What do all of you do for a living??

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by Gonzalez_Forehand, Jul 23, 2004.

  1. Gonzalez_Forehand

    Gonzalez_Forehand New User

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    Those of you who are in employment, what jobs do you all do? Do you like your job? And if you could go back and choose a career again, what would you choose (ie, within reason!)

    I am 20 years old and have no idea of what the hell I am going to do - just spent two weeks at a corporate law firm and realized that it absolutely sucks and I wouldn't last long as one of those guys.

    I need some ideas fast, this is really scarring the hell out of me now !
     
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  2. Phil

    Phil Hall of Fame

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    I notice that you're in London, England. Well, I think that given your circumstances and where you live the ideal career awaits you in the food services industry.

    You, young chap...can do very well providing friendly and non-confrontational service to a hungry and impatient populace. McDonald's is ALWAYS hiring and, you can be proud, once hired, that you TOO will be IN EMPLOYMENT. Burger King, Wendy's and many other companies WANT to offer you the opportunity to become part of a team in a growing multi-national quick service restaurant chain. Oh, your friends, and even relatives, may snicker at you and make jokes about "flipping burgers", but you will know in your heart that you are providing a much-needed service to the community and are, in all likelihood, on the management fast track. And, if working for a multi-national doesn't suit you, there's always the local version, slinging eel and kidney pies or bangers and mash. Good luck and cheerio, young chap.
     
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  3. Gonzalez_Forehand

    Gonzalez_Forehand New User

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    LOL, yeah, thats probably what it'll end up coming to!

    Do you flip burgers for a living? No wait a minute, you're a manager at McD's, right? You make flipping reconstituted moosebladder sound like a civic duty!
     
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  4. fantom

    fantom Hall of Fame

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    All kidding aside, I was in the same position as you (G_F) when I was in my early twenties. When I chose Electrical Engineering as my major, I still wasn't sure that was what I wanted to do the rest of my life. While in school, however, I found that the subject matter of Electrical Engineering was very interesting. I just stuck with it, and 8 years later I'm still doing it. The only regret that I have is that my (usually) long hours takes away from my tennis game. That may have something to do with the wife and kid at home too...........:)
     
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  5. Gonzalez_Forehand

    Gonzalez_Forehand New User

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    I'm glad that turned out well for you fantom, it's good to hear someone actually likes (or at least doesn't hate) their job.

    I basically chose to study law because I had no particular talent for anything and any hardworking moron can succeed in law - all you need to do is put in hours. The jobs I was interested in as a kid required skills that I did not have (maths, physics, mechanics - was alsway crap at them).

    So I figured, while I thought up something I am actually interested in doing (and can do), I'd get a respectable degree. 6 years later, I'm still thinking. I just finished two weeks work experience with a law firm and those guys just get murdered. Their work is their life and they rarely see daylight. They earn a huge salary - but if all you ever do is work like a machine, what does a few extra 0s on your balance sheet mean?

    The only way those guys survive is by enjoying what they do. They are genuinely interested in corporate insolvency and securitisation. Unfortunately, it bores hell out of me - hence the need for inspiration.

    Now I'm gonna get a pan and flip some burgers :wink:
     
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  6. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    I work in the Mental Health Field with adolescents that have severe emotional difficulties. It is a residential treatment center for males between the ages of 13-18.

    If I had to do it over again; I would choose the same field. I LOVE GOING TO WORK EVERYDAY!
     
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  7. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    It's obvious that he can't get a job in McDonalds!!

    Those jobs in London are for all the Illegal Immigrants. Trying to order a Big Mac is like a UN Conference, which is not good at all.

    I know what you mean about the solitors though, I went there for Work Experience and it is so boring.

    Good luck,

    -Liam
     
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  8. Gonzalez_Forehand

    Gonzalez_Forehand New User

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    LOL, yeah, McDonald's will take one look at my CV:

    "What, no criminal record? No expulsion from multiple highschools? This kid's overqualified for us!"

    Hey Liam - do you find it difficult to get (decent) practice partners in the UK? Down here in London good players are virtually impossible to come across; my friend is a solid player, but he's a pusher and he's lazy and won't play regularly.

    I find myself having to pay a coach large hourly rates just to get a decent hit :x !

    BTW, d'you consider yourself to have a NTRP-rating? I saw their webiste, and it's a little vague. I'd probably put myself at about 4.5, but I might get on court with a 4.5 and get wasted...
     
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  9. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    Gonzalez_Forehand,

    Yeah I do find it very difficult to find playing partners, I just enter tournamnets in the Midlands to get practise though I would like someone to hit with consistently.

