Using anger to motivate?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Nikeman0092, Jul 26, 2004.

  1. Nikeman0092

    Nikeman0092 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2004
    Messages:
    137
    This weekend I played in a tournament and in the semis found a hard match. I had just lost the first set 6-2 and in the first game of the second set lost control. After watching yet another of his drop shots dribble over the net on the third bounce I launched it over the fence. The next point I hit a return winner and some how used the anger from the point before and relesed it on my shot. I ended up winning the set 6-1 and winning the match in three. Is using built up anger in a positive way a good way of playing or is it risky?
     
  2. GrahamIsSuper

    GrahamIsSuper Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    Messages:
    504
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    Too risky. If you win a couple of points, good for you. It'd be too easy for him to get back in it. If you lost just 1 point while you're mad, you're going to lose more...lots more.

    1 lost point could put that anger over the top and out of control. Stay positive. Intensity and Anger are closely related, but intensity is controlled aggression.
     
  3. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    Yeah I would agree with Graham. Having anger is risky and could backfire and deflate you if you dont have immediate success.

    Intensity is different from anger. Intensity is more positive to your game. It also does not consume as much energy. It take a lot of energy to stay angry.
     
  4. Nikeman0092

    Nikeman0092 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2004
    Messages:
    137
    It wasn't just that one point. Pretty much the whole first set I hit a couple of returns in the net.
     
  5. GrahamIsSuper

    GrahamIsSuper Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    Messages:
    504
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    Regardless of that, if he had hit some winners off you, I can almost guarantee you're going to strart throwing things. You have to stay positive and relaxed almost all the time. Watch the Pro's play. They use intensity in their matches, but you almost never see them start yelling. Anger is too easy to take advantage of.
     
  6. speedofpain88

    speedofpain88 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    357
    I'd have to disagree. I play best when I'm mad (however that doesn't mean my attitude is negative, the intensity level just skyrockets). This is not only for tennis. For me it also applies for basketball and soccer. At state quarter-finals for basketball this year I got fouled really hard across the face, no foul was called, the guy that did it made a comment that pissed me off even more.

    I ended the game with 47 points ... and the guy that had originally fouled me ended up fouling out with 10 minutes to go. The idea should be to not be blinded by your anger but use it to fuel your intensity. It can be risky if it's uncontrolled rage though.

    As far as the pros, remember when Pete was crying at the Aussie Open over his dying coach and Courier made a remark that he said was meant to loosen Pete up ... well Pete thought he was mocking him and the anger just turned on inside Pete and he dominated the match from that point on. He was down 2 sets and he used the anger to get him out of the hole.
     
  7. Tim Tiger Henman

    Tim Tiger Henman Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2004
    Messages:
    265
    Horses for courses.
    It depends on the personality of the player. Look at Mac. Anger was like Oxygen to him. It was like he couldn't even get out of bed in the morning if he didn't get mad at someone first!

    But people like him and Conners are the excpetion to the rule. Look at the game nowadays. Most players spend their time controlling and down-playing their arousal levels. Tennis has just gotten too professional. Getting mad won't cut it nowadays. Every match already has so much riding on it that you don't need even more pressure.

    What you need is a combination of desire/motivation to win (ganas) and ability to relax and perform at your peak under pressure. Its a delicate balancing act, which you as an athlete are constantly fine-tuning. Too much arousal and you will tank. Too little and you won't be pumped up to play.

    I'm a high arousal kind of guy. That means that most of the time I spend in a match I try to get as relaxed as possible. But others are low-arousal and need to pump themselves up, either by getting mad at themselves or others.

    Just do a search for arousal theory and you'll get some interesting reference up.
     
  8. Tim Tennis

    Tim Tennis Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2004
    Messages:
    1,073
    Location:
    Charleston, TN
    So Nikeman, how did you do in the finals? I am not too sure that I can go along with hitting the ball over the fense. I think you have to be careful as to how you direct your anger. If you are mad at yourself for missing easy shots, double faulting, or not getting to the ball, fine, but if you are directing this anger towards your opponent in terms of language, comments, body language, that is another matter. You have to make sure that it does not take the form of poor sportsmanship.

