Völkl C10 Pro Club!

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by Shasha, Jul 23, 2011.

  1. KaiserW

    KaiserW Semi-Pro

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    How is serving with this racquet?
     
  2. skydog

    skydog New User

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    I am hoping for that to happen again, I would like to get a third at that price now that I have had time to play with the racquet a couple of weeks and have decided to move it to the top of the rotation.
     
  3. ultradr

    ultradr Hall of Fame

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    My sentiment exactly so far (although I demoed about 10 hour only).

    Powerful sometimes, powerless sometimes. Flexible but firm some times.
    Very interesting and would like to get to know more about C10 pro.
     
  4. Brian72

    Brian72 Rookie

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    I just played a match yesterday for the first time with the c10 pro. Having played with a Pure Drive and the Becker Melbourne recently, the more head light nature of the C10 made for a great serving stick. Pace was way up and spin was excellent. The best serving stick I've used in two years. I played with the PB10 Mid for a couple of years and really enjoy it on serve, for the same reason. Plenty of mass behind the ball, and ease in getting the racquet head moving.

    I'm still trying to dial in the timing on my ground strokes. Especially on the back hand side. I'm just a little ahead of my self. I'm excited to continue playing with this stick.
     
  5. Guildenstern

    Guildenstern New User

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    I'm two months into switching to the C10 Pro and can report complete satisfaction. It's got everything I was looking for: elbow friendly, great control, soft feel, but also powerful and spin-friendly.

    I was coming from the Head YouTek IG Prestige MP -- great racquet, but I wanted a 16x19 pattern and a bit more power (but better balance/feel than the Prestige Pro). Basically, I wanted a modern player's racquet that's easy on the elbow, great at net, heavy but swings fast, and still has enough free power to help me out when my technique falls apart (on the run, out of position, etc).

    But I figured I was being too picky. I tried out a lot of racquets, none were right. I figured I'd have to compromise. Then tried the C10 Pro. Glad I did!

    Wonderful server... Very good for volleys... All groundstrokes solid, the head just whips through the air during rallies... Spin is good, slices are good... So much feel for touch shots.... It's really a total extension of my arm, as they say, though this is the first time I've been able to say that since I gave up my Yonex RDiS 100 Mids (for elbow problems) a couple years ago.

    Chris Edwards mentioned in his review that he likes to use it for testing strings, because it's so adaptive to different setups. I've found this to be very true. Not that the racquet plays poorly with certain strings, but somehow it allows you to feel a string's properties more than other sticks.

    Right now playing mostly with Head RIP Control 16 in the upper fifties, as recommended here. Loving it. Totally comfy on the elbow, but still dampens the racquet and string bed's power so I can swing out completely.

    I also loved NRG2, but I tend to break multis pretty quickly and need a bit more durability.

    For what it's worth, I'm a 4.0 all-court player, doing a lot of serve and volley. I got Paul Reed at TW to tweak the specs for me a bit -- added a leather grip and some weight so my racquets are approx 355g, 8HL, 336SW (strung).

    If anyone has elbow problems, but still wants that modern feel (with a heavy racquet), give the Völkl C10 Pro a try! It's a beauty!
     
  6. boinz

    boinz Rookie

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    can someone help me with the different C10 pro paintjobs since the very first to the current one? I know this information had been posted before but I just cant find it anywhere now
     
  7. ultradr

    ultradr Hall of Fame

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    Thanks for the review. I'm on a same boast as you, trying to find a replacement for my old Head FXP Prestige MP, preferably tad more
    powerful and forgiving.

    I'm surprised you needed to dampen its power coming from Prestige MP...
     
  8. mrmike

    mrmike Rookie

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    I also went from the Prestige MP to the C10 pro and the C10 is definitely more powerful. Certain multis such as NRG2 and x1 were uncontrollable for me, especially in the warmer weather. Also tried multiple polys and poly hybrids but my arm just doesn't like it. The RIP provides comfort with a muted low power response which really helps control. I prefer the 17G but for some reason it's been difficult to get for a while now. Just bought a few sets of 16G to hold me over for now.
     
  9. Guildenstern

    Guildenstern New User

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    Yup, though it may be that I'm just not used to it yet. The open pattern, the big sweetspot, the way the racquet really cradles the ball, plus a high-quality multi... that's a lot of power, at least for me.

