what does "meat and potatoes" tennis mean??

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by wyutani, May 12, 2006.

  1. wyutani

    wyutani Hall of Fame

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    i heard agassi is using this tactic...what is it eh? :confused:
     
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  2. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Staying with your strengths, which for Agassi is taking the ball early, hitting deep, and making his opponent do alot more running that he does. It's about being consistent instead of going for flashy winners.
     
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  3. Ripper

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    Pusher? :p
     
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  4. thejackal

    thejackal Hall of Fame

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    Deep down the middle
     
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  5. ATXtennisaddict

    ATXtennisaddict Hall of Fame

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    Agassi is a pusher,yes.
     
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  6. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Taking the ball early and hitting to the corners and making your opponent run does not sound like a pusher to me. That's an aggressive baseliner playing under control and not going for too much too soon.
     
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  7. Dan007

    Dan007 Hall of Fame

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    What the hell are you talking about. Andre hits clean winners from both wings and punishes the ball.
     
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  8. Saito

    Saito Professional

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    He will not go for DTL shots unless it's a short ball, so he'll continue to play high percentage shots till he gets the short ball. That's usually when he'll finish the point or get passed if he's playing against higher tier players (i.e. Fed, Safin, and Nadal, or people who like to hit passing shots like Hewiit or Nalbandian)
     
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  9. LowProfile

    LowProfile Professional

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    He was kidding. I think.
     
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  10. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Hitting crosscourt, playing percentage tennis, and running your opponents to death.
     
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  11. FiveO

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    I agree...and to include high first serve and return percentages.
     
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  12. 35ft6

    35ft6 Legend

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    What BB and Five-O said. In general, it's a workmanlike, disciplined brand of high percentage tennis. The opposite of flashy, hot and cold, go for broke tennis. On a hot day, a player with big shots can hit a meat and potato game off the court, but the meat and potato player knows that in the long run, his game will prevail more than not (if he's Agassi, Davydenko, Norman, or Chang... people that sort of played that type of game).

    And it's interesting how Agassi started winning more when he stopped playing with so much "talent." The Agassi we know today is the ultimate meat and potato player, and as talented as he is, he didn't start winning until he learned to NOT implement all his talents, and limit his shot choices. Seems almost counterintuitive when you think about how people harp on Roddick for not developing MORE shots. Agassi had to do the opposite to become a legend.

    In the world of music, a meat and potato player is somebody who plays "in the pocket," as opposed to going off on strange improvisational tangents with crazy time and key changes.

    In basketball, a meat and potato team might be the Detroit Pistons, solid teamwork, blue collar work ethic -- tenacious defense, working hard for every rebound, fighting for each loose ball. The opposite of run and gun.

    And so on.
     
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