Was he a Jerk?

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by Attila the tennis Bum, Mar 31, 2007.

?

Who is the jerk?

  1. The reciever is a jerk (The Saw Mill Club player)

    39.3%
  2. The server/author is a jerk (James martin tennis magazine Editor)

    9.0%
  3. They are both jerks.

    43.8%
  4. neither of them are jerks.

    1.0%
  5. undecided.

    7.0%
  1. Attila the tennis Bum

    Attila the tennis Bum Banned

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    Secret identity of the most famous Jerk in USTA league.

    Did you guys read the tennis mag article this month "A season on the Edge"?

    The author tells a story of a jerk he played in league. But he intentionally keeps the identity of the team and the player a secret to "protect the guilty".

    Well the secret is now out!! The team he is talking about is the Saw Mill Club in Westchester NY and the player he is talking about is Rich Callwood .

    How do I know?? Well all you have to do is plug in the authors name James Martin into the USTA website. Next you look up his matches in 4.5 league. There is only one match where his opponent defaulted and it was Rich Callwood of the Saw Mill Club. ( he mention in the article that his opponent defaulted and that it was 4.5 league).

    Call me Sherlock Holmes.:) Here is the article:


    Here is PART of the article:

    A Season on the Edge
    by James Martin

    League Tennis is fun, but it has a dark side. Just ask the author, who joined a U.S.T.A. team for the first time last year. (Names have been left out to protect the innocent -- and the guilty.)

    Competition warps the minds of men. grown men with families. Men with highfalutin-sounding jobs. Men, in other words, who should know better.

    There's no other way I can begin to explain the theater of the absurd that unfolded last spring during one of my USTA 4.5 league matches. I had just taken the court for the second singles against my opponent, a dapper Englishman with a yachtsman's tan. The trouble began when I was taking my warm-up serves.

    "Foot fault," my opponent said.
    "Excuse me?"
    "You're foot faulting."

    In my 25 years of playing tennis, I'd never been called for a foot fault during a match (I'm not saying I haven't crossed the all-important white line, but no one's taken me to task for doing it). And during warm-ups? I walked up to my service line. "Don't even think about it," I said. "Don't start."

    I returned to the baseline and hit another practice serve. "You're foot faulting," he said. "You can't do that."

    I had a strong suspicion why he was acting like this. Fifteen minutes earlier, I had been in the lounge watching my team's captain play his match. The Englishman was there, too, upset that my skipper was, in his word, "bullying" his opponent. Whatever the reality, it was clear both players were sniping at each other over line calls. My soon-to-be opponent inched closer to the glass and said to his friend standing nearby, "Look, he's foot faulting." He tried pointing this out to his player from behind the glass. He eventually walked onto the court, interrupted play, and accused my captain of foot faulting.

    Now, as I stood eyeballing my opponent, his motivation seemed clear. "Listen," I said. "I want to have a nice match. Whatever's going on over there" --I pointed to the other court--"leave it there. Let's not start this here."

    "Well, your captain started it," he said.

    My 8-year-old daughter could have constructed a better argument, but it left me with little place to go. The man spoke softly with a dignified air, a stark contrast to the nonsense he was spewing. The combination made him seem slightly sinister. As he pressed his point, he reminded me of a villain from a James bond movie, a diabolical blue blood hellbent on destroying 007. Unfortunately, his plot for revenge was being carried out on me. As we continued to argue, I grew agitated. I don't know why--maybe because I've never been in such a bizarre altercation, perhaps it was the negative vibes in the air--but something took hold of me. Possessed me. I went from the voice of reason to the voice of madness.

    "Look, if you're not going to play properly, let's take it outside," I said.

    "Take it outside?" Who did I think I was, Russell Crowe? Adrenaline had overwhelmed my internal editor. "Let's step outside," I repeated, before throwing in a "Don't [expletive] with me" for good measure.

    No, no one was going to win a sportsmanship award today.

    We walked back to our respective baselines. I can't speak for him, but I'm guessing he was shell-shocked after my outburst. He blasted his practice serves as hard as he could--right at me. He muttered that this was how you're supposed to serve, without foot faulting. Now he's giving me a tennis lesson? I thought. Oh, it was on! Risking a dislocated shoulder, I returned the favor by serving bullets back at him. Clearly, I'd lost my mind.

