What kind of stringer for a 12 year old breaking strings every other day?

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by Tennisdork, Oct 21, 2010.

  1. Tennisdork

    Tennisdork New User

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    My son is breaking strings every other day and its killing me .I told him I will buy him a stringer but he must learn to do it himself.We want a a stringer we can take to tournaments with us and that is good quality.Not really wanting a drop weight machine , any suggestions?THANKS
     
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  2. Jonny S&V

    Jonny S&V Hall of Fame

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    Well, not wanting a dropweight kinda eliminates all but a couple of stringers, but of the ones out there (and if you don't mind Eagnas):

    http://www.eagnas.com/hawk126e.html
     
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  3. Tennisdork

    Tennisdork New User

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    Gamma

    I saw a Gamma on tennis wharehouse thats about 600 , looked like table top?What I have read is the dropweights take alot longer to string than with crank machine?
     
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  4. Jonny S&V

    Jonny S&V Hall of Fame

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    It does take longer, but I have a Alpha Revo 4000, and it's pushing 80 lbs. I wouldn't call that particularly portable... A drop weight is the optimal portable stringer, and even if it adds 5-10 min a racquet (which is about what it does adds, depending on the fluency of the stringer), it's still great for stringing as long as you take your time and don't rush. Of the drop-weights out there, the Klippermate is the premier traveling drop-weight stringer with the Gamma X-2 (I don't know what they call it now) being a close second.

    EDIT: The Alpha Revo is a fixed-clamp, table-top crank.
     
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  5. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Why wouldn't you want a dropweight machine? A Klippermate or Gamma X-2 sounds about ideal for a new stringer like your son who wants a portable machine. Plus neither requires a huge upfront investment in case your son's tennis or stringing activities stop for whatever reason.

    Personally, I'd be worried more about transporting a crank machine as I think there would be a higher chance of breaking something, particularly in the cranking mechanism, if you move it a lot. Just my $.02.
     
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  6. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    ^^ Agreed, why wouldn't you want a drop weight machine. They are very portable, not much that can go wrong, and inexpensive. I would suggest the Gamma machines.

    One more point is you may want your son to string his own rackets but after you buy a machine you son may find it is not something he really wants to do and the stringer will sit in the closet.

    Rather than getting a stringer have you thought about changes the strings that you son presently uses? There are a lot of options out there today.

    Irvin
     
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  7. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    With machines you get what you pay for. I would get a decent quality machine with a decent # of features,(My minimum would be:fixed clamps, 6 point suspension mounting, linnear tension head, decent brake system), but that is me, many here like the inexpensive bare bones type of machine, just not my cup of tea.The features makes the job more enjoyable for me, therefore I can string more comfortable and do a great job. A great job also can be done on a low end model as well, it's just how you get there.
    If your son has a # of racquets you would not really need a portable unit. The machines on a stand are the most comfortable to string on.
    The USRSA has a good article here on machines:
    http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/articles/2008/08/2008_guide_to_stringing_machin.html

    And on this link, same article but features table page, if you click on the manufacturer, it takes you right to that manuf. site.
    This can give you more information for an informed decision. Good luck.
    http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/issues/200808/200808stringing_machines.html
     
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  8. rich s

    rich s Hall of Fame

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    Gamma X-ST or Gamma ST-II..... neither are drop weights, both are cranks, the difference between the two is the construction of the base.

    For your situation they sound like a good match. They aren't drop weights. They aren't electric/electronic, so if you needed to string at the tournament or in the parking lot you don't need to hunt down a power outlet.

    Whether you order from TW or directly from Gamma you get free ground shipping.

    I owned a Gamma 602FC and recently upgraded to a Gamma 6004, and have no problem recommending a Gamma machine to anyone.

    Additionally one of Gamma's Stringing Machine engineers is a member of the boards, his screen name is Gamma Tech.
     
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  9. dancraig

    dancraig Hall of Fame

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    Get a machine that you like.
    Many times a parent buys a machine, thinking the child will do the stringing. Soon, the child decides he hates stringing and the parent becomes the stringer.:rolleyes:
     
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  10. schap02

    schap02 Semi-Pro

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    Table top machine, probably a crank for you, 6 point mount - do some research and just pick one, IMO - you can't go wrong with a Gamma?
     
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  11. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    Great post.
     
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  12. MAX PLY

    MAX PLY Hall of Fame

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    ^^^+1

    Jim e's advice is very sound. I agree that there is nothing wrong with a dropweight but they are simply not as easy or as quick as crank. The fact they generally cost a bit more may be a factor (but even if he abandons stringing, you should be able to sell it and recoup much of your outlay). The Gammas are good suggestions--good, reliable and portable (relatively speaking). Also consider getting the stand for home use. Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2010
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  13. rich s

    rich s Hall of Fame

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    MAX.... did you mean Dropweight?
     
