volley types

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by hacker_101, Oct 29, 2013.

  1. hacker_101

    hacker_101 New User

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    76
    Hi,

    I was my practicing with my club pro and I was working on high putaway volleys from mid court.

    Some things I worked on:

    A lot of forward momentum (sprinting forward).
    racquet back a little bit farther than normal.
    follow through to the target (almost feels like a slap).
    wrist was a bit looser.

    It worked fantastic! Never had so much pace on my volleys.

    My question is will I shorten up the backswing, wrist firmer and block instinctively when someone blasts the ball at me?

    This coming from an aggressive baseliner who wants to become more of an all-courter.

    Thanks.
     
    #1
  2. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2011
    Messages:
    4,370
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    My opinion -

    The stretch-shortening cycle plays a part in volleying. Have not yet found references discussing volleying and the SSC. Anyone have a reference?

    Maybe when you sprint forward you stretch some new muscles that are then used when you volley. I don't think that it takes a lot of SSC to add considerable pace. I can see SSC to some degree in most pro volleys. If you take some high speed videos of your new volleys they might show more use of the SSC.

    If the arm is up or the forearm and racket are up, with the elbow joint at an angle, stretch will occur when you accelerate the body or shoulder forward.

    I once gave myself a golfer's elbow injury trying to strongly force a volley using ISR - that motion is dangerous.

    See especially "Volley Secrets" by Bret Hobden and his "Racket loses the collision". Learn it for hard balls hit at you when the opponent is back and a drop volley is indicated.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2013
    #2
  3. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2006
    Messages:
    8,657
    It could also help to have a hitting pal, etc. specifically workout your reaction volleys. In my experience with helping high school players get more comfortable around the net, this is an essential.

    Get in your regular net position and have someone set up at the opposite service line with a bucket of balls. When I'm the feeder for this, I hold my racquet up on the throat so that I can pop-pop-pop a lot of feeds at high frequency, but not high velocity. The objective here fro the volleyer is to get used to quickly getting the strings on the ball and instantly resetting for the next incoming shot. The ball is driven mostly with footwork and almost no racquet manipulation through contact.

    Reaction volleys work for shots with no setup time compared with those putaways where we can actually take a small back swing before the ball shows up. I think that they both need practicing because the putaways are rather unique and the reaction volleys can't be thought through. They need to happen reflexively and that only comes with some repetition.
     
    #3
  4. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2011
    Messages:
    4,370
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    How does the footwork drive the volley?
     
    #4
  5. hawk eye

    hawk eye Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Messages:
    2,090
    The volley- though there are different types indeed, like putaway/reaction, singels/doubles- should imo not made too complex with the ssc stuff and so on. It works best when it's made as simple as possible. Yes sometimes you've got to add some pace to the ball, and other times you've got to absorb it more: the collision thing. That's a question of feel, grip tension plays a major part here. And you've got to have your racket angel right, and your contact point. It's more of an instinctive shot than a hit from the baseline. An attacking mindset- play the ball before it plays you- , is important here. The technique basics are not that hard to get down, but in match play you have to really believe you're going win the point when you approach the net/ are already at net as is often the case in doubles. When you're up there feeling like a deer in headlights, you're in trouble.
     
    #5
  6. PhrygianDominant

    PhrygianDominant Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2012
    Messages:
    2,018
    That is a volley that I should work on myself. The other time I have heard of different types of volleys would be the losing/meeting/winning the collision idea. I will see if I can find a video when I get home.
     
    #6
  7. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    37,229
    Location:
    East side of San Francisco Bay
    No.
    Every volley from different parts of your court is different, and need to be practiced sometime, before you can implement it in a match.
    You can go "on the fly", but that only works when you're playing great, and totally fails you when you are not at the top of your game.
    Better to drill all the different volleys from all the different parts of the court.
    That is what separated my D-3 top singles buds from me. When were very even until team DRILLS started to work for them. For instance, forehand low volleys from 3' inside the service line. THEY worked on CC drops, deep DTL's, and CC deep low volleys from the forehand side. I went to go surfing.
    After 6 months, they had their volleys down, while I could surf any break in the world, at the very top levels, but missed some of my volleys or forgot how to put them cleanly away.
     
