[video] Wall hitting

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by psv255, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. psv255

    psv255 Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Messages:
    960
    Location:
    NY
    Lazy, uninspired, "no thinking involved," wall hitting.
    I was having trouble spacing my distance away from ball on the forehand.

    I appreciate both full-on bashing and constructive comments very much.

    Thanks

    http://youtu.be/QzqP71zyvWU
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2012
    #1
  2. ShoeShiner

    ShoeShiner Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2012
    Messages:
    165
    Your BH/FH are fine for me.

    You should know one thing when the ball bounces back from the wall and ground, its speed will drop down to 30-40% of the speed we hit.
    If we want to hit after 1 bounce, we should stand closer. (Most people try to hit too hard in order to keep 1 bounce, it will be over hitting when we hit with the same swing in real courts.)
    If we want to stand far as you doing in the vid, we should hit after 2 bounces.
    ☞ Do not just hit and hit, do the drills in sets with objectives.

    I always train with the pros. But I do not want to pay money much, so I find someone better than me and do matches play. After matches play, make up objectives to practise, and make up some drills.

    Some of my wall drills, try this(difficult but useful) :
    ① Run to left and hit, then run to right and hit, repeat 10-12 shots per set, try 8-10 sets. 1 bounce when stand close. 2 bounces when stand far.
    ② Run to front and hit after 1 bounces, then run to back and hit after 2 bounces, repeat 8-10 shots per set, try 6-8 sets.
    ✺ We can practise to predict the ball high and ball path after the ball impact the wall. ✺
     
    #2
  3. enishi1357

    enishi1357 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2009
    Messages:
    191
    just step further back. it will help your backhand and forehand trust me
     
    #3
  4. psv255

    psv255 Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Messages:
    960
    Location:
    NY
    I'll try doing these drills, thanks.
    But somehow I don't see any merit in trying to hit after two bounces...the ball will most likely be too low to hit. Perhaps this is just true for me; the surface is a mix of gravel and concrete, not exactly Rebound Ace...

    Are the strokes fine? really? :\
     
    #4
  5. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    4,721
    Location:
    Hotel CA
    Your stokes look pretty good, nice windup and follow thru. Maybe get your footwork lighter and quicker so that you can get back to more of the ready position between hits.

    The wall is good for your total tennis game ... use it to work on volleys, half-vollies, the grounds that your showing, nice to alternate and work on FH and BH sequences. Also work serves and overheads. OH work nicely once you learn to hit it on the ground near the wall to result in a popup lob that requires backpedal and OH.

    Don't be too concerned with one vs two bounces or the level on the wall where your hitting, i.e. net level. Just get your strokes gooved and let the court be where you work on angles and geometry.
     
    #5
  6. 2ManyAces

    2ManyAces Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2011
    Messages:
    271
    Location:
    FL
    right after you take the racquet back on FH, it drops and there's a little flick of the wrist. I'd advise you to take the flick away because all it's doing is helping you to be lazy. in a match it'll be hard to keep up.
     
    #6
  7. UCSF2012

    UCSF2012 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,923
    Backhand is good. Forehand looks like you're hitting a shade too far from your body. But that may or may not be the camera angle.
     
    #7
  8. psv255

    psv255 Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Messages:
    960
    Location:
    NY
    Yes! I feel like I'm stretching too far for a lot of shots, you're right. Any way I make myself hit a little closer?
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
    #8
  9. UCSF2012

    UCSF2012 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,923
    Re-train your conception of where the ball should be to your right. Drop feed forehands to the wall and learn how close you should be to the ball. This is the T-ball version of tennis.

    When I'm out of practice, I end up being too far from the ball on my backhand, causing me to hit on the upper 3-4 inches of the frame. I have to consciously stand closer until it registers in my brain.
     
    #9
  10. psv255

    psv255 Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Messages:
    960
    Location:
    NY
    I see what you mean; my stroke does look a bit too wristy. thanks!

    I agree, footwork needs work :)
    The wall's great for a lot of things, but only if you have a very specific purpose...
     
    #10
  11. pvaudio

    pvaudio Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2009
    Messages:
    7,543
    I honestly do not like wall-practice for two reasons. One, it does not inform you of how your ball went, but more importantly, it does not encourage good footwork. Having watched your video, I think you understand how to use the wall well and to your advantage. I would suggest posting another video against a live opponent because the ball coming off the wall has no spin on it and only as much pace (minus maybe 40%) as you put into it. The value of a live opponent cannot be understated :)
     
    #11
  12. psv255

    psv255 Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Messages:
    960
    Location:
    NY
    very true words, sir!
    My footwork is rather slow, and I don't handle good pace well.
    I hope to be playing over the weekend, so I'll hopefully get some match play in, or at the very least some live hitting.
    For now, I was interested in the most glaring technical weaknesses in my strokes, especially with my forehand.

    Thanks
     
    #12
  13. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    Messages:
    2,337
    you have a very loose arm which can be both good and bad. good cuz you can generate lots of pace with just arm swing but bad cuz there could be dis connection between arm and the rest of the body. you need to strengthen your shoulder rotator muscles so your arm is always well centered in the shoulder socket joint. find the thrower's ten exercise and do them. and try to contact the ball right near the max performance zone in the range of motion of the shoulder. you'll need to move your legs a lot more with purpose to place your body at the right spot and orientation to do this. this will help your consistency a lot and ability to handle faster pace.

    one more thing on FH prep your arm and racquet higher racquet more upright and use the wrist for more topspin. now it's mostly for pace. open the stance a little more and l like how your balance is not leaning backward too much. keep it on the middle and front.
     
