What can I do to pick up my singles game

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by gameboy, Nov 18, 2013.

  1. g4driver

    g4driver Hall of Fame

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    How would you know ? Do you watch ever 3.5 and 4.0 play tennis in the US? Wow, your like Santa Claus - you see and know all. That must be a very cool superpower. :cool:
     
    #51
  2. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    I disagree re: the lack of value of strategy in 3.5/4.0 singles. I used to "run around like my hair was on fire for two hours" like Cindy said. I'm older, slower and fatter now...and better...b/c I learned some strategy that I was not previously aware of.

    When things start going south I go back to good sound strategy of cross court till I get a weak/short ball and then hit an approach or hit a forcing angle shot. Dealing authoritatively with short balls is a must. Preparation and concentration are required b/c a lot of footwork, body position and awareness of how much court there is to work with are important. Its easy to flub an overhead by not getting sideways, hitting it behind you or not watching the ball to contact...or hit a short ball long or poorly if not aware of court position and getting your body to the side of the ball for a good stroke when running up to a ball.

    Here are bunch of links I've posted before about shot selection and recovery position. Most of them were posted by others before me. I just collected them and am reposting.

    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showpost.php?p=4804268&postcount=8

    I'm not a tennis expert, but there is no doubt these videos helped me. I used to just try to hit where my opponent was not. That was a recipe for me not only running around much more chasing his well hit cross-court shot to my open court but also me making the first error. Making an early decision on where I'm going to hit the ball, by having a strategy, also helps everything about my stroke and focus on the ball. My 2c.
     
    #52
  3. Gut4Tennis

    Gut4Tennis Hall of Fame

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    read brad gilberts book, " winning ugly" . then read it again a few weeks later
     
    #53
  4. g4driver

    g4driver Hall of Fame

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    You might try mixing that game plan up. It's too predictable IMO -

    When you are up 30-0, 40-5, get more aggressive and go for some winners, take some chances. I almost always do this on ROS if up by two points. If you miss, you're still up 30-15, or 40-30.

    If I'm up by 40-0, or 40-5 and someone tosses out a weak serve or a serve right in my wheelhouse, there is a 1 out of 3 chance he is going to see either:
    A) an inside out forehand cross court (or 2HBH angled cross court),
    B) DTL (off either side)- but try to avoid turning a ball DTL coming in from a server with a lot of pace (it's much easier to hit back XC until you get a slower ball), or
    C) a flat driving ball directly at the feet of the server.

    Try not to be predictable in singles. That seems to help my game. Give your opponent what they don't want - shots to their weaker side, running folks who don't move as well, and if you hit at someone at the net, keep your ball low. Make them dig for the volleys.

    In singles, no matter what (sun, wind, or how big the guys serve is ), I always receive first if win the racquet spin. My serve is the slowest part of my game to warm up. So I start out looking for a break. Brad Gilbert addresses this in "Winning Ugly", but I have been doing it for many years before reading his book.

    One other thing I've learned: when I am struggling to win my serve, I am very mindful of my energy level. The last thing I want is to get broken, then be tired when I receive his serve. If I can't win my serve by the third deuce, if it goes to deuce #4, I hit all remaining serves as simple spin serves. Nothing flat or kick. I've lost my serve after 5+ deuce scores and then run out of energy and can't break. That is the worse position to be in as a singles player. Tired as you serve and tired as you receiver.

    Learn to conserve energy as a singles player. Which means drinking more than water on the courts. I use 1/2 regular Gatorade 1/2 Water in a 1/2 gallon jug on ice. I bring GU Chews or CLIF Blocks to help in the heat of summer. But the ultimate pick up for me is Zico Chocolate Coconut Water. When you are hot and need a boost, this stuff taste like Yahoo. (Just make sure it's ice cold.)

    And don't serve from a wide doubles service spot. I see guys doing this, and it invites a driving ball to big hole they leave open. Move closer to the Center Service mark.
     
    #54
  5. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Yes, agreed. Which reminded me of another thing my coach said.

    He wasn't a fan of "find a weakness and pick on it." At the beginning of the match, your opponent's weaknesses are unknown. You can lose points probing for that weakness, and you may not have the tools to exploit it if you do find it.

    What you do know at the start of the match are *your* strengths. In my case, my FH was my preferred stroke. So I would hit to my opponent's FH with knowledge that she would likely come back to my FH. We would then see who had the better FH. If it turned out that she had the better FH, then that would be a good time to try to exploit her weakness.