    By the time the match finally started, I had never been more fired up on a tennis court. And that's when things turned really weird. After breaking him to start the match, I prepared to serve. But he didn't have his racquet in the ready position. He stood there with one hand on his hip. I served the ball in.

    "Foot fault," he said, pointing to my feet and shaking his head disapprovingly.

    I was as dumbstruck as K-Fed in a library. "I'm taking the point," I shouted, and headed to the ad side. Another serve. He let that one go, too. That was 30-love in my book. Completely rattled, I double-faulted on the next point. Keep it together, I told myself. Serve underhand if you have to, just get the ball in! I was on the verge of hyperventilating by this point, and my arm felt like a lead pipe. But I was able to muscle my racquet up and over my head and meekly push two balls into the serve box, which he made no attempt to return. Two-love, me.

    My opponent looked toward his teammate in the lounge as if to say, "Can you believe this guy?" After he lost the first point of the next game, he walked to the sideline, grabbed his bag, and, without a word, walked off the court. "Where are you going?" I said. "Let's finish this." No response. My captain, still playing on an adjacent court, shouted, "Let him go." He knew that our team would get a win. This strange debacle would go down in the books as a simple default.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2007
    #1
  2. Voltron

    Voltron Hall of Fame

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    Heh heh, nice find. I guess that guy is going to be forever marked then.
     
    #2
  3. Attila the tennis Bum

    Attila the tennis Bum Banned

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    Yeah...did you read what that jerk did?? He called a foot fault from the other side of the court! WOW!! Does anyone know this guy?? Has anyone ever played against him or played against the Saw Mill Club?
     
    #3
  4. Voltron

    Voltron Hall of Fame

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    Pffft, like I'd know
    I did, and that guy was a ******, plain and simple.
     
    #4
  5. EZRA

    EZRA Rookie

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    Great.... I'm playing 4.5 Westchester league this season
     
    #5
  6. joeyscl

    joeyscl Rookie

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    So what happened Exactly?
     
    #6
  7. Raiden.Kaminari

    Raiden.Kaminari Semi-Pro

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    LOL ... the power of the Internet.

    Plug in the author's name ... look up whoever defaulted against him. Instant info ;)

    Of course, he had to leave the opponent's name out because he might get sued for libel :(
     
    #7
  8. Attila the tennis Bum

    Attila the tennis Bum Banned

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    There was almost a fistfight on the court between the author James martin and this dude Callwood. Here is an excerpt from the article:

    "I had just taken the court for the second singles against my opponent, a dapper Englishman with a yachtsman's tan. The Trouble began when I was taking my warmup serves:

    "Foot fault" my opponent said .

    "Excuse me?"

    "you're foot faulting"

    In my 25 years of playong tennis, I'd never been called for a foot fault during a match (I'm not saying I haven't crossed the all-important white line, but no one's taken me to task for doing it). And during warm ups? I walked up to my service line, "don't even think about it ," I said. "Don't start."


    They started firing practice serves at each other as hard as they could. It gets even crazier with a fist fight almost breaking out but what ended up happening is that Callwood of the Saw Mill club simply gave up and walked off the court in the first set being down 3-0.

    Read the article it really sheds a new light on league play. It is the first article I have seen that talks about ringers and stacking in public. It is a must read!
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2007
    #8
  9. Serve and Volley

    Serve and Volley Banned

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    Here is PART of the article:

    A Season on the Edge
    by James Martin

    League Tennis is fun, but it has a dark side. Just ask the author, who joined a U.S.T.A. team for the first time last year. (Names have been left out to protect the innocent -- and the guilty.)

    Competition warps the minds of men. grown men with families. Men with highfalutin-sounding jobs. Men, in other words, who should know better.

    There's no other way I can begin to explain the theater of the absurd that unfolded last spring during one of my USTA 4.5 league matches. I had just taken the court for the second singles against my opponent, a dapper Englishman with a yachtsman's tan. The trouble began when I was taking my warm-up serves.

    "Foot fault," my opponent said.
    "Excuse me?"
    "You're foot faulting."

