what does points of Head Light mean?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by ksnho, Mar 13, 2011.

  1. ksnho

    ksnho New User

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    Now I'm thinking about to buy new Raquet which is similiar to Prostaff 6.0 95sq original..

    But,
    I have a simple question for racquet balance,

    what does points of Head Light mean?

    for example, balance is more go to head the points is higher?

    I tested demo racquet for BLX six one 18x20 95sq,
    I felt balance is forward to head which is different from Prostaff 6.0 original...

    Thanks,,

    Kevin
     
    #1
  2. TennisNewb

    TennisNewb New User

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    Head light means that its heavier in the handle. Meaning you need a little more arm string to swing it quicker. Heavy heavy means more weight in the hoop requiring less strength to swing.
     
    #2
  3. ksnho

    ksnho New User

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    I know about that,, but my question is..

    I know that head light means,,but my question is,

    What is the difference between 7pt head light and
    2pt Head light?

    I carefully thought about the balance of 7 pt head light is to the head
    than the balance of 2 pt Head Light.

    Is that right ?

    Thank you!!

    Kevin
     
    #3
  4. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Each point of balance is 1/8" either toward the head or toward the handle from the racquet's measured mid point. A standard 27" racquet's mid point is at 13.5", so if that frame is 8 points HL, the balance point will be 12.5" from the end of the grip. If the same 27" racquet is 4 points head-heavy, its balance point will be 14.0" from the bottom of the grip.

    The closer the balance point is to your hand, the more maneuverable the racquet becomes and that can be especially desirable as racquets get heavier. Light racquets often have closer to either even or head-heavy balance so that more of their mass is concentrated out toward the hoop to augment stability and power.

    In your example, if the racquets both have the same weight, the frame with the balance of 7 pts. HL would most probably have more maneuverability. While that can be nice for let's say a 12 oz. frame, that balance could make a lighter 10.8 oz. racquet feel too light and twitchy. As you try different gear, it can be a big help to get familiar with what you prefer as far as a racquet's static weight, balance, and (in my opinion) its flex.
     
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  5. roundiesee

    roundiesee Hall of Fame

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    Brilliant answer! :)
     
    #5
  6. scotus

    scotus Legend

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    So don't be afraid of going 10 points headlight. It sounds like a lot, but not extreme at all.
     
    #6
  7. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Exactly.

    I enjoy using 12.8 oz. racquets, which are relatively heavy, but they also handle really well for me because they have 10-11 points HL balance. I even have heavier 13.4 oz. frames and those are almost as comfortable for me to maneuver because their balance is a point or two even more HL.
     
    #7
  8. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Thanks for the encouragement, amigo.
     
    #8
  9. chrisl

    chrisl New User

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    Nice&clear fuzz.

    I suspect you of having had physics training at some point in time.

    C.
     
    #9
  10. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    It was actually physics that got me flunked out of US Navy Nuclear Power School.

    The good news is that I'm a really big fan of irony!!!
     
    #10
  11. JT_2eighty

    JT_2eighty Hall of Fame

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    Not exactly. While head light Does mean heavier in handle; head light is going to be more maneuverable, but heavy racquets tend to be head light.

    Meanwhile, head heavy is less maneuverable, yet lighter racquets are typically head heavy... maybe this is why you say "requiring less strength to swing".

    But, take two 13 oz racquets, one that is 2 pts head light and one that is 10 pts head light: Guarantee you the 10 pt head light requires LESS strength to swing, even though static weight is same. Swingweight will also be lower, again, requiring less strength, being more "whippy" if you will.

    Add this to fuzz's comments, which are also spot on. Hopefully this gives a better idea of how this all works.
     
    #11
  12. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    Fuzz, you play with the exact same specs as I do! 13.4oz 11pts head light PSC 6.1 LOL! That is quite interesting! It's really easy to whip around for me. I have no problem playing fast paced doubles with it.

    -Fuji
     
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  13. dannymck

    dannymck New User

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    Wow, just got a Dunlop Biomimetic 500 Tour. 2pt HL. 11oz strung. Now I want it at 11.5 or 12 oz and 8-10 pt HL. What do yall think?
     
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  14. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    Fuzz Nation's post is excellent. What initially confused me about the use of points (I used to use inches as a measure way back when, ie. 1/4 inch HL) is that in most instances a "point" is 1/10th (or hundredth) of a unit not 1/8th. In tennis rackets, it is 1/8th of an inch.
     
    #14
  15. loverf

    loverf New User

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    For a particular racquet model have the same Head Light point irrespective of the grip size ? Will a 4 1/4 racquet will have less HeadLight( say 4) than a 4 3/8 (8 HL) as the grip is thicker ?
     
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