    Also, AngleQueen, you reminded me of a ladies 4.0 match I watched recently. One of my singles players was *crushing* her opponent. I swear, it was hard not to laugh. My lady hits slice and is a master drop shot artist. For two hours, she would start a rally and then hit a drop shot or short slice. Opponent could not reach 1/3 of these shots at all. If opponent got there, she netted the ball or hit it long 1/3 of the time. If the opponent got there and pushed a ball into the court, my player lobbed her or passed her 1/3 of the time. The opponent had no answer.

    After I talked to my player, and she said she developed this style a few years back. She says it works against 4.0 singles specialists because they only know how to do two things: Hit groundies from the baseline and punish short sitters. Every now and then she will lose to a player with an excellent transition game, but that is usually just once a season.

    So, gameboy. If you can learn to hit quality short slice off of FH and BH, you will win SO much at 3.5/4.0. Even the fastest opponent will struggle to generate offense against low mid-court balls.
     
    #55
  6. Bdarb

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    Cindy has another approach she's mentioned on the forum, maybe purchase a club ;) Plenty of time to work on your game and as a club owner I promise you would be all set finding people who want to hit with you haha
     
    #56
  7. breezybee

    breezybee New User

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    Honestly that sounds a bit simplistic. I played someone like that last year. At first he was dominating with dropshots so spinny they almost went back over the net and wicked, wicked slice but after a few games I realised that in order to hit those shots you need to have time to set up for them. Shots driven into the court with a lot of pace and spin do not come back as little drop shots. Once I figured out that moving the ball around the court and keeping deep with pace put him off of his game I won the match.
     
    #57
  8. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    When I say "out of position," I'm not talking about two back. There is a time and place for two-back.

    "Out of position" means failing to move laterally and leaving huge holes in the court. Or failing to fall off the net when a smash is coming. Or missing poaching opportunities by hugging the alley. Or hanging on the net to hit whack-a-mole volleys, leaving your partner to cover 90% of the court. Or backpedaling to no-man's land because you are terrified to volley. Or letting a lob go over your head but not switching. Or not switching when your partner crosses to poach.

    On many of these errors, the player making them has no idea they just screwed up. It is maddening, because they often think the point was lost because their partner "didn't get that ball," unaware that there's a reason for that. :)
     
    #58
  9. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Sure, it is possible to beat someone who is hitting short slice. I'm just saying that it is a killer strategy at 4.0 ladies.

    I mean, we talked about exposing weaknesses. Many times people interpret this as looking for a weak FH or BH. I guess I'm saying that watching my teammate destroy a solid 4.0 singles specialist suggested that weaknesses can consist of floundering on low balls in the mid-court.
     
    #59
  10. breezybee

    breezybee New User

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    If you are playing someone who is slow then yes, definitely.

    The transition between doubles and singles is a tough one. I am a much better singles player than doubles. Probably because I really prefer to play singles so I seek it out more often even though I do think doubles is lots of fun.

    What Cindy is talking about when she sees singles players messing up so badly in doubles I see in reverse. There are a number of people who I regularly play doubles with. Some of these people play doubles almost exclusively and they are good. Kick my behind out there. When we play a singles match though, wow, what a difference. The court coverage and depth of shot is dreadful. We become sorely mismatched on the singles court.
     
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  11. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    Funny thing is I also employ very basic strategy for doubles, hit cross court for defensive shots, hit at the net guy for offensive shots and be aggressive when at the net, and it works great in doubles.

    Cindy, I have can/do and hit slices, and can hit a decent drop shot. I don't like to hit it during a social match, though, so I don't get enough practice to use it during the match.
     
    #61
  12. ian2

    ian2 Semi-Pro

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    This is a great post. I don't know if it does it for OP, but for me (and my troubles in singles) everything you said hits the nail on the head. Thank you!
     
    #62
  13. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    Good gawd, I will be playing singles for my 40+ team this week!!! I think this is my first USTA singles match.

    Any last minute advice?
     
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  14. maggmaster

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    Hit it where they aren't.
     
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  15. dizzlmcwizzl

    dizzlmcwizzl Hall of Fame

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    This is always good advice in league singles ...

    Relax, go for less, keep the ball in the court, hit it to his backhand.

    Adjust as necessary.
     
    #65
  16. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    The biggest things for me in order of increasing importance which have helped me improve my singles game have been:

    I lost about 15 pounds.