    As for the ranking, I am a UK 3.2 which is loosly based on the NTRP and that is equal to around 5.5

    -Liam
     
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  10. Gonzalez_Forehand

    Gonzalez_Forehand New User

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    wow, cool, you'd give my @ss an emphatic whooping.

    D'you get into tournaments via your club? I'd be well up for some tournament play if I could hit more often and develop some consistency. Oh, and a backhand :)
     
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  11. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    lol, my backhand is my best shot. What racket do you use?

    To get into tournaments I just got a LTA membership and started with the 10.1 rating and just looked at what events were happening in my area. I emailed the person in charge and they send me entry forms and just fill 'em in and you get to play tournamnets with people of similar standards.

    Once you win some matches then they move your rating down. I am playing in a ITF junior event in October though which should be funny to watch!

    -Liam
     
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  12. david aames

    david aames Professional

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    You're mistaken. Phil is running a Yoshinoya franchise.

    http://www.yoshinoya.com/

     
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  13. david aames

    david aames Professional

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    It's easy to imagine you repeating them all day -- 'I'm telling you! It's a PS 6 with a paintjob.'

     
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  14. Morpheus

    Morpheus Professional

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    I'm CEO of a Fortune 500 company. Can't tell you which one, but if you put your arms over your head and spell the word "image" and then say the word "lightbulb" you might have a strong clue.
     
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  15. dennis1188

    dennis1188 Semi-Pro

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    I'm a Director, for a international consulting company. Lots of long hours and over the years many 6-7 day work weeks. But it has been a great life with very interesting projects and opportunity to travel and see much of the world. Tennis has been a consistent element, a 'reasonable' tennis game ( I play approx. 2 times per week) allows me entry at private clubs and meeting friends .
    BTW, In my 20's, I tried working in alot of different jobs and learned how to adapt to people and changing environments.
    A useful basic approach to business and tennis is; i) opportunity and positioning (are you in a 'target rich' environment ?) ii) analysis (have the right choice of skills/weapons to do the job) iii) execution (closing out the point and winning the goal).
    This is a big, wonderful and exciting world . Good Luck.
     
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  16. Gonzalez_Forehand

    Gonzalez_Forehand New User

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    Liam, I use a Babolat PC Team+ (no prizes for guessing on which Chilean psycho I base myself!), although I recently found a great racquet store in London which allows demos. I'll probably flirt with a good few and see if any suit my game better than the PC.

    I've been recommended the Babolat PD, the PC Zylon360, and the Fischer Pro Extreme FT by various people. It's £10 per demo, so I can't really go for the scattergun-demo-anything apprach, but I'll have a dance with four or five before I make a choice - it's not urgent, I'm actually quite happy with the PC, although a bit more power might go down well.

    What are you packing in your raquet bag? (and let me guess - you have a single-handed BH, right? Everyone I know whose best shot is BH has a single-hander - I mean, non pros).



    Anyway, I'm glad to see some job satisfaction among you guys! I've heard horror-stories of the 7-day working weeks from various people in corporate law... That's kinda what I'm looking to avoid, unless I train with a law firm (likely) and genuinely like it (unlikely). In NY, corporate lawyers get 2 weeks holiday per year, and each employee is thoroughly expected to waive it!! :shock: EVERY YEAR!! [/quote]
     
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  17. Phil

    Phil Hall of Fame

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    David - I quit that gig. Once Japan banned American beef imports (due to a SINGLE mad cow) I just lost my will to serve "gyu-don".

    Hey, Liam, how did they allow you to intern in a SOLICITOR'S office when you can't even SPELL the word? Must have been a lot of toilets to clean there...
     
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  18. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    Phil,

    I went there beacuse my Unlce runs the firm of Solicitors, lol I made a typing error! so what? remember the time that you spelt Venezuela wrong!? :lol: hehehe.

    Gonzalez_Forehand,

    No I have a 2 handed Backhand and it is definelty my best shot, if you want to know a Pro with a 2 hander better than there forehand then look no further than Thomas Johansson, his 2 hander is awesome and Safin has a better BH than FH imo.

    I want to demo but I can't as there are no shops in the Midlands who do it, and the mail order ones seem a bit dodgy. But let me know how you get on with the Pro Extreme.

    -Liam
     
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  19. Phil

    Phil Hall of Fame

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    You really had to go back to find that post, Liam. I'm flattered that you bookmark MY posts. You SHOULD-you may learn something.