    I guess I have been on both sides of the coin. Mad at myself for missing easy shots, just being lazy on some shots or just not competing well. Angry / Mad at my opponent for what I perceive as a number of obvious bad line calls and sometimes just their attitude can **** you off. I guess in both cases the anger has worked for and against me. It all just depends on how well I am able to direct and control all of that energy.

    You got to love the game.
     
  9. Power Game

    Power Game Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Messages:
    1,151
    Sure anger can motivate. Just ask Safin. He smashes racquets then you see him play unbelievable tennis. Of course it dosn't work all the time
     
  10. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2004
    Messages:
    4,405
    Location:
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Sometimes players will try to initimidate their opponent with their anger. Sometimes the other player will start playing with fear and will play worse then and lose to the angry madman.

    If my opponent launched a ball over the fence, I would stop playing until he had calmed himself back down. He would need to go get the ball first. I would probably take a water break and try to stay in control of the situation rather than feel like he is in control now trying to change the momentum of the match. If my opponent said we still had two balls and he wasn't going to get the third, I would take my sweet time and go get it myself and make him wait.

    Anger can be good and bad. Stay within the rules of the game though and don't hit the ball over the fence.
     
  11. Nikeman0092

    Nikeman0092 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2004
    Messages:
    137
    I lost the finals in three sets but wasn't very mad. Thats why I was wondering maybe I wasn't into the match enough.
     
  12. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2004
    Messages:
    4,405
    Location:
    Auckland, New Zealand
    You are tapping into to your adrenaline to give yourself more energy and more focus by becoming angry. Too much anger and you will start to lose that focus again though. It's better just to verbally pump yourself up (get mad at yourself a little) without resorting to spiking balls and throwing racquets around, although you can intimidate opponents that way but it's not very respectful and you won't gain any friends acting that way.
     
  13. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    I think this is a bunch of BS. Anger in tennis is a doubled edge sword. I dont give a darn what happened at the Aussie Open with Pete. Pete''s career of controlled focus was paramount to your feeble example.

    You look at the top players and when is it that they fall apart? when they get angry at a call, cant let it go, then they drop points.

    Anger is not a good thing for tennis players even if Mac used it. The overwhelming majority of tennis players do not use anger to motivate them. If it takes someone to hit you in the face to get you going, or you flub an easy shot, or have someone rifle a ball at your chest, you have a concentration problem.

    Anger from frustration or failure can have a negative effect on performance. For example, a soccer player who has been held by an opponent might become angry and attempt to retaliate by taking a swing at the opponent. Retaliation causes an automatic shift of attentional focus from the game to the opponent. As a result of the increased arousal and the break in concentration, performance suffers (Husman & Silva, 1980).

    Another scenario is a basketball player who is fouled, but receives no call from the officials. If the fouled player thinks of retaliating, concentration breaks and performance drops. Athletes, in general, should learn one or more concentration strategies to either prevent a break in concentration or help them refocus when concentration breaks.

    Players play best when they are relaxed and focused on the point and the ball - period. Anger is very difficult to maintain the entire match. It is an energy drainer.
     
  14. Camilio Pascual

    Camilio Pascual Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    1,822
    Anger is a tricky thing to use at best. Mac sometimes played better, but often played worse after his outbursts. During the latter part of Becker's career, he lost his temper very often. I don't believe I ever saw him get angry and end up winning the match. He played much worse after his outbursts.
    Better to get the other guy angry. I call my best anger inducing schtick, "Jerry Lewis Does Wimbledon." Haven't done it for years, but that's a whole other story.
     