    I changed my racquet setup to all poly (Signum Pro Tornado) and leaded my racquet.

    I started regular strength training. This last one I believe has had more impact than the other two combined. I never thought of myself as weak before I started doing this about 4 months ago but now I know that I was. What I've been doing is mostly body weight work (pushups, chins, ab work) and also working on my grip with an Ivanko grip device which is like an adjustable Captains of Crush.

    I also got some bands I asked for this Christmas and have been working with them a couple of weeks but the bodyweight exercises have been the ones that have helped the most imo.

    I guess a fourth item is that I've made a conscious effort to try as much as possible to play with players who are as good or better than I am. I have an unfortunate tendency to play down to my competition and I've noticed that I play a lot better and make fewer UEs when I'm playing with better players.

    Th next thing I'm going to try is plyometrics!
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014
    #66
  17. g4driver

    g4driver Hall of Fame

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    How did the match go ? Good on you for playing singles regardless of the outcome- keep playing singles against a variety of players and you will keep getting better -

    Biggest piece of advice from me - don't give your opponent short balls. Better to consistently hit deep and occasionally hit a few balls out than to hit short. Hitting a ball short means you will lost a high percentage of these points. Compared to hitting deep and occasionally a ball out will still lead to more points won.
     
    #67
  18. Bdarb

    Bdarb Hall of Fame

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    backhand remark is not always true. I've played several players lately with stronger backhands than forehands. Especially women.


    Best single piece of advice I received from a coach is 'get comfortable being uncomfortable' which kind of speaks to adjust as necessary. You don't berate a player with your game and hope it works, find his weakness and exploit it. If you don't come to the net much but you notice everytime you do, he loses the point or overhits long, guess what you should do when it's a crucial point, regardless of your comfort zone?... This is the mark of a good player IMO. Tons of people can crush the ball, not everyone is vulnerable to a big ball, so find what does make them vulnerable and exploit that weakness, even if it's not your strength necessarily.
     
    #68
  19. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    The match is tonight. I will not have any opportunities to warm up beforehand, and I am someone who takes a good while to warm up. Will see how it goes...
     
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  20. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Yeah. last minute advice = don't spend any time watching/admiring your shot. Hit and recover, recover, recover.

    Good luck, man. My team is short a singles player for an upcoming match, and I am *SO* not going to volunteer.
     
    #70
  21. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    But Cindy, when you hit pretty a shot as I do, it is hard not to stop and stare.

    This will be interesting...
     
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  22. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Dude, I know.

    There's no more beautiful thing than the ball I just struck. . . .
     
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  23. Bdarb

    Bdarb Hall of Fame

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    That's what she...
     
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  24. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    Well, that didn't go as planned...

    There were only three courts available, so the doubles went first. I watched as we were getting killed on every match. We barely won one game in all three matches combined in the first set. We ended up losing all three matches, so there wasn't any pressure for me to win.

    I went out and warmed up, but 7 min isn't really enough. And the courts had very bright with background above the curtains and I had a really hard time picking up to the ball against it.

    Did I mentioned that my opponent was a lefty? GREAT, there goes my game plan...

    I hit every ball out. I mean every ball I hit was going out. And not just going out by inches, it was going out by a foot. I had no idea what was going on. Every stroke I made, the ball just took off and never came down. To make things even better, I double faulted at least two serves every game.

    I lost the first set 6-1 and I am not even sure how I broke my opponent for that one game. Everything was just weird for me as my opponent had a weak backhand that he was determined to hide as much as possible. He stood way over to the left so that he would not have to hit his backhand. (he had a good heavy forehand)

    My plan was to hit cross court and attack on short balls, but with the court so wide open, I tried to hit inside out forehand and everything was just going long. I don't think I hit more than 2 shots in a row before making an unforced error the entire first set.

    I didn't win my serve until the third game in the second set.

    With my stroke in shambles, I just started looping every ball back. When I could hit to his backhand deep, I attacked and moved up to the net. I missed a TON of easy sitter volleys and missed EVERY. SINGLE. OVERHEAD!!!!

    I rarely miss overheads when I am playing doubles. I had no idea what was going on.

    By some miracle, I managed to make enough volleys to get up 5 to 3 in the second set.

    Then I lost it all again. I started hitting everything long. I lost 3 games in quick succession.

    Here is how the last game went. Nice service return, then hit a high looper to his backhand, easy overhead, long.