    #7
  8. Raul_SJ

    Raul_SJ Professional

    Joined:
    May 19, 2011
    Messages:
    1,342
    Location:
    San Jose, California
    Never heard mid-court volleys described as putaways.

    The usual strategy is to just return these mid-court volleys back deep. Not to put them away.
     
    #8
  9. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    37,229
    Location:
    East side of San Francisco Bay
    If you can volley, you can hit forcing volleys, mostly ending up to be clean putaways, from the service lines.
    The goal is to place your volleys deep and close to the lines, with some pressure on the ball. Baseline is No.1 importance, but sidelines also.
    Don't believe it? Do this drill. YOU stand at your service line, dead center, and have your practice bud drill you with his passing shot, drop feed. Once you get the first volley back deep, he cannot pass you.
    He cannot pass you because you have volleyed deep, you don't give him time to set up a pass attempt, and you move sideways to cover where your volley was hit, taking away his easiest angles.
    Now if you can't volley, you will lose the point every time, but if you can't volley, maybe PRACTICE?
     
    #9
  10. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2006
    Messages:
    8,657
    Split step with forward momentum to encourage a forward move through every volley. With extra time, that putaway can include some form of backswing, but a reaction volleys doesn't allow for much more than getting the racquet behind the ball. If the hitter is routinely set up to make a forward move on every incoming ball, that can usually furnish some forward drive, even when the incoming shot is really fast.
     
    #10
  11. coaching32yrs

    coaching32yrs Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2010
    Messages:
    449
    I have been serve and volleying at a good level for many years. How do you teach it? You teach the basics. 1. The split step, 2. The ready position, 3. The basic form. The rest of the development comes from experience. There are at least 9 variations on the volley. The ball coming very fast or very slow- they are volleyed different. High or low. etc. Volley is partly a matter of belief. When I play I believe I dictate from the net. I take away a piece of the court from my opponent and force him to hit a more difficult shot. And don't forget the overhead. Most pros don't teach it well. Without an excellent overhead you simply cannot come to the net.
     
    #11
  12. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    37,229
    Location:
    East side of San Francisco Bay
    Don't forget a short memory, and a go for it attitude, to SHORTEN every point and end it ASAP.
     
    #12
  13. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2011
    Messages:
    4,370
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    How does it furnish some forward drive?

    1) add forward speed to the racket?
    = to forward body motion speed?

    2) other mode of "furnishing forward drive" --?
     
    #13
  14. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2006
    Messages:
    8,657
    Right - use your forward step to effectively carry the racquet through contact. An ultra-compact move of the racquet (with the arm) becomes compounded by the forward body motion. If you've ever heard the thought "volley with your feet", this is what it's suggesting for an energized volley with little arm movement.
     
    #14
  15. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2011
    Messages:
    4,370
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    Do you mean only that the velocity of the body movement is added to the racket movement?

    I would guess since the body moves forward and stops in such a short distance that the peak body speed would not be very high. I'd have to estimate from some videos how fast the volleyers might be moving their bodies forward. ?

    I believe that if you move your body forward and stretch muscles that those muscles can shorten to move the racket much quicker (than body forward speeds) even over a relatively short distance. That SSC mode would add more velocity to the racket head than adding the body speed.
     
    #15
  16. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    37,229
    Location:
    East side of San Francisco Bay
    Gains are not always obvious.
    A body moving forwards will allow you to volley with some force while retaining the short volley stroke.
    It also puts you into position for the NEXT shot, the putaway.
    As you gain more volleying experience, you can lengthen your volley stroke, resulting in more power, or stroke your volleys more forcefully, again gaining more power.
    Since most volleys are hit somewhat under say .... 45 mph, a slight gain can be a very real impact on your opponent's time to set up and hit his passing shots.
     
    #16

Share This Page