    Anyway, mine is a typo as anyone can see and yours, well, you just don't know how to spell-but not surprising since you ARE a self-admitted high school failure. High school is not so hard-and I wasn't all that much of a student, but only the real losers actually FAILED it.
     
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  20. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    I am a Phil basher.
     
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  21. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    Phil,

    I didn't have to go back that far, it's just about 30 posts down from this one. What do I learn about your posts anyway?

    All I seem to learn is that you like picking on little kids, you like Japanese women, you know very little about Football (soccer) and can't spell names of various South American Countries!!

    It's upsetting to see grown man act in this way Phil. Anyway you can't really fail high school.

    -Liam
     
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  22. Gonzalez_Forehand

    Gonzalez_Forehand New User

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    No problems Liam, I'll let you know how the Fischer plays when I finally get round to demo-ing it. Unfortunately, that won't be for a while, as I fractured my foot last Tuesday playing football (soccer!) and won't be able to get back on court for the next four weeks.

    And now we get some nice weather...

    (scans the post for typos hoping to avoid castigation :wink: )
     
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  23. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    You don't need to check yours Gonzalez_Forehand, he only checks mine for them.

    It's a pleasure trading insults with you Phil! :D

    Liam V Phil Part 89645708589545765673 I suppose

    -Liam
     
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  24. Phil

    Phil Hall of Fame

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    I know all I need to know about soccer-it's euthanasia for the masses. Do you know what that means, Liam-euthanasia? I never wrote anywhere that I like Japanese women...but I do...and French, and Spanish and Italian, Scandinavian, Russian, Czech, Thai, Korean, Australian, etc., etc. Is that a problem for you?
     
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  25. Aonex

    Aonex Semi-Pro

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    Phil, I thought you didn't like the horsey faces?
     
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  26. thejerk

    thejerk Semi-Pro

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    i like women too, as a matter of fact caliente is my favorite show and i'm a photographer
     
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  27. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    Of course I know what euthanasia is. And you said that you tried to learn about football so you had something to talk to Japanese women about!! Then as Aonex said, you mentioned that they had "horsey faces". Now your saying you like them?

    You seem to change your mind more than a women, or maybe you are a woman? called Phyllis!!

    It's all coming out now Phyllis!

    Are you loosing your memory in your older age Grandad or is it Grandma? :lol:

    -Liam
     
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  28. Aonex

    Aonex Semi-Pro

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    Oh, that was referring to Eastern European women. Phil thinks they're horsey faces.
     
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  29. tennisnj

    tennisnj Professional

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    My favorite quote upon completing my undergraduate work was "I'm glad I got an archaeology degree so I could teach tennis." & that's right, I have my BA & not once have I ever used it while teaching tennis. Tennis instruction is my night, weekend, & summer job, currently I'm a Middle School Special Education teacher & the H.S's girls (fall) & boys (Spring) tennis coach...
     
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  30. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    I am a retired RN. It's a great field, and ALWAYS in demand. I retired due to having a transplant myself. I don't know what the market is like in Europe, but in the US, there is a projected half million nurse shortage in the next 5 years. Is that good? Well, if you're an RN it is. My wife is also an RN. She's been an RN for 22 years now, and still loves it. Advantages: 1) you can make a difference in someone's life every day you work. 2) you can live virtually anywhere. Almost every city or town has a hospital. 3) you can move around as much as you want. I've moved from Tulsa, OK to Farmington, NM to Fresno, CA to Sacramento to Charlottesville, VA to Richmond, VA, and never paid for a move. Some nurses work as TravelNurses. They take 13 to 26 week assignments. They normally get their housing paid. They can choose their assignments, stay as many periods as they want, and get great pay 4) very good pay. Maybe not as much as the CEO, but still, nurses START at $50-70,000 in most cities. Inner city LA or NY may be more, plus they usually pay a $5-10,000 signing bonus (1 year contract). With the oncoming shortage, I'd say salaries will go up. 5) Scheduling--many places offer self-scheduling. When I was at UCD in Sacramento, my wife and I took 7 or 8 days in a row off EVERY month without using vacation. We worked 3 12-hr shifts. We'd work the first 3 one week and the last 3 the next week. 6) Men do very well in nursing. Most men are very good, or very bad--not much in between. If good, you're in high demand. Afterall, there is a lot of physical work in nursing. Need any more reasons? Let me know.
     
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  31. Gonzalez_Forehand

    Gonzalez_Forehand New User

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    Thanks for the info, Steve, all I can say to that is "How do I get a Green Card?!"

