weird drill

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by rosewall4ever, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. rosewall4ever

    rosewall4ever Semi-Pro

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  2. Blake0

    Blake0 Hall of Fame

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    To ensure shoulder turn maybe?..
     
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  3. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    I've been using a variation of this drill for the past couple of years. I'll have players extend their left arm (for a righty FH) and move their feet in order to catch the ball. However, instead of having the student in a closed stance, I'll have them catch when they are in a semi-open or a neutral stance. In my drill, the arm is extended directly to the side -- closer to parallel to the baseline. In this video, the arm is a bit forward which accounts for the closed stance.

    The arm extension has a 2-fold purpose. Once function is to promote an adequate shoulder turn, as Blake0 suggests. Another function of the extended arm is to use the left hand as a spatial reference -- it helps the players determine an optimal body position with respect to the incoming ball.

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  4. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    As I mentioned in the post above, the Japanese player catches the ball in an obvious closed stance. However after the catching drill, his stance in closer to neutral (or slightly closed). Once difference is the height of the contact point. when he catches and then drops the ball, his contact is somewhat low -- below his knees. However, in the FHs that he hits after this phase of the drill, his stance i nearly neutral and his contact point is higher -- above his knees.

    this brings up a good point. Even tho' the extended hand is used as a guide to help the player properly position himself with respect to the ball, the optimal distance from the contact point will be dependent on the height of contact. For very high bouncing balls (high contact point), it is important to give yourself more space -- the contact point will be further away from your body.
     
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  5. Tyrus

    Tyrus Professional

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    So well stated. But my theory would say that not only does the non-dominant hand give the spatial reference but it gives your eyes a target to focus on WHERE you want to hit the ball to ensure proper contact.
     
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  6. Tyrus

    Tyrus Professional

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    Much like how we also use the non-dominant hand on an overhead to give us a guide to where the ball is/where we want to hit it.
     
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  7. Jay_The_Nomad

    Jay_The_Nomad Professional

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    This drill appears to be a good way to teach students to bend their knees in order to get low to the ball.

    Notice the Japanese student doesn't move his hand to catch the ball. Instead, he bends his keens to get his left hand in position to catch the ball.
     
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  8. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    My pro did this drill with me about a year ago. He saw it in some ITF literature and wanted to see what happened with a real live student. That would be me.

    It was a great drill. Really great. It really focused me on what a correct FH is supposed to feel like regarding knee bend and position vis a vis the ball.
     
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  9. rosewall4ever

    rosewall4ever Semi-Pro

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    everyone thanks for reply.. sweet to get an insight on different drills and applications
     
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