USTA Development system is not the only one struggling to produce

Discussion in 'Junior League & Tournament Talk' started by Gonzalito17, Apr 13, 2012.

  1. Gonzalito17

    Gonzalito17 Hall of Fame

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    Okay, the US is not producing Slam winners lately, but which nation is? Spain doesn't have any new "Can't Miss" youngsters since Nadal who look like future major champions (Pablo Andujar is about 25). Neither does France, Russia, England, Argentina, Australia, Germany, Croatia, Serbia. The new wave of young players - Tomic, Dimotrov, Harrison, Raonic, Dolgopolov - have all had very gradual ascents up the rankings and have a long way to go to become major champs. Tennis is SO COMPETITIVE now it's just very hard right now to produce miracle players like Pete Sampras, Agassi, Federer, Nadal, Djokovic. Yes there are flaws in the USTA system, as have been pointed out in other threads (Wayne Bryan's letter), but surely there are flaws with the development programs in the other tennis nation powerhouses as well. By the looks of things, Spain could be entering a lull right now, post Nadal, that the US is currently in.

    It seems the USTA is getting clobbered for their system but there is not one system now that is consistently churning out sure fire world beaters like Nadal. Your comments please...
     
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  2. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    It is lucky that our generation saw 4 GOATs in succession: Sampras, Federer, Nadal and Djokovic, each better than the previous one. It may never happen again.
     
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  3. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

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    IMO, "systems" and/or "programs" don't/can't "produce" greatness. They can churn out lots of good players, but all-time great players like those mentioned above don't come from systems, programs, or federations.

    I don't think it should be the goal of a system, program, or federation to "produce" players, but support the sport and offer support to those on their way to greatness.
     
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  4. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    You need to support a lot of B level players, grow the sport, allow industry to make money on equipment, and popularize the game. That increases the chances of an A level player emerging. It pretty much works like that for most things. An academic or business genius cannot be "produced," but it is wrong to think that he/she will emerge without an infrastructure. Sure, that can happen too once in a while, but to increase the chances, the infrastructure must be there. China is an example of a country which produces a large number of B people, in many different walks of life, and slowly A level people like Li Na started emerging. The US has traditionally been dependent on A level pioneers of the rugged masculine kind, but that approach cannot continue when there is a huge difference in the sizes of the available pools, and information percolation is very fast in the modern age. It is becoming a major challenge in many fields now, tennis is the least of them actually.
     
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  5. Tennishacker

    Tennishacker Professional

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    Yes, just grow the game and give financial support to those on the track to greatness.
     
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  6. Korso

    Korso Semi-Pro

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    The cost for high quality tennis academies with inflation hurting the population has created a smaller pool of talent to select from. There are not many risk takers in this economy. Lower costs and market to everyone and you will see more talent come along.
     
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  7. Rina

    Rina Rookie

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    Tomic and Raonic are both of a similar cultural and ethnic background, former Yugolsavia, and their families speak the same language. Djokovic used to hit with Tomic and had a comment "we speak the same language." Roanic was born in Montenegro and moved to Canada. Am I being paranoid or is there something genetic going on there, height, stuborness? Both kids I would guess didn't necessarily have a ton of money with immigrant parents trying to make it in a new country. Or are parents from there all like Djokic's Dad?
     
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  8. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Genetics is the most important factor. Other than Djokovic and Raonic in the height category, we have Karlovic. John Isner is holding his own, beating Tsonga on clay. Sharapova = height. Sometimes people with the right genetics will also pick up the sport in which they have the talent, and the result will be good.
     
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  9. CoachDad

    CoachDad Rookie

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    I went through the top 30 men and most are 5'10-6'2". Not exactly freaks.

    The women are a different story, more of the top players are much taller than average.
     
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  10. Gonzalito17

    Gonzalito17 Hall of Fame

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    That's what we all thought when Sampras was on top but then along came Federer out of nowhere, and then Rafa and Djok.

    That's the beauty of tennis, you never know which young player is suddenly going to pop big like Federer did in that Swiss vs. USA Davis Cup tie. Tomic Dimitrov Harrison and Raonic could all POP BIG soon. You never know.
     
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  11. Gonzalito17

    Gonzalito17 Hall of Fame

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    Well said. Pressure crushes too many kids, gotta keep it fun too.
     
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  12. Gonzalito17

    Gonzalito17 Hall of Fame

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    Well said Sureshs
     
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