    In my 25 years of playing tennis, I'd never been called for a foot fault during a match (I'm not saying I haven't crossed the all-important white line, but no one's taken me to task for doing it). And during warm-ups? I walked up to my service line. "Don't even think about it," I said. "Don't start."

    I returned to the baseline and hit another practice serve. "You're foot faulting," he said. "You can't do that."

    I had a strong suspicion why he was acting like this. Fifteen minutes earlier, I had been in the lounge watching my team's captain play his match. The Englishman was there, too, upset that my skipper was, in his word, "bullying" his opponent. Whatever the reality, it was clear both players were sniping at each other over line calls. My soon-to-be opponent inched closer to the glass and said to his friend standing nearby, "Look, he's foot faulting." He tried pointing this out to his player from behind the glass. He eventually walked onto the court, interrupted play, and accused my captain of foot faulting.

    Now, as I stood eyeballing my opponent, his motivation seemed clear. "Listen," I said. "I want to have a nice match. Whatever's going on over there" --I pointed to the other court--"leave it there. Let's not start this here."

    "Well, your captain started it," he said.

    My 8-year-old daughter could have constructed a better argument, but it left me with little place to go. The man spoke softly with a dignified air, a stark contrast to the nonsense he was spewing. The combination made him seem slightly sinister. As he pressed his point, he reminded me of a villain from a James bond movie, a diabolical blue blood hellbent on destroying 007. Unfortunately, his plot for revenge was being carried out on me. As we continued to argue, I grew agitated. I don't know why--maybe because I've never been in such a bizarre altercation, perhaps it was the negative vibes in the air--but something took hold of me. Possessed me. I went from the voice of reason to the voice of madness.

    "Look, if you're not going to play properly, let's take it outside," I said.

    "Take it outside?" Who did I think I was, Russell Crowe? Adrenaline had overwhelmed my internal editor. "Let's step outside," I repeated, before throwing in a "Don't [expletive] with me" for good measure.

    No, no one was going to win a sportsmanship award today.

    We walked back to our respective baselines. I can't speak for him, but I'm guessing he was shell-shocked after my outburst. He blasted his practice serves as hard as he could--right at me. He muttered that this was how you're supposed to serve, without foot faulting. Now he's giving me a tennis lesson? I thought. Oh, it was on! Risking a dislocated shoulder, I returned the favor by serving bullets back at him. Clearly, I'd lost my mind.

    By the time the match finally started, I had never been more fired up on a tennis court. And that's when things turned really weird. After breaking him to start the match, I prepared to serve. But he didn't have his racquet in the ready position. He stood there with one hand on his hip. I served the ball in.

    "Foot fault," he said, pointing to my feet and shaking his head disapprovingly.

    I was as dumbstruck as K-Fed in a library. "I'm taking the point," I shouted, and headed to the ad side. Another serve. He let that one go, too. That was 30-love in my book. Completely rattled, I double-faulted on the next point. Keep it together, I told myself. Serve underhand if you have to, just get the ball in! I was on the verge of hyperventilating by this point, and my arm felt like a lead pipe. But I was able to muscle my racquet up and over my head and meekly push two balls into the serve box, which he made no attempt to return. Two-love, me.

    My opponent looked toward his teammate in the lounge as if to say, "Can you believe this guy?" After he lost the first point of the next game, he walked to the sideline, grabbed his bag, and, without a word, walked off the court. "Where are you going?" I said. "Let's finish this." No response. My captain, still playing on an adjacent court, shouted, "Let him go." He knew that our team would get a win. This strange debacle would go down in the books as a simple default.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2007
    #9
  10. rleidle

    rleidle New User

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    It's not libel if it is true. However, a private citizen has an expectation of privacy. Public figures like movie stars give up that right.
     
    #10
  11. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Neither one of them should get any pats on the back for their behavior that day.
     
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  12. Pleepers

    Pleepers Professional

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    I think the author should have written that article anonymously?
     
    #12
  13. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    I disagree with the author. I don't think he should be allowed to serve with his feet crossing the line and his opponent should have a right to protest it if he sees it happening. And asking him to take it outside is a little out of line.

    I don't understand why the opponent would comment on foot-faulting during warmups, but in a match its fine.
     
