What does mean when a tournament is "open"

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by Oldracquet27, Jul 20, 2009.

  1. Oldracquet27

    Oldracquet27 Rookie

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    Can you please explain the difference between: "open" and when they group by ages (30,40.50) , and when they group by rating (3.0, 4.0 etc.)???

    Who normally plays in open tournaments and in the other ones??

    Thank You !

    I am new into tournaments.....
     
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  2. thejackal

    thejackal Hall of Fame

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    then dont play opens.


    opens are 4.5 or 5.0 (depending on the area) and above. in theory anyone can enter, but that usually just means the folks who are too good to play 4.5 or 5.0
     
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  3. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

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    For example the U.S. Open has qualifying spots, so a nobody can get into the main draw. You can probably find some local qualifying events, and if you win those you can go to NYC qualifying, so if you win enough you can wind up the U.S. Open champion and give up your day job! Or at least that's the legend as I heard it.
     
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  4. darrinbaker00

    darrinbaker00 Professional

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    Open tournaments are just that: open to all who are USTA members. For instance, we have a tournament here in Northern California, the Stead Open, that not only attracts players from the local colleges (Cal, Stanford, etc.), but also players with ATP and WTA ranking points.
     
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  5. NoSkillzAndy

    NoSkillzAndy Rookie

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    Open divisions usually feature players who are very good players. These can be college players, former college players, former pros, current pros, teaching pros, competitive juniors, random adults, etc. They are open to anyone to enter however, so the competition will vary drastically, though obviously tending towards the very high end.

    Then there are NTRP divisions. These are based on skill level. 2.5 being the lowest that usually has a division at tournaments. 5.0 being the highest. The idea behind entering these divisions is to play against other players that are more or less at your level of ability and talent so that every match is a competitive one that could go either way.

    Lastly, there are age divisions. This is pretty much the same idea as the NTRP skill levels, but is based off of age instead of skill. In these divisions you get to play against people that are similar age to you in the hope that you won't get blasted off the court by some young-gun hotshot, or if you're a young-gun hotshot that you won't have to play against some old geezer that can barely move. In these divisions, you have to be at least that age to play, so for a "Men's 30's" division you'd have to be 30 years old or more. A 50 year old could play in the 30's technically, but that would be pretty rare.

    In my experience, it's best for new players to stick with the NTRP divisions. Self-rate low and work your way up the NTRP levels. Skill is a much larger factor in tennis than age and if you start playing age divisions too soon you'll run into some players that will wipe the court with you. Trust me on that.
     
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  6. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    "Open tournaments", are open to everyone>>>> even beginners. Nuff said.
     
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  7. SretiCentV

    SretiCentV New User

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    I played in an open after only having played for about 4 months 1-2 per week.

    LOL that was a fun 40 minute double bagel
     
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  8. brosamj

    brosamj New User

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    That is pretty funny and kinda courageous. Just curious--did you not know what an Open tourney was?
     
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  9. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

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    Look at it this way, can you get a teaching pro to hit with you for just the price of an entrance fee? Normally, you can't get the really good players to play you. So you get creamed? It's not like this is boxing. It's just tennis.
     
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  10. SretiCentV

    SretiCentV New User

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    I had been told that it was open to all players and there might be some really good players there so my chances of winning were slim. I had actually hoped to get beat down and maintain my dignity :)

    My sentiments exactly. I will be playing the same open this year (15 months experience - still 3.5 :( ) with the hope of winning at least one game.
     
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  11. bluetrain4

    bluetrain4 Legend

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    "Open" tournaments are not, by any means, always filled with ex-college, 4.5 and above only players. Maybe in tennis "hotspots," but where I live, that's not the case.

    I play a lot of tournaments in Middle Illinois and the St. Louis area and the quality of the "open" division varies drastically. On the upper end are tournaments that many have described, where the lowest level of player (other than maybe one or two players) is 4.5, and most of the 4.5s lose by the second round.

    More common are tournaments that are "top heavy" that have 5.0s and above, ex-college players, etc. filling out the SFs and most of the QFs, with sometimes some 4.5s making it to the later rounds. At these tourneys, you'll see 4.0s (even the occasional 3.5) making it past the first round as there will inevitably be matchups of two lower-rated players.

    And, at the lower end, there are relatively "weak" tournaments where the 5.0+ ex-college/teaching pro players are few and are outnumbered by the 4.5s and lower.

    I'm a 36 year old, 4.5 player, so I always have a lot of options. Sometimes its fun to play the Open, either simply to play a great player, or because I think, given the tournament, that I might be able to win at least a round. On the flip side, 35s and 4.5 tournaments are great option if I actually want to go deep, but they can sometimes be really weak, most commonly when less-experienced players play the 35s or a lot 3.5s and 4.0s play "up" in the 4.5s because they want better competition, but not "open" level competition, or if (ugh) divisions get combined.
     
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  12. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    It is true that the best players hang out in Open tourneys. It is also true that not every single player will be top calibre. What is sure is that the winner of the event will e very good, so if you aren't, you aren't going to go very far in the draw.

    Let's say you are a 51 year old 4.0, your best chance of winning a tournament would be at 4.0, next at 50 years old and least at Open although technically you would qualify for all three.
     
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  13. Oldracquet27

    Oldracquet27 Rookie

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    Thank You for all the accurate responses

    This Forum Rocks.....
     
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  14. smack that

    smack that Semi-Pro

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    so whats a open level perosn?
     
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  15. PeppermintMocha

    PeppermintMocha Rookie

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    The last three local tournaments that I've been to, the seeds almost always make it to the QFs. If you're seeded in the open division that means you're very, very good.

    At where I live, the winner the open division of the biggest tournament also gets a wc to play the qualifying of the local challenger's event.
     
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  16. federer_15

    federer_15 Rookie

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    Anyone can play open, normally the better plays do
     
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  17. brad1730

    brad1730 Rookie

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    I have wondered how the seeds are determined. Does the USTA give the tournament organizers a peek at the dynamic ratings or a report using these ratings to prioritize the players -or- do they have to look up each player on Tennislink to evaluate their tournament performance?
     
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  18. rosenstar

    rosenstar Professional

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    the majority of the open level tournaments around me, (Baltimore/DC/Annapolis area) offer prize money. In one tournament I played, I got a double bagel my first round, lost in the second round to a top D3 player 3 and 3 or so. That player went on to lose to the eventual champion, who had a win over Andy Roddick in Roddick's early days. That was one of the smaller open tournaments nearby me (only semifinalists cashed). There's also a tournament at a local country club with a 10k purse, and a different tournament with a 40k purse. I cannot say I know of any open tournaments nearby without a cash prize.
     
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  19. rosenstar

    rosenstar Professional

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    I worked at a tennis shop and created a draw for an open tournament, we spend a lot of time researching points, rankings, college and professional records and head-to-head's. It's very complicated and somewhat subjective. If one player has an atp point, but another player is ranked top 3 in the nation for men's open singles, you have to choose who gets the higher seed.
     
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  20. bluetrain4

    bluetrain4 Legend

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    Yeah, even in Middle Illinois, we have prize money open tournaments (though the purses usually aren't that huge) and the draws tend to be top-to-bottom really good players.
     
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