    There's a lot to love with NRG2 in there, particularly the feel around the net. But I found myself spraying balls in match play, whereas with the RIP 16 I'm more comfortable at different speeds -- rally balls, defensive shots, ripping it.

    The fun (and relieving) part is knowing I've found the right frame for my game. Now I can take a while to tinker with strings.
     
  10. Guildenstern

    Guildenstern New User

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    How was the life expectancy with the 17? Also, noticeably more powerful than the 16?

    I keep being pleasantly surprised by the 16 in terms of feel and spin production (great for both my kick and flat serves), but it definitely feels "thick," and it's taking more work than expected to dial in my one-handed backhand.
     
  11. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    I've loved the combo of soft and crisp that I get with 17 ga. synthetic gut in my C10's, but I also have to use high enough tension so that the control doesn't slip too much. I'll drop tension in the colder weather, but I like mine up around 61 or 62 lbs. in the warmer summer conditions. While I'm not much of a fan of Prince SG w/Duraflex, the 17 ga. version of that string seems to run well in these frames for me and the Duraflex probably helps with the service life, too.

    As for power, I'd classify my C10's somewhere in between earth-shaker and skull-crusher. While they may not deliver the sort of explosive response at contact (we sometimes call it "pop") that might be more typical of something like a Pure Drive Roddick, my C10's let me hit harder with a lot more control. I also have some O10 325g's that I've customized with some lead tape, but they still don't stand up to the ball quite like my C10's.

    Some of that significant power I enjoy with my C10's certainly comes from the heft and stability that's built into them, but I like to go to the net a lot and I crave the feel of easy maneuvering. All my C10's have lead tape on their handles for more head-light balance, but I've never felt the need to add any heft to their hoops. For anyone who wants quicker handling with their Volkls (or anything else), I think this tuning is worth a try. It's simple and easy enough to undo if it doesn't work out.

    I've worked out for a few summers with a young gun who is building a very strong game - probably headed for a half-decent college team after he finishes high school - and he was really pushing me around at the start of this past summer. I'd been using my O10's for about a year to that point and my game wasn't especially rusty, but when I switched into my old C10's, the difference was substantial for me. Suddenly I could push him around.

    It's not all about the racquet, but the right one sure helps the cause. I've also had great luck with the C10 in terms of arm comfort. Even when I get into a long stretch of teaching and playing every day for a few weeks, my arm doesn't object one bit when I'm swinging the C10. I don't use poly because I don't worry about getting extra control and I don't want to put my older joints at risk, but a snug setup of syn. gut in these racquets has been more than acceptable for me.

    I just got a couple of 2nd hand Six.One 95's for some noodling around and the first thing I noticed was that these Wilsons are a little more lean than both my C10's and customized O10's (and a good deal less hefty than my O-L-D 6.1 Classics). A snug bed of 17 ga. syn. gut is feeling right in these, but we'll see what happens when I go for some real high speed shredding.
     
  12. mrmike

    mrmike Rookie

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    I had no problem with string life using the 17G, but I have never been a string breaker. Was re-stringing maybe every 2-3 months if I stuck with the same frame all the time. Today was my first try with the 16G. I dropped the tension 2 lbs. from 60 to 58 to compensate for the gauge difference. It played very well and I didn't notice any drop in power from the 17G. Maybe slightly less spin potential but the 16G still played very similar and I was pleasantly surprised.
     
  13. ultradr

    ultradr Hall of Fame

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    I tend to hit balls with slightly upper hoop locations of a frame.
    The small area slightly above center of the hoop. I don't know why
    but I like the firmness there compared to springy lower sweet spot.
    That's where string bed wears out and eventually pops.

    I keep hearing C10's upper-hoop deadness and wonder how this would work out
    with my hitting style and preference on upper sweet spot. Any C10 users
    considered it?
     
  14. Gee

    Gee Professional

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    Actually I don't experience the tip-dead hoop of my C10 (2010 version). I read on this forrum that the versions from 2008 have a stiffer hoop than the older ones.
    Maybe this causes confusion about this.

    Try with some lead into the tip from 10-2 if you tend to hit high into the frame.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2014
  15. ultradr

    ultradr Hall of Fame

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    Thanks Gee.


    Switching from FXP Prestige MP to either C10 Pro or VCore Tour series.......
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2014
  16. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    The "tip-dead" aspect of the C10 is, at least in my opinion, only a mild personality quirk and not any serious issue affecting the racquet's performance.

