What I hate about Junior tennis. Kids, read this

Discussion in 'Junior League & Tournament Talk' started by Tennisstringz, Jul 11, 2012.

  1. barringer97

    barringer97 Rookie

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    My kid won't be playing center or forward (so limited scholarships).

    And no, the % of white guards in NCAA D I is very limited.
     
    #51
  2. tball2day

    tball2day Semi-Pro

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    ........................
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2012
    #52
  3. Misterbill

    Misterbill Semi-Pro

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    Right. Doesn't mean full for the women either, if the school is not fully-funded for tennis
     
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  4. paulmaben

    paulmaben Rookie

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    Barringer i am in your boat a bit. I can train my kids. Triplets are nine years old and started tournaments this year. Twins are 3.5 years of age and have started hitting. We train four or five days a week, play junior team tennis, and dont do privates or clinics. If they show promise i will travel a bit but i feel we have enough competition in the south( knoxville) not far from atlanta. Im not going to chase points when they r young.
     
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  5. coaching32yrs

    coaching32yrs Semi-Pro

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    I do not understand the obsession with scholarships. We made academics our #1 priority. Our kids worked very hard in school and were good tennis players. The top D3 academic colleges wanted them, along with a few mid major D1's. If you qualify academically and athletically the top D3 schools offer generous need based financial aid. In our case about 50%. The other 50% was a little tough but it wasn't that much more than we had been paying for lessons, training, equipment and tournaments. It was the best investment we could ever make. The key is the academics.
    They have to be near the top of the class.
     
    #55
  6. barringer97

    barringer97 Rookie

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    For me, it's not financial aid, it's playing at the school they want to go to. Financial aid would by icing on the cake.
     
    #56
  7. Tennisstringz

    Tennisstringz New User

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    You're talking about ten to fifteen years ago? It seemed a bit easier then. Better funded and less foreignors. You got a full ride? Then you were probably from Cali and ranked in the top 50 nationally. Did you get your first choice?

    Your child has a much better chance in tennis or football because he has a coach for a parent and he doesn t have to shell out $50 to $100 everytime he wants a lesson. Imagine erasing everytime you hit with your son or everytime he hit in your groups or with a connection you have... Now where is he in his tennis development?
     
    #57
  8. Tennisstringz

    Tennisstringz New User

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    i meant in tennis than for football
     
    #58
  9. 10ismom

    10ismom Semi-Pro

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    Don't forget to let your children expose to other sports, music, art esp when they're young. You have a set of triplets and twins so chances are one or more children might enjoy or has great potential in another area.

    Besides my full time career I am also an accomplished piano player. I can teach my 2 children and save money but chose not to. When they were young, they were given opportunities to play different sports, learn different musical instruments, exposing to dances, art, etc. My 19 yo chose to carry on tennis and a few things till finished up her high school while my younger one enjoys mostly tennis. They both excel in their on individual way.
    The point is even though tennis might be convenient for you, if you can afford it, let your children expose to other sports, music or other areas. The one special gift that (at least) one of your child has, might then be discovered and nurtured.
     
    #59
  10. 10ismom

    10ismom Semi-Pro

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    Tennisstringz
    I agree with the point that it is easier financially for a previous D1 tennis player to teach his own children tennis and maybe better chances to play and obtain college tennis scholarship(s).
    Many posters and readers here pay for lessons so you're not alone.
    I admired your dedication to your child(ren)'s tennis development and your many posts that certainly will make people think esp if their children are new to tennis. Having said that, we all need to make adjustments. You might think you've done everything (you could have) but when time for recruiting, college options might not be as planned.
    Maybe starting with where will your child be happy at and what would work financially for you. The foreign student in another thread has to make some adjustment too. College recruiting/admission is just not easy.
     
    #60
  11. barringer97

    barringer97 Rookie

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    Oh I agree, just pointing out my kids have a way better shot in tennis then any other sport because of me.
     
    #61
  12. paulmaben

    paulmaben Rookie

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    tennismom,

    I agree with you. Gotta have balance. My wife is in charge of music. Two of the triplets play piano and are doing very well. They do Suzuki method and my wife is a very skilled musician who is able to train them. My other son is a violinist and he is taught by a teacher and my wife. We have tried other sports such as t-ball and soccer, but the kids just don't like them. They all enjoy art and have some talent there too. It is a juggling act.
     
    #62
  13. 10ismom

    10ismom Semi-Pro

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    That's awesome!
    Your home is full of happy little athletes, budding musical talents and artists then. You must be proud of them and.... I'm sure, they are proud of their own achievements too.
    Best of Luck. : )
     
    #63
  14. Tennisstringz

    Tennisstringz New User

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    You are 6'1 and white. Could you get your speed to 4,6 in the forty? With much less effort than it would take to develop a 120 mph serve. I could get you a full D1 football scholarship in the MAC as a safety after four years of high school football. Unless you are a wimp.

    It doesn't take that much for football. I know our high school sends one a year to D1, and some to d2 or 1aa. Tennis? None yet.
     
    #64
  15. tennisplayer1993

    tennisplayer1993 Semi-Pro

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    I can relate to #1. Lost a semifinal of a tournament just because the other guy was giving bogus calls on a clay court even though I could clearly see it hit the line and he would call it out. I got sick of it halfway through the match and just stopped questioning his calls. He was also considerably bigger than me and scared me a bit. I lost that match because of a lot of unfair calls on his part.
     
    #65
  16. barringer97

    barringer97 Rookie

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    I disagree, mainly because I have been clocked at 130mph.

    I have plenty of friends that could run a 4.6 40 with good size and no one is getting full rides...in fact, not even walk ons.
     
    #66
  17. chalkflewup

    chalkflewup Hall of Fame

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    Too bad. Consider this match a learning experience! If you were my kid, this is what I`d tell you...

    1) Don`t let his size bother you.
    2) Don`t let his calls get to you. Stay calm. Get a ref.
    3) You did not lose the match because of unfair calls. You lost because you let him walk all over you. Life is no different. You have to learn to fight for yourself because if you don`t, nobody else will.
    4) Losers make excuses. Winners make adjustments.
     
    #67
  18. tennisplayer1993

    tennisplayer1993 Semi-Pro

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    Love the last two statements. Thanks :)
     
    #68
  19. Tennis_Stringman

    Tennis_Stringman Rookie

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    Well if you get good grades and have a high national ranking, junior tennis will get you off the fence and into the school you want to go to. I have seen many very good players not have the opportunity to attend a strong academic school because their grades were mediocre. You play for the love of the sport and enjoy playing a lifelong sport. Any parent/player who is playing for a D-1 scholarship will certainly be disappointed. There is not enough money to go around and you will always spend more that what it"s worth.
     
    #69

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