    Nurses, although still in shortage in the UK, are treated notoriously badly - our National Health Service is an inefficient mess and it's the workers who pay the price.

    My mother works reception at a medical centre and tells me that both doctors and nurses are overrun, and while doctors' salaries are high, nurses get the sh*t end of the stick.

    Damn it I should have been born in the US! It's funny how most - if not all - of you guys in the US are/were very happy with your jobs, while everyone I talk to in England whinges and bitches about their job/life!! This country is depressing!
     
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  32. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    Yeah everyone goes mad about there jobs here, but it seems that most Americans are happy with there's. Which I think is really good, you have a job so you may aswell enjoy it.

    And Gonzalez_Forehand, if you were born in America you would get a job you liked and cheaper tennis stuff!!! The prices here are about double the prices that you guys have to pay!

    -Liam
     
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  33. Gonzalez_Forehand

    Gonzalez_Forehand New User

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    Tell me about it! Prices here are crazy, choice is awful - I only know of two shops in the whole of London who stock players' racquets.

    And clothing as well - the current Nike range is not available anywhere in London (not even Niketown!), and you can't even order them off TW, as Nike have a ban on international shipping of their products :x

    I was lucky enough to get hold of my Babolat PC team+ for £75 though, which I thought was quite impressive for London rates.

    Accessibility to tennis facilities is similarly bad down here (don't suppose it's any better in the Midlands?) - I have to travel for 1.5hours just to get to some indoor courts, for which one pays up to £19 per hour! Luckily, they're kind to students, so it's £8 off peak, and £12 peak for me. Still kills my student loan though.

    And they wonder why Henman has no apparent successor...
     
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  34. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    I have to go 90 minutes to get to a decent club and that doesn't even have any good people of my age.

    I'm not a member of a club, I just play tournaments and I find it really difficult to find people to play with. No juniors around here. It's really difficult for kids who want to play tennis in England.

    Everything is against us really, the attitude towards juniors at clubs is really poor and everything is so expensive. Aswell as travelling 90 minutes to find a decent club! Not good at all.

    -Liam
     
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  35. Gonzalez_Forehand

    Gonzalez_Forehand New User

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    Yeah, sounds just like London. I used to be a member of a local club, but the seniors always had priority - and the "coaching" was a joke. They'd just say "this is how to hit a forehand" and make you hit the most rudimentary flat frying-pan eastern nothing-shot - I developed a western FH entirely independent of any instructor. Since then, my FH has become my biggest weapon by a long, long way.

    I spent the last year living in Paris as part of my uni course, and I can tell you, the facilities there are superb. There are courts everywhere, and they are cheap, and priority is given to kids - kids get Wednesdays off school just to develop their sports skills - it's like "sports day" once a week! And the coaches actually know what they're talking about - they get their kids rallying consistently from the back of the court, and the western topspin FH is the bread-and-butter shot - it's what they all learn first. No frying-pan nonsense.

    How old are you, Liam?
     
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  36. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    I'm 17 and the facilities in Spain are also very good, I played in Spain for 2 years and your correct in saying that other countries know what they are on about. They train you really hard and i'm sure that's what helped even though I have never had a lesson in my life of 14 of playing. They focus on fitness there.

    -Liam
     
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  37. Coda

    Coda Semi-Pro

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    this is why Great Britain sucks (no offense) when it comes to getting pros to do any good on the tour...just to rub it in I only have to drive 10 minutes to play quality matches lol.
     
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  38. David Pavlich

    David Pavlich Professional

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    Steve: RN?! My wife's a RN...but she left the "bedside" thing years ago. She's a research nurse, more specifically, she's a monitor for a CRO (lead CRA) that's in the midst of a trial for congestive heart failure in African/Americans.

    Yea, you right! Becoming a RN is a great career and will be in demand until diseases are cured like it's done on Star Trek!

    And to answer the initial question, I own a tennis shop.

    David
     
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  39. Coda

    Coda Semi-Pro

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    ahh David has a great job! David, do you find yourself torn between trying to sell technology filled rackets and trying not to rip off your customers?
     
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  40. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    Why should he? Technology isn't all bad. There are rackets, new and old, made for certain types of players. A shop owner's best asset is his ability to match those things up.
     
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  41. PHSTennis

    PHSTennis Semi-Pro

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    I string tennis racquets..
     
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  42. Gonzalez_Forehand

    Gonzalez_Forehand New User

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    Owning a tennis shop sounds cool! But it'd have to be in the US because hardly anyone playes tennis here for 50 weeks in the year. And for the Wimbledon fortnight, the nation goes tennis-mad, and then it disappears off the map for the next 50 weeks. It so sucks.