    The first C10's I picked up were rather old ones from both the "fishscale" and regular yellow & black generations - probably several years old with plenty of mileage on them. I'm not sure whether all racquets lose their resilience and tend to become more generally dead over their service life, but if so, these older C10's may have been more tip-dead than some fresher ones. My newest one is from the black with yellow lettering generation (maybe '08?) and it delivers a wonderful blend of soft and snappy feel, plus it's a bit more lean than a couple of my older models.

    A pal of mine who was a Volkl fan at the time that I got those first ones told me about the potential for that tip-dead behavior. Coming from my stiff and hefty old ProStaff 6.1 Classics, the C10's were definitely softer rides overall and didn't quite have the same inherent "pop" as my 6.1 Classics, but the C10's gave me a BIG boost in control with my strokes.

    Because the racquet has a more mellow response overall, there's probably also a diminished degree of response with contact that's too close to the top of the string bed, but it's no sort of liability or drawback for me. I'm convinced that any softness through the hoop of this frame effectively magnifies this racquet's arm-friendliness for me. I've found no other frame that delivers the combo of performance and comfort I get with this racquet and there will probably always be a place reserved in my bag for at least one of them (I'm actually shopping a new pair of these right now).

    One note: While the C10 is a somewhat hefty frame, I love mine with a couple tenths of an ounce worth of lead tape applied under their grips. The extra head-light balance gives me better handling and overall behavior without making the already solid racquet sluggish or cumbersome.
     
  17. ultradr

    ultradr Hall of Fame

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    Thanks fuzz_nation for all your feedbacks in this thread and others.
     
  18. mrravioli

    mrravioli Rookie

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    the alu rough in my c10 is losing tension and the stringbed is becoming too powerful and uncontrollable like a trampoline. i don't break strings very often and could generate most of my spin and power. anyone of you could recommend a string that holds tension better while does not harm the great feel of the racquet? THX
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2014
  19. Gee

    Gee Professional

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    Lately I switched from Head RIP Control 17 to MSV Focus Hex 19. I am really impressed on this string. There are also remarkable many comments on the feedback section. So it seems a very popular string and that's why I would recommend you to try this one.
     
  20. GrandSlam45

    GrandSlam45 Rookie

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    I've found that good gut/poly hybrid works great with the C10.
     
  21. ultradr

    ultradr Hall of Fame

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    I just got new c10 pro (current model).

    Where is the grip size label? I do not see grip size anywhere on the frame? ?

    Thanks.
     
  22. Tony II

    Tony II New User

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    Look at the inner side of the throat … there must be an transparent sticker … located close to the model data ..
    Hope that helps !
     
  23. ultradr

    ultradr Hall of Fame

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    Thanks ! I think it's been scraped off while stringing. There is a product number on the plastic wrap over the handle. That number ends with ".3". Would this indicate size 3 ?
     
  24. Tony II

    Tony II New User

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    http://postimg.org/image/bha4cdm43/

    Sorry for this poor picture - the plastic wrap over the handle, ... 4 3/8 L3 ... indicates the handle size. About the product number "V12403.3", and the last 3... i just can say "most probably" :(
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2014
  25. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    I use a C-9 weighted to 349 g.

    I think the best string setup I've had was Volkl Power Fibre at about 57 lbs. tension. Generally I use a soft synthetic.
     
  26. ultradr

    ultradr Hall of Fame

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    Thanks! I have same product number although the product tag on the handle
    on my c10 pro does not have large volkl prints like yours. Just UPC code and
    product # on a plain white piece of paper. I think I'll take it as size 3.

    I'm now ready to hit the court with my 1st C10 pro with natural gut at 62 lbs !
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2014
  27. graycrait

    graycrait Rookie

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    2 months shy of 60. Got a couple of 2012 C10 Pros last April. Wanted to try out a "players racket" that wouldn't kill my arm. I've been an on and off again hack since elementary school, but the last 6 or 7 years been playing 3-5 times a week. Started taking lessons summer of '13. I put the C10s up because I couldn't seem to get them around fast enough and the co-poly and multis seemed to bother my arm/wrist. So have been playing with Wilson BLX 6.1 Teams 16x18 leaded to 11.2 oz 4pts HL. I started stringing my own rackets in July. Tonight was the second night of a 4/4.5 league I joined thinking "if not now, when." I was getting pushed back using my Wilsons. I went over to my bag and took out a C10 I had cut out some multis that morning and strung up some Gosen OG Sheep Micro 17 at 62lbs in the mains with Gosen Proform 15L in the crosses at 59lbs. I am the oldest player in this league by some years and in the group I was playing with tonight I was the oldest by at least 15 years. Whether or not it was mental or physical I am not sure, but I was killing returns and forehand drives, along with solid low backhand slices with the C10 and syn guts that I was not with the Wilson. Problem is that I seem to to have issues with the C10 when playing with crafty no pace old guys like me, but when hitting against pace the C10 seems to serve me better. Probably just need more lessons and less equipment changes.
     
