Was tennis elbow an issue 20-30ys ago?

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Zverev, Dec 7, 2004.

  1. Zverev

    Zverev Professional

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    I wonder if anyone here can shed some light on the following:
    Whether people that played with wooden and aluminium frames used to get tennis elbow too.

    I have started playing with aluminium frame from Kmart and
    was hitting with it more than 6 months without any problems.
    Then I got "serious" about the game and have bought new generation hyper carbon HH2.7 and got TE in one game.

    Since then I have switched to players' sticks, got rid of TE,
    but got GE instead, playing with Cat 10 and NXT at low lbs.
    Perfectly healthy combination.
    This chain of injuries just seems endless.
    Maybe my technique is not perfect, though it didn't get worse from the time I hit with aluminium. Back then I really didn't have a clue how to hit the ball, though didn't have any problems.
    Funny. There is something unhealthy about this game.
    If I go out to play soccer, it doesn't really matter how I smack the ball, it won't brake my leg, it doesn't matter how I throw the ball into the basket - it won't break my arm.
    There is something inherently wrong with this game, though.
    So back to the original question, was it so 20-30 years ago?
    Any TE/GEs back then?
     
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  2. Morpheus

    Morpheus Professional

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    Tennis Elbow has always been a problem, but in the past it was usually the result of poor mechanics. You would often see the "beginners" (older gents who were started playing later in life) with bands on their forearms and a grimace on their face as they pushed the backhands with their elbows leading the way.

    Today, all players are subject to TE, and it has a lot to do with the lighter, longer, stiffer rackets. Not only are they hard on the arm, but they allow players to hit the ball a lot harder putting more stress on their arms.

    BTW, try playing soccer competitively when you are in your 40s. Tennis is a game for life, if you don't abuse your arm, that is...
     
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  3. Zverev

    Zverev Professional

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    I understand what you are saying, but..
    during the game...say you hit 100 balls correctly and just one using wrong technique.. I've seen one guy stuffed his elbow with one backhand shot. BTW he knows correct technique, got just a bit lazy(tired) at that moment.

    Say, I want to hit the ball any way I want - leading elbow, wristy forehand, etc, and still be OK.
    My thought is that it should be possible when weights of racquet and the ball are at correct ratio.
    I think that manufacturers shouldn't be allowed to go below that ratio, because it might lead to TE.
    I know, I here your objections, but, hey, we do ban some drugs that give complications in one out of a thousand.
    But if bad side effect is possible, the drug is banned.

    In how many people light 250 gramms tennis racquet will cauze tennis elbow?
     
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  4. coach

    coach Semi-Pro

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    the old wood racquets were 13-15 ounces... VERY heavy by today's standards. And if you have hit with one recently, you will realize just how much they bend in the throat area... with weight like that and flexibility, those two variables do a lot to dissipate a lot of the shock that you don't get today with the stiff, light racquets.
     
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  5. Marius_Hancu

    Marius_Hancu G.O.A.T.

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    TE was probably present 20-30 years ago, or Tony Roche wouldn't have gone through 2 surgeries (by 1972 or thereabouts).

    But definitely not as prevalent as today.
     
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  6. Marius_Hancu

    Marius_Hancu G.O.A.T.

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    I guess that the racket industry is pretty much un-regulated in this respect. Also, never heard of TE studies sponsored by them, or we wouldn't be here.
     
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  7. paulfreda

    paulfreda Hall of Fame

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    I think TE is a much greater problem now than it was 20-30 yrs ago because of what Coach said above. Wooden racquets were very heavy and flexible taking most of the energy from the ball. Today's light and stiff frames transmit that to the arm.
    Another factor is that I think far more older people play tennis now than 30 yrs ago. In 1960, a tour pro golfer was done at age 30. Now he can win 1 million on the Senior tour at age 60.
    This has caused a change in attitude among the baby boomers so many over 40's are playing now and using these light stiff racquets. That is why TE is a much bigger problem now I think.
     
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  8. Morpheus

    Morpheus Professional

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    Yes, demographics are changing, but the more relevant question to ponder is to what extent younger players are running into TE. I have concluded that TE used to be a function of poor form and, therefore, it affected "beginners" especially those who started late in life (e.g., 30+ years old). Today, it impacts players of all ages, regardless of skill level.

    On the other hand, the new rackets make the game more enjoyable for many...
     
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