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  14. MAX PLY

    MAX PLY Hall of Fame

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    yep--fixed in original--thanks.
     
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  15. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

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    Other question..what kind of strings is he breaking so fast?
     
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  16. Radicalized

    Radicalized Semi-Pro

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    ^^Good question. And where on the string bed are the strings breaking?

    A fully assembled X-2 stores in an area about 26"L X 7"W X 16"H (with the arm down). Of course, you can easily take it apart and reassemble it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2010
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  17. Kevo

    Kevo Hall of Fame

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    If I were you I'd seriously look at a stringway dropweight. They are quite portable, and I think if it didn't work out you'd be able to sell it easily for a reasonable price. They are also quite fast since you don't have to worry about the weight getting close to horizontal.

    If he's breaking strings that fast, I think the first thing I would look into is a different string though.
     
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  18. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    Not only "what strings", but what racket? Maybe he needs to get a new frame with a denser pattern. Most 12-yr olds just don't break strings every other day.
     
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  19. Parker512

    Parker512 Guest

    Whats your budget?
     
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  20. Tennisdork

    Tennisdork New User

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    Thanks everyone for the advice this board is awesome!!

    He plays with a Bab aeropro and uses a poly and multifilament blend Kischbaum, he has to stay with those strings because we got a ton of it for free :).The most I can spend is 1000 and that would kinda hurt.I have watched a guy string on A prince areos and it looked fairly simple so we like that one , but not portable.
     
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  21. nalvarado

    nalvarado Semi-Pro

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    With a combination like that you're asking for tennis elbow and a blown shoulder. Try some CHEAP tourney nylon and see if he breaks that in a day.
     
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  22. dlesser13

    dlesser13 Rookie

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    My guess is he isn't actually "breaking" strings so much as possibly fraying the multi crosses. I highly doubt a 12 year old is breaking poly hybrids every other day. Just buy the kid more rackets, problem solved. If you are serious about tennis, he should have atleast 2 if not 3 rackets strung at all times.
     
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  23. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    i used to hit rocks with my racket at that age too.

    worked every time (broken strings).

    really though, if you must, get a decent machine (features).
    i tend to think a DW with fixed clamps/6 point mount and linear
    gripper (on the tension arm) would be the way to go.

    he will learn good/better/consistent technique because you
    can't really rush a DW, IMO, like you can a crank. he won't
    have as much problem mounting (maybe!!) with a 6 pt.
    and lastly, a linear gripper is just simpler, IMO.

    I'm an eagnas owner (maybe check out the challenger I),
    but i totally understand if you want a premium (brand) machine.

    .02!!
     
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  24. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    Try turning the strings around. Put the multi in the mains and the poly in the crosses. I know, it seems opposite what most would say for durability, but if he's breaking it every other day, he's probably mis-hitting and shearing the poly. I'd guess that he may have better durability with the poly in the cross.
     
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  25. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    I have found that if you are a big string breaker the last thing you want to do is hybrid poly and multifilament. Try stringing the racket with all poly and or all multifilament. If that does not work find another syn gut string to hybrid with the poly. It is cheaper to buy strings that will last a week than pay for stringing every day.

    Irvin
     
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  26. origmarm

    origmarm Hall of Fame

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    Poly/Multi breaks for me real quick also and I'm not a breaker at all. I get MUCH better durability with a full bed of either. I put Prince Syn Gut Duraflex in the crosses now. Much better durability and more or less the same hybrid feel/power. With an AeroPro I can understand chewing through the stringbed.

    Which normally goes first? The cross or the main?

    EDIT: Best portable non-dropweight is the X-ST in my opinion but I haven't used many of those (2). I would really consider a dropweight just for the portability and it won't hurt learn it properly from the start. I'm about 10m slower on my dropweight than on the crank
     
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  27. HitItHarder

    HitItHarder Semi-Pro

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    The only thing I would add is that you really need to consider the weight of the stringer (not just the size) since you want to travel with it.

    Table top crank stringers (like the Revo 4000 which I own) can be very heavy and bulky. I can't tell you the exact weight of my Revo, but it weighs in excess of 50lbs. I typically string in my office upstairs at my house, but occasionally I will take it downstairs and string in front of the TV with the family. Just doing that is a pain because of the weight and awkwardness of carrying the thing.

    Traveling with it is also a pain because it can take up a lot of room in a trunk. Honestly, if it were me, I would get a smaller drop weight machine for travel.
     
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  28. origmarm

    origmarm Hall of Fame

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    Yeah I completely agree, this is why I went with the X-ST over the Revo on the recommend below. The Revo is the better machine but the X-ST is lighter. Dropweight all the way for portable. Even my Swing that I travel with is very heavy. K-Mate or X-2 are much lighter. K-Mate even has a case I think??
     
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