    Hey Liam, you weren't at Sanchez-Casal were you? I'd have loved to go there when I was a kid. I'd still love to go there now, but I'd only ever get there in a toilet-cleaning capacity!

    I think it's clear that the US is certainly the place to live if you want to enjoy tennis for more than two weeks every year. I am quite jealous of all the facilities you guys have at your disposal! I could probably move the the US in a few years, but that means I'd need corporate sponsorship and that means being a lawyer (yuk). And therefore never seeing daylight.
     
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  43. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    I haven't even heard of Sanchez-Casal :oops: , I went to Equelite in Valencia though which is run by Ferrero and I was lucky enough to meet him a couple of times. He's a Top bloke.

    -Liam
     
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  44. norcal

    norcal Hall of Fame

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    Phil wrote:
    I'm not Liam but I'll take a guess: Little kids in China?
     
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  45. David Pavlich

    David Pavlich Professional

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    It is fun. I'm a people person and truly enjoy the contact. I've made some wonderful acquaintances and a couple of new friends. I played more tennis BEFORE I owned a shop, but as any small business owner will tell you, it's a lot of hours.

    As far as the technology thing, it's unavoidable. As new stuff hits the market, there is a demand. People are curious and because I am fortunate to live in a small but quite wealthy area of the country, there are a lot of people with disposable income. I could be a stalwart and stock POG's (I do stock the POG MP) and Wilson Pete Sampras racquets, but this is a very small fraction of the buying public and truthfully, I'd already be out of business.

    The vast majority of my customers are 2.5 to 4.0 in men and women. Most of these people aren't interested in playing with anything more than 11 ounces with most looking for frames less than 11 oz.

    My business will be 2 years old on 29 July, so it's still in its infancy. I can't afford to stock "old" technology when the demand is for the new stuff. As soon as frames hit Tennis Magazine or something looks different in the hands of a pro on the tour, I get phone calls...but the calls aren't for TiRadicals or TT Graphites. My calls are for NXGs, Liquid Metal, PDs (after every slam), nCodes and so on.

    All I can do is describe the technology and the theories behind the technology, let the customer demo and decide. At times, I'm asked what I play with, what string and so on. I think I disappoint them when I tell them it's either a POG OS or a DB800, both strung with Prince Syn w/duraflex 18 gauge...nothing exotic.

    I do my best not to prejudice anyone as far as brand go, even though I play with Prince. I don't have the time to demo everything myself, although I don't know how much faith I'd put in a 52 year old hacker, so I can't tell people what many of the frames are like other than the reactions I've received from other demoees (is that a word?). Many customers do a lot of research, which helps in cutting down the number of frames they wish to demo. However, research only goes so far and what it's done for me is to allow me to show the customer that I have done my homework by answering questions that may not have been answered in their research.

    The long and short of it is, no, I don't feel any angst about the new technology. People like it and demand it. Look at what it's done for the automobile. A Z06 Corvette can do o-60 in 4.1 seconds, yet it is capable of 25 mpg (if you can keep your foot out of it). The badest 'Vette of the late 60's and early 70's couldn't come close and got about 12 mpg.

    Truth be known, I think it does nothing but help the tennis playing public. It wasn't that many years ago that a 60 year old lady that couldn't bench press 30 lbs had to swing a 12.5 ounce woodie. Now, this same lady can go out and actually give the ball a ride, and that's a good thing.

    My apologies for becoming long winded.

    David
     
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  46. Coda

    Coda Semi-Pro

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    I've never thought that you can't really afford to just stock old rackets...thanks for the insight.
     
    #46
  47. Phil

    Phil Hall of Fame

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    Norcal wrote:
    Oh, a wise guy, eh;-)

    David - Good post. I would have responded to the "rip-off" question with less, ahh...diplomatic tact. Some people need to learn what it's like to actually own a business and deal with things like OVERHEAD. Your post is a pretty solid overview of that process.
     
    #47
  48. Coda

    Coda Semi-Pro

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    sorry Phil, I just don't have all the life experience you have...I'm only 17 so I have some time to learn these things and become tactless like you.
     
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  49. Phil

    Phil Hall of Fame

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    You have time, Coda, but that doesn't mean you WILL. Maybe, if you're lucky...
     
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  50. Coda

    Coda Semi-Pro

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    why would I want to become like you? I'm not that stupid of a person to aspire to such great heights.
     
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