  28. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    I've been thinking about this issue a lot in the wake of my experiences on the courts since last spring. In short, I think you'd be smart to hold onto both of your racquets - the Volkl and the Wilson - depending on the setting.

    I use both the C10 and Volkl's Organix 10 325g (customized, but still less hefty than my C10's). The C10's won me over as soon as I found that extra control around the baseline in a soft and stable package, but the O10's are also a LOT of fun - semi-soft, plenty of spin on demand, lots of control. I'm really cozy with the O10's for moderate paced hitting, feeding for coaching/teaching, and even enjoy them for doubles because of their combo of snappy response and slightly quicker handling.

    Teaching on clay courts at a club this summer also called for the more mellow O10 where I was feeding a lot, but also hitting lots of slower balls that are inherent on that surface. Then I got my confidence rattled when I got out on a hard court with a hitting pal headed for his senior year of high school and probably on to a half-decent college team after that. In our first summer workout, he was making me feel kind of helpless - I couldn't handle his stronger game playing with my O10's.

    When I swapped into my C10's, the difference was significant. I could fight off his heavier stuff and when I wasn't completely defensive, I could push him around. I know that a little of the on-court confidence is in my head, but I'm convinced that I got a better "fit" from my C10's for that harder hitting. If you keep both racquets handy in your bag, you might also find better service with one or the other depending on how strong the other players hit it.

    A consideration with your C10: If you often feel as though this racquet is a little slower or more cumbersome than you'd like, you might benefit from a little simple customization. I've added 1/2" lead tape to the handles of all of my C10's to get their balances up around 11 pts. head-light and I really love the difference this gives me in terms of their maneuvering. If you haven't tried this, it will only cost you a three dollar pack of lead tape along with a new grip if you put the tape underneath it (I've also done fine putting it on top of my replacement grip and then covering that with my overgrip).
     
  29. Guildenstern

    Guildenstern New User

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    I ran into something similar yesterday afternoon. Played a friend who's a solid 4.5 (I'm a 4.0+, lots of serve/volley), and we were playing a close match. He took the first set 6-4, but it was close the whole way. I was feeling confident. Second set, he removed all pace. Serves, groundstrokes, nothing had gas but nearly every ball was very well placed. It took me a couple games to adjust, and by that point he'd taken the set 6-3. He explained afterward that it was a deliberate ploy. He knew I play well with pace, but struggle to shift gears. Against a 3.5 or 4.0 pusher, I'll clean the clock, but a 4.5 pusher, i.e. medium pace, no errors, all angles, lots of low slice, drop shots, lobs, I get flustered.

    But I don't think the problem has much to do with the C10s. They're not APDs or similar power machines, but I've seen them in the hands of solid 4.5's and 5.0's and those guys don't struggle to hit big pace, big spin, rock-solid control.

    One thing I've learned from switching to the C10s is that my game needs work. But I can't blame the stick. And there's also a large measure of satisfaction when I recognize a point where I've improved and I get to credit my hard work, and not just the racquet's technology :). In that case, my C10s are exactly what I like/want/need.
     
  30. mrravioli

    mrravioli Rookie

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    Agreed with all the comments above. The C10 Pro is a rare combination of feel, power and control, as long as you could handle the weight. I replaced the stock grip with a TW leather one. It's just above 360g strung now with an overgrip and very headlight. It could feel a bit sluggish compared to a midsize with similar weight but, once again, the C10 provides all the feel, power and control I want if I could wield it effectively (and with the right string setup of course).
     
  31. mrravioli

    mrravioli Rookie

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    The stringbed of C10 is very dense in the center, comparable to that of a 18*20 midplus and much denser than the Wilson mids' with 16*19. Maybe Volkl should consider cutting out some of the margin of C10 for, say, a 95in size. The racquet does feel a bit sluggish when serving with its size and weight. Do miss the accuracy and oomph when serving with a Prestige or Pro Staff (I know they are top-notch in this section), and a smaller racquet size might fix that I guess.