    #13
  14. vil

    vil Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2012
    Messages:
    441
    I'd second that, yes I agree, the wall rushes you, it's not the same as partner. But if anything, it's a great footwork workout. Wall forces you to move if you want to try.

    OP I would stand a bit further , that's it. Nice fluent hitting.
     
    #14
  15. TomT

    TomT Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,954
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale, FL
    I enjoyed your video. I love tennis videos. :)

    I'm not qualified to comment on your strokes, but, yeah you do seem to be being a bit lazy on some. However, on the one's that you, apparently, are not being lazy on then I like your forehand and backhand technique.

    You look to be very athletic, which will compensate for some laziness. But laziness is the enemy of progress. You have, imho, lots of potential.
     
    #15
  16. TomT

    TomT Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,954
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale, FL
    This, imho, is it. If one is lazy with wall hitting, then it might well reinforce bad habits. However, if one is focused and not being lazy, then I do believe that it can be valuable practice.
     
    #16
  17. psv255

    psv255 Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Messages:
    960
    Location:
    NY
    Thank you Tom! I agree, my lazy footwork is more than suspect.

    Well noted!
     
    #17
  18. TomT

    TomT Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,954
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale, FL
    I'm just a low level player, but nonetheless a student of the game. I actually like your forehand stroke, as it seems fluid and technically sound. Just don't be lazy with your footwork. :)
     
    #18
  19. TomT

    TomT Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,954
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale, FL
    The upside is that that's something that can be easily remedied for someone with your athletic ability.

    EDIT: So, I'm looking forward to seeing some videos of you hitting where you're doing nonlazy (is that even a word?) stroke preparation and execution on every shot. :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
    #19
  20. pvaudio

    pvaudio Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2009
    Messages:
    7,543
    This is precisely my feeling. With the wall you also lose the critical, at the risk of being nerdy, but critical visual data that you need to alter your next ball. For example, if you hit the ball just above the white line, you assume BAM! that'd be a winner. However, you have little sense of perspective because you're not on a tennis court to see how far in or far back you are. So, if you hit that sizzling winner on the court and it turns out you'd be in no-mans land, that ball's going well long.
     
    #20
  21. TomT

    TomT Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,954
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale, FL
    Good points, imho.
     
    #21
  22. vil

    vil Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2012
    Messages:
    441
    I don't try to make big statements here but I think that wall is a great addition to your regular practice specially if you have no partner, as long as you are aware of its limitations. I understand what you mean pvaudio that you have no judgement of depth but you also see how high you are hitting and how far you are standing. That should give you pretty good idea where the ball would be going in court situation. Now, me personally I use wall mainly for 2 things: consistent & clean contact and footwork. I don't care that much about the rest. I never felt the wall would somehow affect my judgement on court. Your eye-brain-hand coordination will automatically adjust once you start hitting against humans. One thing I really find interesting is, if I have a wall practice hit before my partners (for doubles) arrive, then once I start playing with them, I feel like I have lot of time to set up for a shot and I'm hitting much better.
     
    #22
  23. TomT

    TomT Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,954
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale, FL
    And these are even better points, imho.

    Never really thought about the difference in prep time between wall and court hitting, but it does make sense that a bit of prior wall hitting might translate to a perception of having lots of prep time, and thus being more relaxed and fluid, when hitting on court.
     
    #23
  24. ShoeShiner

    ShoeShiner Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2012
    Messages:
    165
    Two bounces for practising with enough time to ready position and split step.

    We can know where the ball land to the ground even we are practising with the wall, geometry principle will help. But practising with the plain wall is not much value added. The wall with exact scale same as the real court is necessary.

    If we know the nature of how the ball flies and its path, we can predict before it lands to the ground. Projectile principle, dynamic mechanic principle will help us predict the path. When the ball reaches the highest point in the air(just before it drop), we will know suddenly where the ball lands(even it spins), after the ball bounced we will know suddenly how high/far of the ball(even it spins). Most of the shots are predictable if you know the principle enough how to predict the ball path(topspin, underspin, drive, flat are different ball paths but they have principles).
    We have to practise much much more for quick reaction. With some more experiences, when the ball reaches the highest point in the air, we will know suddenly where the exact position in court we should run to wait the ball.

    We can not be level up with just wall hitting drills, fitness training, or other training. Matches play with various players and also with the players better than us are necessary.
     
    #24
  25. sportsfan1

    sportsfan1 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,812
    You seem to be consistent. How high and wide is the wall you are hitting against?
     
    #25
  26. psv255

    psv255 Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Messages:
    960
    Location:
    NY
    I agree with everything you've said, except a wall with the same scale as a real court. If focusing on technique and footwork, they aree applicable regardless of the layout of your surroundings. Of course, there is little pace and spin coming back from the wall, and much more will come from an opponent, but putting the ball into the court is something to be done on a tennis court. I can see where hitting too close or too far from a wall may become problematic, but from my own experience, I would hit shots against the wall that would surely be out, but then go to the court right away and be relatively consistent.

    The wall is part of a handball court, about 25 feet wide and about the same in height. I'm standing about 30-35 ft from the wall.
     
    #26
  27. psv255

    psv255 Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Messages:
    960
    Location:
    NY
    I'll definitely start the Thrower's Ten and be sure to adjust my forehand. Thanks borami!
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2012
    #27

Share This Page