Vintage Stringing Machines.

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by Topspin101, Jan 16, 2013.

  1. Topspin101

    Topspin101 Rookie

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    What types of machines were used to string in the 60's and 70's and do they have a collectors value today?
     
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  2. Lakers4Life

    Lakers4Life Hall of Fame

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    I beleive the Serrano fits that bill, and maybe the TTSM.
     
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  3. dak95_00

    dak95_00 Professional

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    The Ektelon Model D would fit the bill from the 70s. Based upon prices I see old machines go for on Clist or Fleabay, I'd say there is no collector's value. I'm sure there are people out there still using theses machines but I'm not seeing bidding wars for them.
     
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  4. Lakers4Life

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    The Model D is the one with the screw down press at the throat and the bottom screw at the head? I would of thought 80's but not 70's.
     
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  5. dak95_00

    dak95_00 Professional

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    70s. I'm quite certain when I talked to the guy at tennis machines he said it had been used since the early 70s. The P200 and MP100 machines were from the early 80s according to the manuals I've read from Prince.
     
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  6. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    70's easily. Mid-late eighties I was using a Model H, i believe?

    Anyhow, mid 80's I was still getting rackets strung on a Serrano at Duke University.
     
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  7. MAX PLY

    MAX PLY Hall of Fame

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    Actually my first Ektelon was a D which I got used from a sporting goods shop that was closing--and that was in the mid-70s. My first H was in the mid 80s--85 or 86 I believe.

    I am not sure that vintage machines have much value as collectibles but maybe a Serrano (or one from the article I note below) might be an interesting conversation piece in a study with an antique racquet mounted in it. But you need both the room and an understanding spouse.

    You might want to check out this article:

    http://tennishistory.com.au/2008/07/stringing-machines/
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2013
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  8. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    I have 2 Serrano 550b machines. 1, I got for parts about 10 yrs ago. I'll eventually get around to restoring one of them, using parts from both.
     
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  9. Lakers4Life

    Lakers4Life Hall of Fame

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    Every once in a while someone is selling a used Serrano in my area.
     
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  10. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    It sounds sacreligious, but I'l probably lock up the weight arm and put a Wise on it.
     
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  11. MAX PLY

    MAX PLY Hall of Fame

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    Oh No--You need an exorcism to cure that instinct. I think it would be very neat to restore it to new condition-then donate it to the Tennis Hall of Fame. It really did represent a breakthrough in racquet stringing.
     
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  12. Topspin101

    Topspin101 Rookie

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    Great article. Thank you MAX PLY.
     
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  13. jim e

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    Heres a picture of my old Serrano. It was a good machine back in the day. I purchased that back in 1968.Its a real relic compared to my Pro Master.
    It would still be usable today if I purchased the upgrade kit years ago, as that made it possible to string the larger racquets of today. I still use it once in a while when a wooden racquet comes my way to string.

    [​IMG]
     
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  14. Lakers4Life

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    Dang 1968, that's as old as me. :)

    How much was a Serrano circa 1968, Jim?
     
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  15. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    I paid $200.00 for it and it was well used at that time. machine was probably made in the 20's. the old timer that sold it to me spent as day to teach me to string. I was then on my own, no videos, no internet , no USRSA,or sites like this one back then. People that want to learn to string have it easier now.
    Back then I charged string price + $10.00 labor. Thats back when gasoline was approx. 28 cents/ gal. Seems like what some stringers charge now that they never heard of inflation over the last 40+ years.
     
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  16. Lakers4Life

    Lakers4Life Hall of Fame

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    $200 back then was a lot of money. About $1300 in todays money. Really, Serranos were made back in the 20s? I've seen prices on Serranos go from "FREE, take it away" to $500.

    Most shops charge a mininum $15-$20 labor not including string costs. Some places even higher.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2013
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  17. Adles

    Adles Rookie

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  18. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    That's about USD $3089 then you will need to add shipping and import duty. What a deal, and you will have a brand new antique!
     
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  19. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    We had a Serrano and a near-identical Oliver(with a busted pedal brake...had to e-a-s-e the tension on to keep the string from snapping)...took about twice as long to string on the Oliver. This was in the mid-'70s until we got our first Ektelon. Got spoiled for a few years until I moved to Atlanta and worked at a shop that had FIVE Serranos(before switching completely to Prince P-100/200). Fortunately, the club where I strung had Ektelon and I bought one for myself. Then Babolat came along with the Star, Star 2 and Star 3...great machines.

    True Tension sold quite a few machines in North Carolina in the '80s, but I don't recall seeing them in Atlanta. Maybe it was the same sales rep that sold the gahd-awful turf and sand courts all over the Carolinas. :)
     
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  20. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Between having to twist the clamp handles to grip the strings and then hand-stretching Fairway grip installations all day, it's no wonder I had a 15" right forearm back then! Still got nasty tennis elbow(that was exacerbated by installing leather grips for many many rackets each day :( ) when I added teaching/playing each day to the mix.
     
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  21. MAX PLY

    MAX PLY Hall of Fame

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    Ditto on the turf/sand (I believe they were called Omni courts)--unsuitable for playing tennis while upright. I, likewise, was in the Carolinas in the 70s-mid-80s, almost universally Ektelons with an occasional Serrano or TT. Strung a lot of Blue Star, Gold Twist and Leoina 66 in those days in woodies, Head Masters and Pros, and Yonex greens and golds.
     
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  22. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Coachrick yes they had some of the AstroTurf/sand courts at the old Marietta CC here and they were called Omni courts.
     
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  23. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    I think I played on those once. Blackburn had at least a half-dozen of those with a few that stayed in the shade. Those courts were wet ALL the time!

    When I traveled through North Carolina, 'they' said the turf courts were a way to get a clay court 'cushion' without worrying about freezing. That may have been all they were 'good at'. In addition to Omni-Court, it seems like one brand was called Tennis-Turf or some such. Nasty stuff :(
     
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  24. PBODY99

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    Willingboro, NJ replaced their Omni courts a few years ago. Astro turf shoes worked to keep you upright.
     
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  25. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    PLayed alot on Omni Courts in the mid 80's, Durham, NC.

    Easy to slip on and get road-rash/strawberry from the loose sand. The amount of sand applied affected the court's speed, footing, etc.
     
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  26. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    I think the turf courts had about half a chance IF you groomed them every other game! ;) I played on one that was groomed 'to exact specs' and it wasn't too bad until they showed some 'wear' from play...sand shifting, exposed turf that was grabby when dry but slick when wet, etc. Also, it seemed folks installed them over less than perfect base courts in an attempt at a 'band-aid' re-furb of inferior courts. Any inconsistency in the base surface was magnified by the addition of the turf/sand. There was a time in my tennis life that "any court is better than NO court"; but I'd rather not play than have to play on turf :). Feed a lesson? no worries...practice quick volley drills? fine...actually PLAY on the stuff...no thanks. I'm glad the turf courts virtually disappeared in the late '80s and '90s....kinda like stringing on a Serrano! ;)
     
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  27. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    The Omni Courts i played were nice, well groomed and maintained. I didn't mind them, it was kinda fun and different
    but at the same time, I'd rather have been on hard or clay.
    any day.


    edit: they were kinda rough on strings too.
     
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