  15. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2004
    Messages:
    4,405
    Location:
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Often if an opponent gets angry, if you can just keep the pressure up and win a few more points and a game more or two, they will resign themselves to losing. I am the same way when I get too upset in a match so I try to not to get too upset when I am losing since it usually only gets worse, but sometimes you do need to wake yourself up and start playing with focus to your potential but I think playing with intensity is better than playing (or driving) angry as most of the others have said. My old doubles partner used to get get mad when things weren't going exactly as planned and his game would go to crap and I would have to calm him back down so we didn't get too far behind before we turned things around.
     
  16. TennsDog

    TennsDog Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2004
    Messages:
    2,277
    I love using anger and frustration on my serve. Sometimes it works and I can hit an ace on the next shot, or I can double fault the rest of the game. No doubt, it is very risky. It is probably not a good thing to do, but I think it can be beneficial to at least let it rip the next point even if you lose. It feels good to blast it be it a serve or return. The more of a power game you have to start with the better it will work for you. It may also help, too, because when you are mad you are not thinking about your shots, you are just hitting which is one key to playing great.
     
  17. speedofpain88

    speedofpain88 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    357
    Say whatever you want, but it works for me. I didn't say that I needed anger to play my best, but I have never noticed it hurting my game.

    People are different, so please don't tell me that it's BS, I was saying that it works for me and I gave an example of when it worked for someone else. I didn't say it would work for everyone else all the time.

    As for basketball, Michael Jordan had some of his best games when he was angry. Against Detroit in'90 Pippen got hit hard and no foul was called, Mike took it personally and torched the Pistons for 50 points. I can give so many more examples from basketball. AI, Kobe, Shaq, Tracy.
     
  18. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2004
    Messages:
    4,405
    Location:
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Yep, I try to tap into my adrenaline usually when serving and try to say to my opponent that he cannot handle what I have got and then bring the 105-110 mph heater right at him. I am sure the adrenaline gives the serve a 5-10 mph boost and even helps with focus and getting a higher percentage in. I don't really think of it as anger as just going out and proving that I am bigger and better than my opponent and that their serve doesn't match up to mine which can be a little bit intimidating. Roddick does the same thing at the pro level as do all the other big servers. They try to intimidate and overwhelm and get a little juiced doing so.
     
  19. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2004
    Messages:
    4,405
    Location:
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Jordan also played big when he was sick since then he probably focused even more and maybe took more shots to keep his focus on the game and not his sickness. I think anger can be good at times if it's kept under some control and not used too often. Like I am saying it's about that adrenaline boost that allows you to do things that you don't ordinarily do.

    Not sure why people are told they are full of BS when their opinions don't agree. I agree that anger is mostly a bad thing on the tennis court but I have seen instances where it helped me or where my opponent played better after he got angry but I would say 80-90% of the time it's self-destructive to a tennis player.
     
  20. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    Actually, you disagreed in your first post which is saying we are not right and anger works.

    I will still say it is BS. There is plenty of research and experts to discredit your hypothesis. It does not work on a consistant basis know matter how well you think it really works for you!

    If you were honest, it probably happened on an isolated incident and you were lucky at best that it worked for you during that time. Otherwise, you are not human.

    The brains response to anger sends a "fight or flight" message to the body. This means that adrenaline is pumped into the blood stream.

    These are just some of the physical changes in response to anger that your body has to manage when you say that "anger" works on the court:

    1. Increased sweating
    2. Rapid Breathing
    3. Faster heart beat
    4. Tense Muscles

    These are the performance issues that you teeter totter on when you say anger is your motivation to perform better:

    1. It interferes with clear judgement and makes it difficult to take the time to make good decisions.

    2. Where you need good physical skills it gets in the way of fine motor control. Bigtime need for tennis player as the fine motor skills are what stabilizes the racquet and stroke.

