What gas is in tennis balls??

Discussion in 'Other Equipment' started by chrischris, Sep 29, 2012.

  1. chrischris

    chrischris Hall of Fame

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    My GF asked me a question last night that i was a bit at odds with .. 'whats inside the tennis balls'? i said i dunno.
     
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  2. The Meat

    The Meat Hall of Fame

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    Regular, like what most people use nowadays. Premium is too expensive.
     
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  3. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Ba-ZING-a!

    Unless things have changed, it's ambient air in most balls. Gamma used to put nitrogen to slow the pressure loss, but I don't know if that's what they do currently.
     
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  4. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    Well, if your shots really stink, it might be methane!
     
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  5. ricki

    ricki Professional

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    neon :)

    btw babolat has some ballz with N...
     
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  6. chrischris

    chrischris Hall of Fame

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    WTF, noone knows ??? we all use them , yet no clues as to whats inside them .. no wonder we are losing out to the Chinese:)LOL
     
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  7. ATP100

    ATP100 Professional

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    Easy Answer:

    Nitrogen and oxygen. Nitrogen makes up 78.05%, oxygen another 20.95%. The remaining less than 1% is primarily argon, but carbon dioxide, neon, helium, methane and krypton are also present.
     
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  8. The Meat

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    ^This, the main compositions of air in the atmosphere

    What I can definitely exclude out of the possible gases are: Neon, Hydrogen, and Helium. These three gases would leak out of the rubber walls faster.

    My best guess if it were practical is methane gas, doesn't leak out as fast due to it being a molecule and not just an element so its larger. CH4 for those who want to know it's formula.
     
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  9. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    The first clue was in post #3. As mentioned later, the composition is virtually nitrogen and oxygen...like the air we breathe. A 'pure' nitrogen use would slow pressure loss slightly and the balls could 'run' a little cooler like race car tires.
     
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  10. chrischris

    chrischris Hall of Fame

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    Practical... 'Natural' gas tennis balls.. da new schajt. :) LOL
     
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  11. robbo1970

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    Actually its methane....don't ever cut one, people with think you farted.











    Double bazinga.........I don't even care.
     
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  12. rafazx10

    rafazx10 Rookie

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    Would be nice if was some gas that doesnt get much affected by temperature change.

    But like said it is probably just air.
     
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  13. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    I know what the OP wanted the answer to be.
     
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  14. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    Yes, I believe that this is the correct answer. Nitrogen/Oxygen or regular air for most balls. The pressure (for pressurized balls) of a new ball can vary from one manufacturer (or model) to the next. I've seen pressures listed in the range from 1.6 to 1.8 atm (but I have seen some sources indicating only 1.2 atm for a pressurized ball). I believe that Gamma still uses Nitrogen only for many of their products.

    http://www.gammasports.com/gamma.cfm?product=922
     
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  15. The Meat

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    PV=nRT

    The ideal gas law. Temperature always affects pressure and volume negatively or positively, got to hate the laws of nature. :(
     
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  16. rafazx10

    rafazx10 Rookie

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    Yes but some gases expand (increase the ball pressure) more than the other with the same temperature change.
    Would be nice to have a more consistent pressure, ball gain a lot of heat when you are hitting, while the others cool down on the court.
     
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  17. The Meat

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    I need to one day create pressureless balls that feel and imitate a natural pressured ball's bounce, would make a lot of money off of that. :)
     
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  18. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    .


    This post intentionally left blank.


    .​
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2012
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  19. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    P=nRT/V

    What, in this equation, would account for that? Since the Volume of the ball does not change appreciably, everything on the right side of the equation above is essentially a constant except for Temp.

    Is it possible that some gasses act more like an ideal gas than others?
     
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  20. ricki

    ricki Professional

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    gas type and temp are variables, pure nitrogen should be theoretically most consistent.

    O2 "permeates" approximately 3-4 times faster than does N2 through a typical rubber, as is used in tires, primarily
    because O2 has a slightly smaller effective molecular size than does N2.

    source: www.getnitrogen.org/pdf/graham.pdf
     
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  21. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    Gamma ProTour Balls use Nitrogen.
     
