What do you do when you see that S rating?

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by floridatennisdude, Sep 10, 2013.

  1. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    Combo league, you see the 19 year old former top junior in the area (nationally top 300 ish) mysteriously show up as a self rate 4.0 two weeks prior to the first match?

    Do you...
    1- advise the opposing captain you're on to the trick?
    2- blind report it to the coordinator before first match?
    3- wait to see if he plays against you to file grievance?
    4- let the cheaters get away with it?

    I know some here are over the top, looking for the more seasoned captains take on their experience. I've already chosen one of the above options, but considered all approaches mentioned.
     
    #1
  2. OrangePower

    OrangePower Hall of Fame

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    I would go for #3.

    Reason: I'd want to make absolutely sure that this player and the former top junior are one and the same, and not just someone else with the same name. Also, even if it is for sure the junior who self-rated and signed up, I would at least want to give him (and the captain) the opportunity to come to his senses and de-roster before playing any matches.

    Once his identity has been verified and he has proven his dishonesty by playing a match, then go ahead and file a grievance.
     
    #2
  3. coyote

    coyote Rookie

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    I would wait until he plays several matches and then file the grievance. Presuming it is the same person.
     
    #3
  4. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    I thought someone of that caliber absolutely must self rate at 4.5? Top junior is the same as going to a D2 or D3 college in my book.
     
    #4
  5. J_R_B

    J_R_B Hall of Fame

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    If they have or have had a junior sectional ranking in 18s, they have to self-rate at 5.0.
     
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  6. tennis_tater

    tennis_tater Semi-Pro

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    I didn't realize they had modified the player experience chart. 5.0 for a kid who had a sectional ranking is pretty steep if you ask me. Guess they are trying to help cities create a 5.0 plus league.

    And now they have a provision for college kids who play On Campus. What happens if a kid is a member of a college squad that made it to nationals, but he played on the B or C team. Does he still have to rate as a 5.0 even though he may actually be a 3.0?
     
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  7. J_R_B

    J_R_B Hall of Fame

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    Depends on the section. They set the bar high, but each section should know the relative strength of the kids playing junior tournaments in their section and grant appeals to play lower than 5.0 if warranted. In Middle States, probably the top 40-50 or so in 18s are all legit 5.0+ players. After 50, you have to look at the individual records. A lot of kids below 50 could reasonably play 4.5 (some do), but some are 5.0+ but just don't play enough tournaments to get a high ranking.
     
    #7
  8. SwankPeRFection

    SwankPeRFection Hall of Fame

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    Regardless of what they play, I always gauge the S ranking after I see them play. If they suck, they're obviously not that high and if they're better or appear to be Bogarting a match/points to make them seem lower ranked, then I call on their BS. It's pretty easy to see when players are better than their S ranking leads them to be because the better players will all of a sudden pull something out of the ordinary from their *** to turn a game/point/match around if needed. Be weary of S ranked players who hold serve reliably and don't break until it's needed to win a set. Very few will win a set outright by holding and breaking each and every game. Most will either keep pace and make it seem competitive or appear to be losing and then all of a sudden reel it all back in and win it. When this second part comes fairly easily, something is wrong.
     
    #8

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