Using no machine to string a racket

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by bruno hau, May 22, 2009.

  1. bruno hau

    bruno hau Rookie

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    Has anyone ever try to string a racket without a stringing machine and only use gym weights? This might be a two person job with one person tensioning by lifting the racket & weights off the ground and the other person clamping the strings with flying clamps. Sounds very doable to me. But I wonder if the racket is able to handle the stress of lifting with both hands, either from top or from bottom.
     
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  2. kopfan

    kopfan Rookie

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    You can be the first one.. kudos to you!
     
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  3. eeytennis

    eeytennis Semi-Pro

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    I have never heard of that being done. Even if it has been done before I would be willing to bet that the tension was WAY off. How would you keep the racket still when stringing it?
     
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  4. aussie

    aussie Professional

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    I've got a tennis playing friend who is a very, very good player and he strings his own racquets by hand. He tells me he uses a door handle to apply tension and his jobs look pretty messy (large tie off knots etc) but his racquets in his hands at least play well. Don't really know how he does it and even though I offer to string for the cost of the string, he's content to do it himself. So no, you don't need a machine to string unless you call a door a machine!!
     
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  5. Nuke

    Nuke Hall of Fame

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    I would think the chances of seriously damaging the racquet would be great. A stringing machine doesn't only pull tension -- the mounting system keeps the frame from collapsing. When you string the mains, and there are no crosses installed yet to counterbalance it, the tension on all those mains wants to pull the racquet shorter, and it's only the machine's mounting system that prevents damage.
     
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  6. tenmirage

    tenmirage New User

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    i saw a guy in a tennis shop in the philippines stringing racquets by hand about 5 months ago.too bad i did not take pictures.

    so i think its not so uncommon.
     
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  7. acehole

    acehole Banned

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    people do this kind of stuff all the time. but like others said i would worry about the frame, unless you brace it.
     
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  8. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    I think you can do it if it is in 30-40 lbs range. You could do everything by hand in this case. I know pros that play with 40lbs tension so it can be done.
     
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  9. radigan

    radigan Rookie

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    A little while back, someone posted an old article from Popular Mechanics or some similar magazine that gave instructions on how to do it. I remember they used a handheld cam device to pull tension against the frame and used awls to jam into the grommet to hold the tension after pulling. (this was on wooden frames by the way)
     
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  10. Nuke

    Nuke Hall of Fame

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  11. MAX PLY

    MAX PLY Hall of Fame

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    ^ seems safer than the method posed by the OP. However, if the OP tries his original posed method, please video and share with us or have your estate do so.:)
     
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  12. dancraig

    dancraig Hall of Fame

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    I have a copy of the USRSA's newsletter "The Stringer's Assistant" from May, 1979. It has full instructions on how to string a racquet by hand. It also contains information about how to splice in a repair section of string.
     
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  13. KOPT

    KOPT Rookie

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    could you scan it and post here?

     
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  14. dancraig

    dancraig Hall of Fame

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    __________
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2009
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  15. dancraig

    dancraig Hall of Fame

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    __________
     
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  16. kairosntx

    kairosntx Professional

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    When I lived in Egypt in the early 80's I had my racquets strung by a local tennis pro who used a long piece of wood that was octaganal wrapped with cloth in the middle (4-5 inches). The string would be wrapped around the wood and he would twist the piece of wood to create the tension. I can't remember what he used to hold the tension when pulling the string through but the tension held up nicely and I was happy with the tension of the string jobs I got from him. I'd say it was around 50lbs.
     
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  17. dancraig

    dancraig Hall of Fame

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    I'm having a problem getting it to post correctly. Give me an email and I will send it to you.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2009
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  18. origmarm

    origmarm Hall of Fame

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    Thanks for posting that article Nuke, I was going to say I remember my grandfather saying he used to string racquets with two awls and a lever. I don't believe this would work on a graphite racquet though, I think it would crack the frame.
     
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  19. Nuke

    Nuke Hall of Fame

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    ^^ Yeah, if you strung a modern, flexible racquet like that, you'd be stringing all the mains with no mounting mechanism to counteract all the tension. I think a lot of racquets would collapse before you got the first cross string on.
     
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  20. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    Agreed! :)
     
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  21. origmarm

    origmarm Hall of Fame

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    Having read through the little article I do however believe that my grandfather bought as opposed to made his set of implements.
     
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  22. dancraig

    dancraig Hall of Fame

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    __________
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2009
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  23. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    sure looks like the center two mains are crossed in that retro photo ;)
     
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  24. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    Great eyes... they do appear to be crossed.
     
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  25. KOPT

    KOPT Rookie

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    glebmaslov@yahoo.com

     
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  26. dancraig

    dancraig Hall of Fame

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    KOPT
    Check your email.
     
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  27. origmarm

    origmarm Hall of Fame

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    Is that actually an illegal pattern or not thinking about it? I don't think so...No idea why you would want to do it but probably ok.
     
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  28. johnqadams

    johnqadams New User

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    Hey, if you can carve that "tension puller" out, why not a wooden mounting system, too? These are definitely old school methods, though. Why not just buy a cheap table top? Unless you are just nostalgic (or very self-sufficient!). :)
     
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