What do you think of his explanation to wrist movement ?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by isilra, Feb 22, 2013.

  1. isilra

    isilra Rookie

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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TrKHZzetpc

    He suggests using wrist snap consciously and practice it. For a newbie, it's kind of hard to get this snapping effect naturally. You think this is a good way to get used to a loose wrist and racquet lag ?
     
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  2. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    Last edited: Feb 22, 2013
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  3. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    It's not just coaches, it is even the pros that have a hard time explaining what is really going on.

    I guess the most important thing would be to learn the motion.

    But the words often get in the way, rather than helping.


    So it is clear that Coach Kyril is confusing you, because even though he says "wrist snap"what is really happening is he is keeping his wrist relatively still, pushing the butt of the racquet at the ball with the racquet behind him as he uncoils, then rapdly internally roating his upper arm to bring the racquet through the hitting zone in almost a slap like action.
    To him, it "feels" like he is using "wrist snap".


    But I'll bet my more anatomically correct explanation above only confused you more.


    So how about "forgetting" both the "wrist snap" and "internal shoulder rotation" I provide and instead watch a fairly clear demonstation of how to hit the forehand that I'll bet you find a lot less confusing:

    How to hit a Modern Tennis Forehand in HD / Instructional
    lockandrolltennis
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMNtq393tvo

    (Notice how cleverly he doesn't mention any particulars about how the wrist or arm moves - instead he emphasizes how the the arm motion occurs as a result of the rapid rotation of the hips - mimic his instruction and you'll have the right motion.)
     
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  4. isilra

    isilra Rookie

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    Lock and roll guy makes it explained perfectly but as i said, it might be hard for a beginner to get in a proper position, get in an open stance, take the swing, turn your hips and the most important, stay loose and not tend to arm the ball when you do these all. What Kyril do is he creates the motion not with the whole body coiling/uncoiling but just with sudden direction change of his arm, maybe we can call it arm coiling/uncoiling. I think that his wrist motion can be easily created by moving your arm back first and than move it towards forward rapidly and just keeping your arm and wrist loose, not whole the body so it can be created without a full body coil because i know i do it sometimes. Both doesn't use a wrist snap if a wrist snap means active usage of wrist/forearm muscles. I wonder if this is the explanation, Kyril's technique can be count as a valid technique at least for an improver or just saving the day.

    I don't think it is a snap, also it is clear that he makes a forearm pronation to make the shot but you think he makes a forearm supination before the pronation ? I think he supinates his forearm back a little when taking the racquet back.
     
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  5. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    This is a "hot" topic now.

    But again, I think the move is initiated by the sudden, violent hip rotation that causes the hitting arm to lag and supinate - so that that "delay" leads to a late "speed up" in the forward arm motion and "pronation".

    Part of the "hot topic" aspect is how much muscle "pre-stretch" occurs, and how much extra power is provided from muscle that is pre-stretched. http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=441023
    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=436076&page=4

    (An example of pre-stretch is how we can jump higher if we rapidly bend our knees before a jump, rather than starting the jump from a position where we have our knees bent for more than a fraction of a second.)
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2013
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  6. isilra

    isilra Rookie

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    You made my day, a lot of stuff to read, lots of things to learn. I have always heard about pre-stretch thing but i have never known what was it about.

    I will read all but just curious, did you have a conclusion about how pre-stretch thing is used in professional tennis ? I mean do professional players use this mini back and forth movement ?
     
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  7. corners

    corners Legend

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    I agree with this, but part of the snap is even more passive. The racquet will snap almost on it's own as a consequence of the forearm slowing down. This happens in all sports where relatively heavy things are swung, like baseball and golf. As long as the wrist is relaxed the racquet will come around that wrist hinge on it's own. In other words, the racquet snaps the wrist, not the other way around. Of course the player loads the racquet with energy in the first place, but the source of the snap comes primarily from the the energy in the racquet. Loading the racquet with energy and then slowing down the forearm in the right sequence with the right timing is the trick, and that's what Kyril is teaching.

    (Although I find that doing that drill with the elbow held against the trunk can be hard on the shoulder for some reason. I'd be careful with overdoing that one.)
     
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  8. lendl1986

    lendl1986 Rookie

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    I've found that the wrist "snap" happens with no conscious effort when you simply grip the racquet so softly that it nearly falls out of your hand.
     
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