    #13
  14. goober

    goober Legend

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    Well if you read the story, his opponent went onto the court of a previous match and interrupted play to accuse the author's captain of footfaulting-something he had no right to do as a spectator. Asking to take it outside is out of line, but they both exhibited terrible behavior.
     
    #14
  15. Raiden.Kaminari

    Raiden.Kaminari Semi-Pro

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    Yes, poor sportsmanship by one player isn't excuse for another to react to it ... but it is human nature unfortunately.

    For someone who claims to be knowledgable about rules, going onto a court and interrupting the match to declare foot faults was out of line. Then declaring foot faults across the court in a singles match was also out of line. For doubles, your partner would be able to call warning about the foot faults, but a court monitor would have to be called in order to actually call the foot fault.
     
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  16. nyc

    nyc Hall of Fame

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    sounds like james martin is a bit of a hot head himself, regardless whether the other guy's a jerk.

    "Look, if you're not going to play properly, let's take it outside," I said. ????

    I mean, it's LEAGUE tennis, it's supposed to be fun, not some kinda bar brawl.

    :rolleyes:
     
    #16
  17. goober

    goober Legend

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    I did find it funny though during the final match of the season for the top spot, the opposing team brings in this self rated player with a heavy Spanish accent, that didn't even know who was on the team he was showing up for. He then proceeds to blow the #1 player for the authors team off the court. :)
     
    #17
  18. Serve and Volley

    Serve and Volley Banned

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    I disagree. There is no way you can see if someone is foot faulting from the other side of the court. Unless of course its a HUGE foot fault. But from the other side of the court you really cannot see that well enough to make the call. Its ridiculous. The dude from the Saw Mill Club was way out of line.
     
    #18
  19. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Whether you agree or disagree is immaterial. The Code gives a player the right to first warn, then call foot faults on their opponent. Just because your eyesight is unable to percieve foot faults doesn't mean everyone else's is.

    Both players were out of line, IMO.
     
    #19
  20. kylebarendrick

    kylebarendrick Professional

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    Keep in mind that he was calling foot faults during the warm-up! That can't be anything other than trying to game your opponent.
     
    #20
  21. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Agreed. I was talking about during the game.
     
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  22. Serve and Volley

    Serve and Volley Banned

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    No its not my eyesight its all human beings eyesight. There is just no way humanly possible a human can fairly see a slight foot fault from the other side of the court. Thats why in professional tennis only the basline Judge or the main one can call the foot fault. The far Judge is not even allowed to make that call. Ever wonder why??? Because its impossible for a himan to make that call from that vantage point.

    Think about it,.....when you hit a ball close to the baseline you basically have to trust your opponent to make that call because its tough for you to see it. A minor footfault is even more difficult to see.

    The dude from Saw Mill was out of line.

    There is just no way you can honestly make that call unless its a HUGE HUGE foot fault.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2007
    #22
  23. Attila the tennis Bum

    Attila the tennis Bum Banned

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    Really? That means that you are going to play against the Saw Mill club! You have got to report back to us if they are as much jerks as the article says they are.

    I heard some really nasty stories about those guys. I heard they pulled a really gross move in doubles.

    The net man of the receiving team actually stood in the box where the serve was to be served into!! This is completely legal but damn is that distracting!!
     
    #23
  24. rfprse

    rfprse Professional

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    .
    Can he do this despite the opponent called foot fault?
     
    #24
  25. rfprse

    rfprse Professional

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    Maybe Tennis magazine should invite the person in question to write his side of story about the incident & to vent on something like what a jerk the author was...? :)
     
    #25
  26. Attila the tennis Bum

    Attila the tennis Bum Banned

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    Dude if some jerk called a foot fault on me from way over on the other side of the court then there would be a battle. I'm sorry, I dont care what the hell the rules say...you just cannot make that call all the way from the other side of the court. That type of a call would get anyone angry.

    Look at todays match when Canas got called for it. He freaked out!! And that was a legit call by someone at the baseline. Can you imagine of the ump from way over on the other end had made that call?? It would have been a war!

    Now put that into perspective. In USTA you are concentrating on returning a hard 4.5 serve and also making the call if the ball is in or out. Now do you also think its humanly possible to call a foot fault as well??
     
    #26
  27. Ace

    Ace Semi-Pro

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    hahah, yeah, you can look up that name too. Raul Mendez. He's a 5.0 now.
     