    Simply my wildest imagination of course and I don't really think Volkl would make any change to such a classic. I'll try the PB10 mid then. Hope that one would be a perfect combination of the quickness of a mid and the extraordinary Volkl feel.
     
  32. Gee

    Gee Professional

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    I used the PB10 Mid a few years ago for a while but finally I figured out that I didn't really like that one.
    I highly prefer the C10 Pro as it is much more forgiving than the PB10.
    I also can hit heavier slice/kick serves with the C10 because of the bigger headsize.

    Though one my C10 Pros weighs 372 grams (with lead from 10-2, a leather grip, overgrip, vibration dampener and strings) it is still maneuverable enough to me.

    I only must admit that I sometimes wonder if I would play better without the extra weight.

    Last week I received my third C10 Pro. I hoped that one would weigh 330 grams exactly but unfortunately it is 337 grams. I put a Volkl S pallets and a Head synthetic leather grip for the firm feel of leather on this in order to keep the original balance/weight (31,5cm 363 grams strung).

    Tomorrow I 'll try this one and compare it with my heavier C10s.
     
  33. Power Player

    Power Player G.O.A.T.

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    If you get a chance to demo, try the Super G 295 - I know it is much lighter than what you prefer, but coming from the Tec 315 and Ps95, this frame is really impressing me a lot.
     
  34. Gee

    Gee Professional

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    Funny you responds to my post. I just wanted to recommend you to demo the C10 Pro. The C10 Pro still has that silky soft classic old school feel and it is not as low powered like the TF315 Ltd.

    And yes,... the SG295 caught my attention as well. Maybe I'll demo this one once but at the moment I am very satisfied with the C10 Pro. That feel and touch are just great. I also serve better than with the Head IG Prestige MP that I used before.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2014
  35. Power Player

    Power Player G.O.A.T.

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    If I decide to go back to heavy frames, I will definitely try that frame.

    But going down in weight has given me the ability to play longer and use less energy. The 295 is very solid and hits bigger than my heavy frames, so I going to go down this route for a bit and see how it goes.
     
  36. mrravioli

    mrravioli Rookie

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    Thx, Gee. Good luck with your new C10.

    I have a similar setup to yours, TW leather grip and just 1g each at 3&9. C10 does feel maneuverable on groundstrokes and even at net but I feel like swinging a big hammer when serving with it. That's more about technique of course. Maybe I'm just accustomed to the super fast feel of a midsize. I put my C10 right above a Pro staff 90 and found that Volkl could well add 2 more mains and 2 more crosses in the margin of the hoop without adjusting other part of the stringbbed. Then why not just make the C10 a little smaller for a dense 95? (No profanity to the classic frame)

    My PB10 mid has just arrived and my pal has an IG Prestige MP (another of your former racquets). Hopefully I could compare them side by side this weekend.
     
  37. ultradr

    ultradr Hall of Fame

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    About 10 hours into my new C10 pro, feeling similar about serving with it.

    Wonder what changes we should make... I am also coming from Head Prestige MP...

    It a bit heavier and tip flexible than the prestige...
     
  38. graycrait

    graycrait Rookie

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    I have 3 C10 2012s. I enjoy hitting with this racket, but I am having some issues with serving with this compared to other rackets I own. However, I really like the C10 for everything but serving so am going to commit to living with that niggly self-perceived shortcoming - I will figure it out. 60 yr old who plays 8-12 hours per week. Still taking lessons too. Self stringer and just tried some Ashaaway Dynamite 16 Tough mains x Ashaway Monogut ZX Pro in the crosses. Thinking about a reel of each.
     
  39. ultradr

    ultradr Hall of Fame

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    Compared to my prestige mp, which is my perfect serving racquet, C10 pro is touch heavier and probably more importantly 1 point more head light.

    I always go stock form with any racquet and do not like lead tape frames.

    So I'm thinking I should be able to adjust swing for this.
    Or does this have anything to do with its tip-flexiness ?
     
  40. Guildenstern

    Guildenstern New User

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    I'm a couple months into switching from the IG Prestige MP to the C10, and I've been very pleased with the Volkl's serving capabilities. The Prestige was great for serving: accuracy, great slice, good kick. But with the C10, playing both stock and modified, after maybe a week or so's adjustment, I get all the same and more. Especially with the kick, probably to do with the more open string pattern.