    3. It can seriously reduce your enjoyment of your play which will promote relaxation and focus.

    4. It damages the positive frame of mind you need for high quality output by:

    a. Narrowing attention

    b. Damaging self-confidence (I cant perform unless something makes me mad)

    c. Promoting negative thinking,

    d. Disrupting focus and concentration and making it difficult to cope with distractions.

    e. It consumes mental energy in distraction, anxiety, frustration and temper. This is energy that should be devoted to the work in hand.

    When someone tells me that it takes anger to get them focused or that anger works, they have a concentration problem. Case in point, Roger Federer. Well known for his anger and fits on the court when something didnt go his way during his early years. Until he got that in control he was waddling around the pro ranks. Once he determined to use postive focus and suside his anger, the rest is history.

    Clearly, positive intensity outperforms negative intensity by far and is what a tennis player needs.
     
  21. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2004
    Messages:
    4,071
    Stop play until the ball is retrieved. This business of whacking or kicking the ball over the fence is bush-league and should not be encouranaged by anyone.
     
  22. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    I will tell you why, because I know for a fact that anger is an islolated thing and not a common response to increase performance. I will also say it is a "lucky" thing that it actually worked in this isloated event. That is why it is BS.

    People throw stuff up on these boards because it worked one time or a couple times. They forget how often it didnt work. so if someone is going to disagree, opinion or no opinion, know what you're talking about or prepare for a debate.

    Everyone does have a right to their opinion and can post. I also have a right to my opinion and can post. I think it is BS.
     
  23. GrahamIsSuper

    GrahamIsSuper Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    Messages:
    504
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    I also think it's BS. I've played well over 300 matches in and out of tournaments over 12 years, and have rarely, if ever, see a player who plays with anger make it to quarters. That is, unless there were 8 people in the draw. It DOES NOT work consistantly. There is NO arguing that fact. Your self confidence goes down the tube if you think you cant win unless your opponent pisses you off.

    Hey, since this topic is starting to **** me off, maybe I'll go play a set right now and see how well anger works. I'll let you know the results.
     
  24. speedofpain88

    speedofpain88 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    357
    I think a lot of what you've said is BS too. So I'm not human because I can use my anger to my advantage. Just because it doesn't work for you or for most people doesn't mean it doesn't work. Plenty of other people (kevhen mostly recently) have given examples of how it has worked for them.

    I said I disagreed because of my personal experience and because the people before me had only talked about the negative aspects of it. Still, I didn't tell them that what they said was BS and I didn't say things like "you must not be human." I know perfectly well about the nervous system and the fight or flight response caused by the sympathetic nervous system. I also know what brain structures are involved and I know what the biological effects of it are, so you don't need to explain it to me. In the end, after everything you've said, it still doesn't make you right. There will always be people that aren't blinded by their anger and can make good use of it. What you call a concentration problem is a problem for some and not for others.

    Anger is used properly (giving an advantage and raising athletes levels) in so many sports. I didn't see any of your evidence showing it is bad in basketball or other sports.
     
  25. GrahamIsSuper

    GrahamIsSuper Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    Messages:
    504
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    Oh, WOOPS! You know, I was so blindly angered, I couldn't find the steps, fell down them and died. End of my tennis career. Thanks a lot all of you who said anger worked. :evil:
     
  26. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    Well good, then you would know that your anger burst is not a sustained energy booster. You would know that your anger success was isolated and is not for sustained match play. You would know that introducing anger constricts the blood vains and reduces oxygen which causes you to breathe harder.

    You would also know that your islolated disagreement is not the full truth of how anger works. Why dont you tell us how many times it didnt work during yoru match play?

    It is a negative thing - anger. It has more negative aspects then positive. It is not a performance enhancer for the tennis player. If it is, it is only for short bursts of energy that can easily backfire on a player. You may think it works for you or is in your best interest - I say it doesn't and isn't.

    And please dont soften your message. Towards the bottom of your recent message you started to take a slight shift from anger towards intensity and determination. This is different then anger. You can be intense and determined, yet relaxed and positive. But that takes practice.