    #27
  28. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Then why is calling foot faults on an opponent specifically ALLOWED by the Code?
     
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  29. rfprse

    rfprse Professional

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    And what's the relevence? You have sympathy for the author? You'd acted the same way? Good for you.
    I would get pissed, too. Just what's that has to do with my post?:confused:
    (However, I would've asked for a judge from either team to watch for the foot fault.)

    If you don't get the joke and what would be funny if the "jerk" in the article wrote back a rebuttal against the author describing the author as a jerk, it's fine.

    On the serious side, I think the author took advantage of his position and took a public shot at the guy.
    Why not give the other guy fair shot and access to the media? It'll be fun, if not to see how the story could change from the other side. :)
     
    #29
  30. ximian

    ximian Rookie

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    you'll have to show me the code, because I've always been under the impression that your opponent can only warn you of foot faulting, never call you on it. Only a USTA official can call foot faults.
     
    #30
  31. EZRA

    EZRA Rookie

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    I'm actually looking forward to this... the schedule's not up yet so I don't know when we're meeting that team. I've been checking the rosters, that infamous guy hasn't signed up yet but the story's author is already on his team's roster.
     
    #31
  32. goober

    goober Legend

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    Throw a little humor in your match and call him on a couple of foot faults during warm up :) Then add, " Don't even think about taking this outside, before I took up tennis, cage fighting was my sport."
     
    #32
  33. tennismike33

    tennismike33 Semi-Pro

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    I played in a tournament this weekend where all of the players were NTRP 4.5 and higher. From the vantage point of seating abovethe court 3 out of 4 of the players playing on the first 2 courts were guilty of foot faulting. One guy was so bad he had BOTH feet inside of the baseline, you would think that players at that level would KNOW they are foot faulting.

    Fewer and fewer tournaments have roving umpires and there is less and less emphasis placed on this item of the serve when pros are teaching the serve. Watching many teaching sessions I can't remember any professional teacher mention to a client to watch the FF. I am not sure why there are fewer umpires, tournament directors don't even walk around the courts.
     
    #33
  34. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    You are incapable of looking it up yourself? There is a great line in the movie Arthur which I am tempted to use here but since this is a family forum...

    http://dps.usta.com/usta_master/usta/doc/content/doc_13_2292.pdf

    See #24.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2007
    #34
  35. goober

    goober Legend

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    Calling flagrant foot fault is allowed by the code. I doubt if somebody has been playing tennis as the author claims (25 years) and apparently in competitive situations and has never been called for a foot fault even once that he is making flagrant foot faults. If it were that obvious his opponent should have called an official.
     
    #35
  36. Ace

    Ace Semi-Pro

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    An official? Who's USTA league (during the regular league season) has officials?
    We have some guy that gives us balls and numbers, then goes and drinks our beer with our spectators!
     
    #36
  37. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Goober, why are you saying this like I don't know it? Where have I said anything to support the idea that the player playing the jerk was actually foot faulting? Someone said that a player CAN'T call any foot faults on an opponent. I responded that they can and posted the link to the Code to support my assertion.

    I know the player calling foot faults in this case was being a dick. All I was arguing is that the Code does allow him to call those foot faults, not that he was right in calling them the way he did.

    And as someone else has already pointed out, you must play in a very high and mighty USTA league if you have officials on hand for your matches.
     
    #37
  38. goober

    goober Legend

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    When I say officials I am not saying an official USTA referee only. Many USTA leagues allow for "court monitors" which is a person acceptable to both sides that can over rule calls if asked and can call footfaults.

    I can remember getting court monitors setup for several matches ahead of time when we knew the opposing team called things close or participated in other shannigans.



    .
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2007
    #38
  39. goober

    goober Legend

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    I probably should not have quoted you. My comments were more a general comment not directed specifically at you- that yes foot faults are allowed to be called in the code but I have doubts about if it applied in this case.
     
    #39
  40. nyc

    nyc Hall of Fame

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    Maybe it's time to start a Fight Club League and bring wooden racquets back...
     
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  41. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Ok, carry on then, because I agree with that 100%. :-D I thought you were addressing me specifically because of the quote.
     
    #41
  42. Attila the tennis Bum

    Attila the tennis Bum Banned

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    The key word is "FLAGRANT".

