condominium at Mill Creek several times a year while here to teach clinics. A more compelling reason for his residency in Seattle had to do with a telephone interview that had been conducted for a magazine article a year before by Molly Martin, an editor at The Seattle Times. The article somehow was never written, but Martin has been Ulrich's companion for the past ten years.


    ULRICH BECAME interested in New Orleans jazz when only 9 or 10 years old, and music still plays a vital part in his life. His son Lars is the drummer in the heavy metal group Metallica. Lars' godfather was the late jazz saxophonist Dexter Gordon, star of the movie 'Round Midnight and a former resident of Copenhagen.

    Years ago, as Louis Armstrong was arriving by ferry from Sweden, Ulrich and his jazz band met him at a Copenhagen wharf, playing such" standards as "That's When I Come Back to You," "Big Butter and Egg Man," and other New Orleans favorites, from the back of a truck. Satchmo, delighted, climbed up and sang along. Ulrich later played behind Armstrong in more formal settings, and he continues to follow music closely, weaving news about jazz into his reporting of the American scene for Danish newspapers.

    A recent full-page article he wrote for Information, a Danish daily, was titled "Where Pies Go When They Die," about Twin Peaks, the TV show introduced this season to immediate popularity in Europe. Other writings reflect on more serious aspects of America. Long before the recent hue and cry about exploitation of AfricanAmericans in collegiate sports, for example, Ulrich was worrying in print about the loss of dignity of black college athletes who didn't make it into professional sports and fell back into the ghetto.

    A book, No Ball to Speak Of, is nearing publication. Its left-hand pages, written in English, are paradoxical and epigrammatic. On the right are prose explanations in Danish. Ulrich is doing the book's illustrations, too. He lays out sheets of rice paper, dips a jump rope into paint, and makes one or two energetic skips, the rope leaving semicircular swirls of paint on the paper. He randomly (or so it seems) adds a partial outline of a racket's frame or butt. Then he may drop a paint-soaked ball onto the paper several times. The paintings have been exhibited in Copenhagen, Paris, New York, Los Angeles, Houston, and even Woodstock.

    Torben and Martin live downtown, in a tiny apartment that reflects their lives. There are no chairs, couches, or beds. The dominant feature is a Buddhist shrine-paintings on the wall above a table laden with candies and incense. Exercise equipment appears in odd places (Tennis USA once called Ulrich "possibly the finest conditioned athlete for his age in the world," and he has : the body of a man half his age ). The dining table rests on a trampoline, just a few inches off the floor. In the bedroom is a device for suspending oneself upside down by the ankles, perhaps in accord with the observation of Gene Scott, a one-time colleague on the tennis tour, that ." Ulrich sees everything upside down." Tucked into the bedroom is a long sheet of heavy plastic that is stretched across the floor as a surface for a sliding, side-to-side, skating-type exercise done in stocking feet; this is designed to enhance lateral movement. Next to it is a small, ball-mounted-balancing platform intended to strengthen the knees.
     
  29. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    CONTINUED:

    Ulrich has been described as disarming and charming, an international bohemian, a bearded eternal transient, always confusing. I find him very European. He greets you with a hug, and takes your arm while walking. As we sit at the Place Pigalle restaurant in the Market, he gets up from the table to demonstrate a tennis motion, oblivious of customers and waiters. He speaks softly, precisely, effusively. Knowing he studied Latin, and presuming that in addition to English and Danish he speaks Swedish, French, and German, I ask if he speaks them all fluently. "Not Latin," he replies.

    BUDDHISM HAS BEEN expanding as the focus of Ulrich's life ever since his school days in Sweden. The focus intensified progressively during the '50s, '60s, and '70s, and even more so in the '80s. He has studied in India and Tibet, and demonstrated his intense personal interest in Buddhism in 1987 by repeatedly prostrating himself, day after day, in an up-and-down bowing motion, while making his way from the Center for Tibetan Buddhism in Copenhagen to a similar center near Rf1Jedby-a distance of more than 90 miles. Ulrich said the trek was meant as a gesture of respect for Tenga Rinpoche, his Tibetan teacher. He adds that such repetition gradually replaces monotony "by a new understanding of the unending renewal of everything living: the fields, the harvest, the playing rules -- and one's own steps.

    ''In this way, also, there can be no talk about the goal or finish line as something a good ways down the road. It's at all times right at hand, just like the obstacles and the disturbances."

    Ulrich's approach to athletic competition obviously differs from the traditional Western view, "where one is trying to stand out at the expense of the surroundings. "There is no division between eating, sleeping, going to the john, or doing athletics. It's all the same. Having said that, however, it's of course also completely different. In that spaciousness in which it is the same, it also becomes completely different," he told an interviewer.

    Well, you needn't understand Ulrich to appreciate him.

    The consummate competitive athlete and studious Buddhist fully recognizes the dichotomy between the two. A brochure on one of Ulrich's recent lectures at the Omega Institute for Holistic Studies in New York state speaks of his observations on the "irreconcilable philosophy of spiritual practice and competitive sports." It says he "cuts through both athletic materialism and New Age romance."