    My argument is focused on anger and the posters question. "Is using built up anger in a positive way a good way of playing or is it risky?"

    My argument is about how anger does not work and should not be something a player seeks to develop. When a player is confronted with a frustrating situation, it is better for them to relax and focus on the game plan then it is to get angry and "think" they are doing themselves a favor. It is not a smart move to falsely think that anger is a key to their success.

    The bottom-line is this player wasn't focusing. In this case, getting angry helped him focus, but the solution is not getting angry to play better. Otherwise, this will be difficult to achieve on a consistant basis. It is also training him to respond with intensity when he is in a "fight" situation. What if the player is really better than him and crushes him when he is angry? What then? Is this a good training system? Would you teach your players that anger is good and should be practiced so you can get angry in a match to get motivated? WRONG.

    It is better for a player to train themselves to calm down than get angry. It is better to train a player to increase intensity and focus while their heart rate is controlled and they are receiving as much oxygen in the blood stream to send to the muscles to perform. It is better to train a player to hit their shots with confidence, to take deep breathes and exhale and develop smooth efficient strokes then it is to teach them that "anger works".

    Again, if any of us has to get angry to play better - we have a concentration problem and are in denial.
     
  27. Tim Tiger Henman

    Tim Tiger Henman Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2004
    Messages:
    265
    Guys aren't we fogetting something? The debate was about using anger in tennis, which is an interesting question and needs to be looked at. Anger on a message board is definitely a no-no.

    Going back to Mac, he himself posed the question of how much more he would have won if he didn't get angry on court. Yet look at him in the seniors - he still gets as mad as ever!!

    Only conclusion - its a mad, mad world!!!
     
  28. speedofpain88

    speedofpain88 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    357
    I didn't shift anything towards intesity and determination. Maybe you didn't read what I wrote carefully, but then I'm surprised you bothered reading it at all since you know so much.

    However, I did say that anger can raise intensity and determination. Please don't put words in my mouth. I never said that anyone should be taught that anger works. However, if it happens, which it most likely will it is best to know that it can be utilized as a weapon and it shouldn't mean that if you get angry that's the end.

    And as far as telling you when it didn't work - the fact remains that I don't get angry on purpose to win. It doesn't happen very often, but when it does I (in my game) haven't seen a negative impact on my game once. What you're talking about is blind rage, not controlled anger. There is a big difference. I never said my anger led me to start throwing things or swearing or screaming at myself. That's completely different.

    So, once more I don't have to get angry to play well, but when I have gotten angry, I have not been impacted negatively. There is no concentration problem, or denial.
     
  29. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    Well there we go. The truth is out.

    With that said, I would advise the poster to view "getting angry" to play better as a negative thing. Develop your game around focus and relaxation. This will help you stay centered and calm.

    If you do end up getting angry, realize that anger has a very small place and is to be controlled otherwise you risk very negative side effects. It can backfire on you and cause your emotions to "crash". Once you crash, you lost.

    Also, just because it worked "once" or a "couple of times" with "speedofpain88" it is not a smart move to rely on it to bail you out.

    I think "speedofpain88" just doesn't quite remember how often he got angry and it didn't work to his advantage.
     
  30. 16

    16 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    308
    I have gotten angry on the court and played well as i have played bad. I think the times that i played well was not because of me so much but because of the other guy, he could not handle the sudden increase in pace and became somewhat overwhelmed, or i started hitting out more which kept the ball in where before i may have been to tenative, or it made me more aggressive (changing my game) which may have changed the pace of the match.
    If you can truly control your anger on the court i think it should be called focus more than anger if that makes sense. I know for a fact that when i go on the court with a 100% focused attitude(roger federer attitude/pete sampras) I'am a much better player than when i'am angry. I can stay relaxed, sit back and watch the guy lose to himself(anger), i seem to have more control over my motor skills, and when playing a opponent that is on, i can easily change my game , where when i'am angry its not so easy for me to do so.