    It did take an adjustment period, maybe about two weeks' worth of matches. But then I started to feel confident, and I'm very happy now that I'm on the other side. :)

    I haven't experienced the tip's deadness affecting it much. Then again, I haven't noticed it much at all -- I think it's an overhyped aspect. If anything, when I'm catching the ball closer to the top of the frame, I get even more spin, but that's probably because of the larger gaps in the strings.

    To echo some other posts, the racquet responds great to a 17-gauge string. Currently using a full bed of poly, Gosen Sidewinder. Going to try Head's RIP Control 17 next.
     
  41. Gee

    Gee Professional

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    I completely agree (especially the bold phrases above).

    You'll notice a significant softer feel with Head RIP Control 17 compared to a poly string. However it is a great string into the C10. It was my regular string for many years untill I recently switched to MSV Focus Hex 19.

    I don't understand why some people have difficulties with serving but I guess it is a technical problem. If you record your service and post them here then I might give you some technical tips to improve your service.
     
  42. jjs891

    jjs891 Semi-Pro

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    I'm no expert on c10 but maybe people who have problems serving with c10 may have the older versions which have much lower RA stiffness rating ?? I've used newer version and I thought it served really well with very good pop and I'm not a big server.
     
  43. Rubens

    Rubens Semi-Pro

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    I wouldn't say the C10 is lacking in the serve department. It will reward those who have a sound serving technique. It is more forgiving for all the other strokes, though.
     
  44. ultradr

    ultradr Hall of Fame

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    Thanks for feedback, especially from someone switching from prestige mp.

    I wouldn't say tip "deadness". But I clearly feel upper hoop bends. I hit with slightly upper hoop area.
    That's where my gut string frays and eventually pops.

    I think that is where main adjustment is needed.
    It bends more and thus creates different angle.

    Currently, c10 pro is instantly more forgiving in general compared to prestige.
    For groundies, I need to swing lower to make the ball land in since it seems to launch things higher than prestige.
    It's fantastic for volleys without adjusting at all...
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2014
  45. ultradr

    ultradr Hall of Fame

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    I wouldn't say c10 is lacking in serving. It's just not as good as the head prestige (mp, for me, at least not yet, only about 15 hours playing).
     
  46. Gee

    Gee Professional

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    Apr 24, 2006
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    Try some lead at 10-2 o'clock location if you tend to hit high into the frame. It'll help with your upper hoop issues as well.
     
  47. mrmike

    mrmike Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
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    I really like RIP control 17 in the C10, but it's been hard to find lately. I strung up some 16G in one of my frames and it wasn't bad but the 17 is better IMHO.
     
  48. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Keep in mind that the strings are moving faster out toward the tip, so it's reasonable to catch some extra rpm's out there. I'll bet that the softness through the hoop just makes the not-quite-dead-center contact toward the top of the string bed a little less harsh than other racquets with a little more backbone through the hoop. High contact on the string bed of any racquet is a little weak, but the C10 is probably also less jarring. Just my theory having used a few generations of this wonderful racquet for several years.

    I've also found a lot of success with these racquets when I string them up with 17 ga. synthetic gut instead of 16 gauge. Nice crisp feel and control, but it can take one or two trials to find a cozy tension depending on the string. When it's hotter in the middle of summer, I might need some extra tension or even get better control with the thicker stuff.
     
  49. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Absolutely agree that certain racquets provide a better "fit" for different serves, but I can't say exactly what helps or hurts different sorts of players. The demos usually help figuring that out better than anything else.

    I love serving with my C10's, but these racquets aren't the spin-happy gizmos that my Volkl O10's are to me. My O10's are slightly less hefty than my C10's (even after customizing with lead tape), so they're probably easier to whup across the ball, but I've consistently found a better top end in power with the C10. No biggie, just my personal fit.

    I've also enjoyed my C10's more through the years with lead added to their grips for more head-light balance. Sorry if I've mentioned this here already, but I really think the heft of this frame is a whole lot more manageable from everywhere on the court when it's tuned more head-light. I like mine up around 11 pts. HL.
     
  50. jjs891

    jjs891 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2008
    Messages:
    506
    How much lead did you add at the handle and what is the static weight after you added lead ?
     

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