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  22. The Meat

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    Just to put it out there.

    P= Pressure
    V= Volume
    n= number of Moles in system
    R= Gas constant (0.8026 or something)
    T= Temperature

    n= m/M
    moles= mass/ Molar Mass(mass of all elements, e.g. N2=28 amu)

    Also, adding to ricki's explanation of oxygen and nitrogen diffusion. Oxygen gas(O2) should diffuse slower than Nitrogen gas(N2) because the molecular weight of oxygen gas is more than Nitrogen gas. However Oxygen only makes a single bond with another oxygen, while Nitrogen makes a triple bond to another Nitrogen(to complete the octet rule(8 electrons surrounding one element)). So Oxygen is smaller than Nitrogen, making it diffuse slower.
     
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  23. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    Can anyone explain the effect of storing tennis balls in a pressurized container with more than 14 psi? Like 30 psi
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2012
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  24. coachrick

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    In theory, over a long period of time, the pressures would seek balance--thus increasing the pressure inside the ball to match that of the container. Might take a heck of a long time ;) ...and you'd have one LIVELY, non-conforming tennis ball! :)
     
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  25. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    But the claim by rafazx10 really had nothing to do with how quickly a given gas permeates. The claim was that some gases expand faster than others with an increase in Temp. I'm pretty sure he was talking about a short term effect. I don't see anything in the ideal gas law equation that says the Pressure of one gas will be affected more by Temp than another. The bounce of a pressurized ball is due, in large part, to the internal pressure relative to the external pressure.
     
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  26. ramos77

    ramos77 Semi-Pro

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    Apparently Babolat balls are filled with Nadals farts, straight after he has a Paella...
     
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  27. rafazx10

    rafazx10 Rookie

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    It is because of the moisture in the air, which is not found on nitrogen.
     
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  28. diggler

    diggler Professional

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    I think it depends on how the balls are made.

    I read somewhere that when some balls are made, a pellet is put inside when they join the 2 halves together. The pellet sublimates from solid to gas and hence creates gas pressure.

    Other balls are just air filled.
     
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  29. Ronaldo

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    So that is why some balls rattle when shaken
     
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  30. The Meat

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    Sublimation is the phase shift from a solid form to a gaseous form due to a change of temperature or pressure above a certain point. So the solid isn't there anymore, a ball that rattle might be a dog toy :)
     
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  31. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    Usually those balls are dogs.
     
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  32. diggler

    diggler Professional

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    I haven't had a rattler in years. Maybe they don't make them like that anymore.
     
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  33. Nostradamus

    Nostradamus G.O.A.T.

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    i thin you are right. it is liquid nitrogen
     
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  34. zorcy3

    zorcy3 New User

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    I saw on Discovery or Learning channel, I think, that it is CO2 in most balls. The rubber is porous enough for O2 to pass easily. Regular air will pass back and forth as you pressurize it in a tank. Eventually, the harder to pass molecules, N2 and CO2, will not bother to go into the ball. This will take a faster charge, but die out before you are finished with practice. When you recharge, consider other gases. N2 is the best, CO2 is second and regular air is the fall back. Never use O2, it just bleeds back out too fast.

    As far as what happens on the balls in a tank? At 14 PSI of CO2, they will stay at their normal hardness. If they stay long enough, some CO2 will get inside. At 30 PSI of CO2, It will charge faster. Maybe as fast as 3 days. It will push CO2 into the ball, not letting O2 out. If you let it sit for a week or 2, the O2 will come out on its own and it will have more CO2 in the ball.

    If you don't have a tank, get one. They are great, unless you are some major player that kills the felt every time you open a new sleeve.
     
    #34
  35. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Oh no, the OP finally got the answer he wanted in post #34. Wait for it...wait for it...
     
    #35
  36. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    Ty, never could recharge dead balls even after two weeks in my tank at 25-30 psi. Awesome sound though, unleashing the pressure.
     
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