    My point; anger can help your game at times but true focus will help you win consistently.(plus your typically not having fun when angry.)(and i think you are less likely to injure yourself from overworking and putting too much stress on your body if you aren't angry)
     
  31. Power Game

    Power Game Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Messages:
    1,151
    Here's my take on anger and tennis.
    It is ok to get mad over some shots and get ready to explode, then you take a huge huge cut at the next ball (or you smash a racquet, kick something, yell, whatever), you either hit a winner or an error. Then you relax and are relieved that you got rid of all that negative energy and you go back to a smooth focused game. If you are playing each point with anger you'll just get madder and madder and you probably won't win.
     
  32. speedofpain88

    speedofpain88 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    357
    Still, the point of what I originally said was not "get angry and then you'll win," it was "if you get angry, it is possible to use it to your advantage if it is controlled anger."
     
  33. GrahamIsSuper

    GrahamIsSuper Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    Messages:
    504
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    Speedofpain, sounds like the only time you used "anger" you were actually using a little thing called "aggression". There's a difference between the two. When I get Angry, I smash a racket, throw hats, and lose matches, not to mention Im out $130 bucks on a new racket. If I play aggressively, that's another story. You just have to know when to play aggressively and when to bide your time. Truth is, Anger's very negative and costly, and it REALLY sucks trying to get manuf. to replace your rackets.
     
  34. sarpmas

    sarpmas Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    229
    Interesting debate! The original post was 'Using anger to motivate'. I think some interpreted this as 'playing with anger', and this is very different from the original question. When you are playing with anger, you are not 'using anger to motivate', instead, you are more likely to lose focus and get frustrated during the match, especially when your play continued to get worst. However, when you are 'using anger to motivate', you are translating your anger to positive thinking (or energy?), you are not 'playing with anger' anymore, you are playing with increased intensity and controlled aggression.

    My personal experience was I played best when I'm relaxed. I'm like playing in a 'matrix zone'! Everything looked slow and I seemed to have all the time in the world to position myself and prepare for all my shots. On the contrary, if I'm playing with anger, I'll lose my concentration, lose my footwork and worst of all, beat myself.
     
  35. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    Not to beat this dead horse in the ground, but the original poster asked if it was risky to use anger to motivate. There are going to be those occasions where a GOOD KICK IN THE PANTS will get you going.

    But I say it is risky. You shouldnt loook to anger all the time to bail you out of a motivation problem. It is not a good way to play and approach the game as it can certainly backfire on you and instead of being steady trying find the key to unlock your opponents game you run the risk of deflating if you dont strike right away.

    So since you chimed in, using anger at any moment is risky - period. A players should practice using concentration in a positive way. Anger is not positive. It has too many negative side effects to make a "smart" play.

    For those that it did work for, they fail to mention all the times it didnt!
     
  36. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2004
    Messages:
    4,405
    Location:
    Auckland, New Zealand
    It is risky to play too long with anger as the main focus. I have seen people try to hold the anger within and watch their games get worse while they tried to hold back that emotion. I have seen others blow up with anger and play really bad afterwards, but some people need a release and may start playing better after a short emotional burst. I think we all have Johnny Mac as a good example of how someone can use anger to turn a match around since sometimes this would affect his opponents games and get them out of their rhythm . Personally I try to avoid getting angry and try to stay as calm as possible so I can think straight and hit in a relaxed mode. I do know from experience in other sports where a little anger helped me to play harder and more aggressive but sometimes I will lose focus on the game as I focused on the opponent who had made me angry and directed my energy toward that person in a one on one battle which may or may not always be the best thing for the team. This is not a BS debate.
     
  37. Power Game

    Power Game Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Messages:
    1,151
    Did you guys just see Federer take Thomas Johanson out from a set down. He even threw his racquet down and kicked it. He was angry and used the anger to motivate himself and step up his game. Note that he did not play with anger.
     

Share This Page