    Nice service return, high loopper, easy overhead, long.

    Nice service return, missed backhand wide.

    Nice service return, high looper, easy overhead, long.

    I am an idiot. May be I should just go back to doubles...
     
    #74
  25. g4driver

    g4driver Hall of Fame

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    Don't give up singles - you adjusted from the first set to go up 5-3 in the second, so you did something right in that second set. You were close - he was a lefty and you were probably a little out of your zone, since it was your first singles match.

    Keep playing singles and you improve. It is a transition from doubles to singles and singles to doubles, but the transition you are going through is tougher than my route from singles to doubles. You see a lot of former singles guy switch to doubles, but you are going from having a partner and a wider court to one that is 9' narrower and no one to talk to about what is happening, so talk to yourself out there.

    Winning Ugly - read it two or three times. It will help.
     
    #75
  26. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Oh, Gameboy. That sounds so frustrating. It also sounds really familiar.

    My guess is that your groundstrokes were going long and wide because you were not setting up on the ball. If you don't get the proper distance from the ball, your ball will go long a lot.

    Why don't we doubles players get the proper distance from the ball? Because we aren't used to covering all that court. So we get there late. It sounds like that was the problem because you were trying to hit inside-out FHs, and spacing is key on that shot.

    Ask yourself: How many times did I actually get to the ball early and have time to do a bunch of adjustment steps and plan exactly what I was going to do with that ball?

    Regarding the missed volleys . . . oooh, that is annoying when you are a doubles player. What might be happening is that you have your put-away opportunity and you are focused more on putting it away than setting up and hitting a good shot. In other words, in doubles you have a partner to back you up if that volley or smash comes back. In singles, there is a lot of pressure to finish things, so that can lead to rushing and overhitting. If your overheads were going long, that suggests you probably were not backing up enough and then transferring your weight forward into the ball.

    I hope you will stick with it. My own venture into singles was unsuccessful, but it helped my doubles a lot because my footwork and groundstrokes improved.
     
    #76
  27. Fintft

    Fintft Hall of Fame

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    You are probably getting tense, something that happens to me as well, but only on the BH site, so I ended up counting my winners from that side, starting with at least...one per match!

    You may want to:
    a) Make sure that you are watching the ball properly and keeping your eyes at the point of contact throughout the contact.

    This also helps me
    Relax
    Hit harder

    b) Make sure that you got proper take back, turning your back towards the court and swing on the 1HBH + bending knees etc.
    c) Treat some of your matches as practice, trying to improve your shots.
    d) Have confidence like Djokovic, that your hard, penetrating shots will push your opponent back.

    GL!
     
    #77
  28. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    Fintft,

    You are absolutely correct, there is way too much tension in my swing during a match.

    I was playing some pickup doubles yesterday and noticed that I was still flying some groundstrokes. I couldn't believe how much tension was in my arms. I focused on keeping the arm loose and starting hitting normal again. And I didn't miss a single overhead... sigh.

    Cindy, my movements were okay on Friday. I got to most of the balls with plenty of time to spare, but my swing was late any way. I believe this is all because I was way too tense and couldn't swing freely.

    I think the tips here are very very good. I am just not sure how I can force myself to follow them during the match. I know I just need to relax, but it is impossible for me to do it during a match. I do just fine during practice.
     
    #78
  29. Fintft

    Fintft Hall of Fame

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    Well, like the inner game of tennis says, make sure you are not thinking about your technique as you hit the shots during matches: that's why you should take your mind off (have it only observe) and look at the striations on the ball etc. Your mind should trust your body to learn by feeling and so forth.

    When I make sure that I look at the striations on the ball, surprisingly I don't swing late....And I relax, etc. Some people try to read the writing on the ball, some other people use other exercises such as saying "hit" and "bounce" (whenever they hit the ball or the ball bounces off the court) to achieve the same goal...
     
    #79
  30. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Maybe. But what is the solution?

    I'm guessing you aren't putting your racket back immediately and are instead running . . . well, just running. Then you get there in plenty of time because you are awesome, but you then have to prepare. That takes time, so you either have to rush your preparation or your swing is late.

    The instant you see where the ball is going (FH or BH), **take your racket back.**

    When I find myself feeling rushed or tight, taking the racket back immediately helps me a lot.
     
    #80
  31. Fintft

    Fintft Hall of Fame

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    ^^^ Like the first tip Nick Bolletierri had for recreational players. And there isn't such a thing as too early a preparation...
     