    The bottom line I think is if someone is flagrantly foot faulting so that he gets a huge advantage in getting to the net then one should absolutely make that call!!

    On the other hand if someone is like a centimeter over the line or someone footfaults the way Canas did today the who really gives a damn!! Just play the freaking match!
     
    #42
  43. Attila the tennis Bum

    Attila the tennis Bum Banned

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    Did you realluy play against the Saw Mill club or are you just making a joke? If you did I would love to hear what happened in your story.
     
    #43
  44. Attila the tennis Bum

    Attila the tennis Bum Banned

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    #44
  45. Kevo

    Kevo Hall of Fame

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    I see people foot fault all the time in my league. Some guys do it practically every serve. It's easy to see. Most of the time its a step or a slide before contact. I don't call these anymore though. I almost got into it with a guy one time because I called him for a foot fault. Man was he pissed. He claimed that I only called it because his serve was an ace, but I called it immediately and didn't even attempt to return the serve. I told him that he had been foot faulting for quite some time and at this point he was 6 inches over the line and I couldn't overlook it anymore. He was yelling and calling me names. He calmed down after a minute, but when the match was over he muttered some more names under his breath and I asked him what he said. That was a mistake. It almost came to blows. Anyway, I decided I wouldn't call them any more, and I don't. Almost 50% of the players in my 4.0 league foot fault. The only time I mention it any more is after the match as a courtesy in case they care. Some people have apologized and some have thanked me for mentioning it. No one has gotten upset about it. Makes me wonder what would have happened if I called it in the match though.
     
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  46. EZRA

    EZRA Rookie

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    I was playing a mixer this Winter and we were playing for a place for the playoffs. The previous match a week before turned ugly and there were cheating, shouting, and threats involved between players and team captains that an offical had to show up and officiate the deciding match.
    There was only one guy looking over 3 courts and every now and then he would make line calls call foot-fault calls. It was actually very effective and people stayed calm and civilized throughout the match... sad to say our team got beat.
     
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  47. AndrewD

    AndrewD Legend

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    Seriously, just because it appears in a magazine, everyone seems to think that the author's version of events is gospel. How in the world do we know that the author isn't the one in the wrong and that the other guy, after warning him several times that he was foot-faulting (and yes, it can be so obvious you can see it from the opposite baseline), decided to call it quits rather than put up with such deliberate cheating? That is an entirely possible scenario.

    Just remember, he who writes history, makes history.
     
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  48. jelle v

    jelle v Hall of Fame

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    LOL :mrgreen:

    Great thread this is.. it demonstrates how fanatic everybody gets when you're playing league-tennis. Doesn't matter what the level of play is, it will always generate a "us versus them" attitude among the players. Everybody wants to win and everybody get's that warrior-like feeling. It's pure war on the tenniscourts, no matter what level. :mrgreen:

    I don't know the USTA rules, but the man calling the footfault actually was right in my opinion, strictly speaking. If it was necessary to call the footfault, that is another question, depends on how big the footfault was I guess. I don't call footfaults when I notice them. One opponent of mine (a female - it was mixed doubles-) actually took one giant step into the court. Must have passed the baseline by about two feet. Didn't call it.

    And yes, you can see a footfault from players on the other side. You can see the baseline can't you? But with your eyes on your opponents feet it will be more difficult to get a decent return.
     
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  49. Attila the tennis Bum

    Attila the tennis Bum Banned

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    I guess it really depends on how bad the foot fault is. Lets face it if someone steps over the line by a centimeter you are not going to notice it. And even if you were somehow able to notice it does it really make a difference?

    On the other hand a flagrant foot fault is a whole dofferent issue.

    I believe in this present case at the 4.5 level there could not be much of a foot fault. Plus the dude from Saw Mill was calling foot faults during warm up!

    Finally if you read the article the dude from Saw Mill admitted that he was calling them because the captain of the Saw Mill team was having a line call problem with the authors team!
     
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  50. Attila the tennis Bum

    Attila the tennis Bum Banned

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    Even a minor one? Then answer this question. In professional tennis why is the line Judge from the other end of the court barred from making such a call?

    But even more importantly does a very minor footfault really even make a difference?
     
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