    This reconciling of Buddhism's compassion and Western competitiveness seems successful. Last summer I watched Ulrich play in a tournament at the Seattle Tennis Club (where he won the national 60s division for the second year without losing a set). About to receive serve, he interrupted the match to carry an insect from the court to safety on the sidelines. Years before, with Ulrich ahead of John Newcombe by two sets at Forest Hills, a butterfly flew into his face. The match seemed to turn after that, and Ulrich lost. Discussing the incident later, he quoted the Taoist philosopher Chuang-tzu: "Was I then a man dreaming I was a butterfly, or am I now a butterfly dreaming I was a man?"

    Copyright 1991 by Seattle Weekly. Posted with permission.

    Torben's official site:
    http://www.torbenulrich.com/ballplaying/ballplaying4d3.htm
     
  30. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    ^^^Mike, this is not "useless information"!
     
  31. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    Torben seems awesome.
     
  32. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Agreed! Great article Mike B. on Torben.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i75_NDhJdvE (Torben U. in a experimental video with him hitting on a wall.)

     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2013
  33. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Someone's once again hit my little black (stray) dog (one year old female) in the eye.

    It's been raining recently, and she has this habit of climbing onto cars and sitting on top. This leaves big muddy paw prints on the cars. I just found her, she's been hiding all day, and one eye is not opening. So that explains the scream I heard this morning. In the winters she began climbing onto cars for the warmth of the car engine. Now it seems she does it for fear of the other larger dogs, or perhaps because she gets more air, or a good view.
     
  34. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Sorry to hear about your stray dog, Sentinel. Anyone who would hit a dog for leaving paw prints on their car is below the standards to qualify as human.
     
  35. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Vera Zvonareva graduated from the Diplomatic Academy
    June 27, 2013

    On June 25 Vera Zvonareva graduated from the Diplomatic Academy of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in her home Russia, in the domain of international economic relations.

    The former world No.2, currently down to No.222, started the 2012 season ranked seventh, but a shoulder injury and illness ruined her year and following her loss to Serena Williams at the London Olympics she hung up her racquet for the time being.

    In February this year she had surgery on her right shoulder, and she's still rehabilitating.
    http://www.womenstennisblog.com/2013/06/27/vera-zvonareva-graduated-from-the-diplomatic-academy/

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    Last edited: Jul 29, 2013
  36. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    I think that Sweden needs more players with really good serves in order to reach the stage of an excellent tennis nation once again.
     
  37. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    I agree Rock Strongo. I bet they'll have some more great players in the future.

    Sentinel, I'm sorry to hear about your dog. I hope she feels better. That's horrible. I can't stand any cruelty to animals.

    The decimal system was invented in India in approximately 100 B.C. The concept of zero as a number is also attributed to India

    The mango is the national fruit of India is the mango.

    The first recorded account of plastic surgery is found in ancient Indian Sanskrit texts.
     
  38. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    ^ I thought the Arabs were the first to use the zero.

    Had no idea mangoes were our national fruit, or that we had one.
     
  39. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    ^^^I know you guys have a national vegetable...he contributes all too often on this board!:twisted:
     
  40. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    If sober at a party, you're the one who gets to clean things up.
     
  41. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Mangoes are good! Do you like mango pickle? I can't live without it lol..Most of my friends would faint if they tried it. As this article mentions, the history of zero is complicated. It was invented in different parts of the world independently.

    http://www.ams.org/samplings/feature-column/fcarc-india-zero

     
  42. jonestim

    jonestim Professional

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    Due to the shape of the North American Elk's esophagus. even if it could speak, it could not pronounce the word lasagna.
     
  43. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    epic man epic
    I didn't know that half-baked vegetable was our national one :D !!! That vegetable seems to be quite resistant to "droughts", too, and proliferates much like a weed. Are you sure you didn't mean National Weed ?
     
  44. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    Yes, he probably has an ancient collection of Boast brand tenniswear...you know, the brand whose logo resembled a pot leaf. For all I know, he may even play with a Weed racquet!:twisted:
     
  45. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    What is mango pickle? Useless information: it is important to have hot mango chutney and hot lime relish in the refrigerator.

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  46. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    Could a moose order lasagna at a restaurant? If not, would pronouncing eggplant parmesan be more of a problem for an elk or a moose? Would they go hungry at an Italian restaurant?
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  47. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Intereresting. I've tasted varieties of the above, such as Sweet Mango Chutney..but this is what mango pickle looks like. It goes so well with a proper south Indian vegetarian meal. Extremely hot and spicy, with salt, spices..you can refrigerate it, but it tastes great for a long time. I'm vegetarian and eat a lot of Indian, Mexican, and Italian food, but mostly Indian. Lots of vegetables, fruits, breads, pasta, rice, and spices. There's also lime, lemon, and green chili pickle for example. You should try it slowly.

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  48. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Semi-Pro

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    I eat vegetarian Indian food very, very often, and will have to give this a try.
     
  49. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Eat it mixed with something with each spoon, like rice or naan. It's one of my favorite things on the planet. I go for the non vinegar variety, but there try something like Bedekar's or Mother's if you can get it. You'll really enjoy it! Thanks.

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  50. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    You guys are making me hungry as I'm stuck at home on a rainy night!

    There is an affordable Indian buffet available for lunch near my work zone. I may try it soon. They feature dishes from the northern regions. What would you recommend that's easy on the palate...I don't eat real spicy food often??? There are several veggie options and about five versions of chicken curries (Tandoori, Biryani, Tikki Masala are a few I remember)????
     

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