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  32. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    I will try that Cindy. I definitely have to figure out something that will work...

    At least I won the doubles match tonight.
     
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  33. nextNalbandian

    nextNalbandian Rookie

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    I've had some of the same problems and for me it was all about whether or not I'm keeping my body moving forward into the court. In doubles I'm forced to do this bc the goal is to get forward and in singles I'm much more likely to take the ball with my weight on my back foot. When I start to struggle in singles I try to move forward more like I do in doubles. Hope this helps!
     
    #83
  34. Cnote

    Cnote Rookie

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    Like you, I got back into singles this past year. I incurred a significant ankle injury 4 years ago and had to take a year off while I rehabbed. When I returned to tennis I was only able to play doubles as I couldn't move the same as before. I have been able able to play competitively at the 4.0 level in doubles but really missed singles. I tried the 3.5 singles league this past fall and had my you know what handed to me on a silver platter the first few matches. After playing more and more, I came into my comfort level which you will too. The biggest problems was, as most have stated, preparation. I'm sure you have good strokes, but there is a whole other level of preparing for the ball compared to doubles.
    The mentality is different too. I'm a fairly good server, and with doubles I'm usually able to set up my doubles partner to poach effectively. Yet one of the the guys I played in singles expressed to me that his serve tactic is to get the ball in and start the rally. As simple as this sounds it blew my mind! Once I adopted the same thinking, I became more relaxed and found myself rallying until I found an opening or weakness to exploit. My matches became more competitive and I really enjoyed playing the game again. I plan to continue playing doubles and singles this year knowing that the mindset will have to be adjusted based on that extra person being on my side of the court!
    Also, I believe you need to really understand the hitting angles in the singles the same way as you do in doubles. Meaning, what are the possible shots/angles my opponent can hit and I how do I bisect the angle?
     
    #84
  35. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    Played in my club championship. I signed up for the A level (4.0) since I wanted to play some new people.

    The first match did not go too well. I knew the opponent pretty well, benchmark 4.0, a grinder who moves well and is very consistent. Not a good match for me.

    Making things worse, my serves were terrible again. Double faulted half of my points away. When I got into the rally, I did pretty well and won my share of points, but not being able to win any of my service games really hurt. I did not win a service game till the second set and lost 1 and 2.

    The consolation match was today and I got to the courts 30 min early just to work on my serves. That seems to have done the trick as I served well early on and held my serves against another benchmark 4.0 player.

    I reminded myself to hit relaxed and dialed down my effort to 60-70% level. He was having problems with my heavy topspin shots and I was able to force a lot of errors.

    I ended up losing the set 5-7 as I dumped a floating overhead into the net. I probably could have won if my service returns were better. I just could not get used to his heavy slice serves as they were dipping a bit more than what I was expecting.

    In the second set, he changed his tactics as he sliced off my heavy topspin. I had a lot of problems with these short balls. Either I dumped it into the net or hit a mediocre approach and he hit sharp angle passing shots by me.

    Towards the end, I started double faulting again and lost 2-6.

    Not a great finish, but I felt a lot better about my game. These are solid 4.0 players from a team that went to the nationals. I was able to play my game and dictated points in most cases. I just made too many errors, especially on serves and service returns. I also need to put away short balls. That is probably the biggest difference between my game and theirs. They can put away short balls.

    I am planning to take some lessons and see if I can get my game in shape more.
     
    #85
  36. BMcFarlan

    BMcFarlan New User

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    I think this is spot on. As a former teaching pro I've seen so many people get out in practice and pound the ball as hard as they can and think that will translate into a match. While it's valuable practice, the moment the person hitting with you is trying to beat you everything changes. Getting some time with a pro or even an advanced player to watch you hit will work wonders. Chances are it will break your heart initially when you get the feedback, but it will point you in the right direction.

    If I can give any advice from what you posted - you mentioned you "feel like you're swinging hard" or something to that effect. Swinging hard means nothing. Look at Federer's arms, there's no power there. I'm willing to bet that if you are losing depth and power but feel like you're swinging harder your moving backwards and not committing your front foot into your shot. Assuming you weigh more than 150lbs there's no possible way swinging your heart out will generate half of the depth and power you could get by simply improving your footwork and putting your body into your shots by shifting your weight and stepping into the ball, even just slightly.

    Step in, swing slower, and learn to live with your extra depth. Good luck.
     
    #86

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