What are grass courts made out of?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by KennyNguyen, Oct 10, 2005.

  1. KennyNguyen

    KennyNguyen Rookie

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    What are grass courts made out of? (i.e. type of soil, grass) Is it possible to make one yourself if you have some space? Sorry, I've never seen a grass court before except on television.
     
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  2. tennisboy87

    tennisboy87 Guest

    I think the ones at Wimbledon are made using rye grass, but I'm not 100% sure on that.
     
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  3. liionel

    liionel Rookie

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    grass? no? i think so. heh. syn. grass is my bet.
     
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  4. theace21

    theace21 Hall of Fame

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    I did a search just for the heck of it. It says the most common is the new variety of rye grass, but other are still used. Want to build a grass court. Check it out... Add the usual w w w and it should work...

    totaltennis.net/UploadedFiles/Content/6/pdf/a3.pdf
     
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  5. TENNIS2

    TENNIS2 Rookie

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    This is from Wimbledon official website:

    Court Maintenance
    • Court grass composed of 100% rye grass (chosen for its durability).
    • 1 tonne of grass seed is used each year.
    • Approximately ¾ million gallons of water are used on the grass courts each year.
    • Maximum of 3,000 gallons of water used during the Fortnight - weather permitting.
    • All courts re-lined, rolled and mown daily during Championships.
    • Court wear, surface hardness and ball rebound are all measured daily. In general, the men
    are tougher on the courts than the ladies.
    • The Championships playing height of grass is 8mm.
    • No! Paint is not used to colour the Centre Court green towards the end of the event.
    • Paint is not used to mark the lines on the court. A transfer wheel marker is used to apply a
    white compound (500 gallons used yearly) containing china clay to make it durable.
    • All the lines are 50mm wide, except the baselines, which are 100mm.
    • The amount a ball bounces is largely determined by the soil, not the grass. The soil must
    be hard and dry to allow 13 days of play without damage to the court sub-surface.
    • To achieve the required surface of even consistency and hardness, the courts are rolled
    and covered to keep them dry and firm. Regular measurements are taken to monitor this.
    • If the court is too soft, when the players run, jump and slide, the pimples on their shoes
    will damage the surface and increase the chance of an irregular bounce.
     
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  6. austro

    austro Professional

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    It is A LOT of hassle to keep a grass court in good shape. Our club has 4 and they only operate between March and October. Why do this to yourself? Personally, I like Astro Turf a lot, which is a sort of synthetic grass and can be played on at all times, even during rain (no puddles).
     
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