What makes a good volleying racquet?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by GasquetGOAT, May 16, 2008.

  1. GasquetGOAT

    GasquetGOAT Hall of Fame

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    ...independent of the person holding it.

    Small head?

    Thin beam? What defines thin?

    High stiffness?

    Head light Balance? 8 pts HL or more?
     
    #1
  2. baek57

    baek57 Professional

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    heavy weight
     
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  3. Bubba

    Bubba Professional

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    Player technique first...
    Then optimize with a frame.
     
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  4. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    To a large degree, I think you know it when you feel it. A good volleying racquet can be a rather different animal from one player to the next.

    I used to be rather put off by a frame that felt too soft, but now I play with flexible sticks all the time and they're great for me. Headlight balance of 8-10 pts. is where I like it, but a racquet also has to have enough mass in the head so that it feels like the ball doesn't push it around. Stiffness to some degree can give a frame more pop or crispness that feels great for volleys, but as an all court player, I like enough flex in my racquets so that I can control my strokes, too.

    A few racquets that I've enjoyed as a net crasher include the Prostaff 6.1 Classic (before I switched to more flexible stuff), the Volkl C10 Pro, Yonex RDS 002 Tour, and Prince NXG mid. Also noodling around right now with a Yonex RQ iS 1 Tour and it feels pretty nice, but for my needs I had to put some lead on the hoop to get the stability up where I like it.
     
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  5. Doc Hollidae

    Doc Hollidae Hall of Fame

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    Stability, Maneuverability, and Control

    I'd also say low power, but that fits in with control.
     
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  6. GPB

    GPB Professional

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    A big head, so you can always get the racket on the ball!
    Look at the Big Bubba for an example!

    Yeah but not really.
     
    #6
  7. In D Zone

    In D Zone Hall of Fame

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    Definitely: Headlight

    Weight: between 12 to 12.5 oz

    Thin frame between 18 to 21 mm

    Head frame - Mid or Midplus does not matter.

    Frame Stiffness? well, I that if I have the above qualities in a frame I am good. I can play between a Flex to Mid Flex (max 67) stiffness frames.

    Some of the racquets I like for volleys:
    - RDS001 mid
    - RDS002 TOur
    - N6.1 Tour 90
    - Prince Mono
    - Volkl Tour 10 VE
    - Super RD Tour 90
    - M Fil 200
     
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  8. Gmedlo

    Gmedlo Professional

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    It's completely personal, IMO. The deciding factor for me is usually how I handle the SW of the racquet- if it's too low, my volleys don't penetrate, but if it's too high, I can't get the racquet around well enough.

    I actually wouldn't say low-power is a trait that you would want for volleying, most of which occurs if you're playing doubles or are doing some S&V, where most people could use all the power they can get.
     
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  9. GasquetGOAT

    GasquetGOAT Hall of Fame

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    Thanks.

    Is this how you would rate each aspects in the order of importance? ie Headlight more important than stiffness?
     
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  10. El Guapo

    El Guapo Semi-Pro

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    Like everyone else has said. Heavy, headlight, stiff. I like a leaded-up nPro Open.
     
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  11. Eastern Technifibre

    Eastern Technifibre Rookie

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    Technifibre 320 is awesome for volleying.
     
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  12. Eastern Technifibre

    Eastern Technifibre Rookie

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    Babolats are horrible for volleying
     
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  13. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    This has been discussed quite a few times. If you do a search you will find more information.

    Tastes are a personal thing but many SV players prefer: heavy, rather small (95-90 square inch) frames. There is no consensus about flex: some say the racquet has to be stiff to have punch, other say it needs to be flexible for touch. Anyway, there is no racquet that is going to turn a lousy volleyer into Pete Sampras.
     
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  14. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    To answer the OP's question: thin beamed racquets with a constant beam seem to score well among volleyers. It seems box beam also seems to help.
     
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  15. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    And finally headlight makes for maneuverability. You wouldn't want to go to the net with a headheavy racquet. I think that between 6 and 8 pts headlight suits most players for volleying.
     
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  16. [d]ragon

    [d]ragon Hall of Fame

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    in addition to user technique, stabilty while maintaining manueverable is important as well as having the right amount of pop. feel is up to the user
     
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  17. crash1929

    crash1929 Hall of Fame

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    babolats are horrible for volleying!!! LOL so funny. NO TOUCH! lol..hmm who am I thinking about right now? (by the way I use the pure control)
     
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  18. crash1929

    crash1929 Hall of Fame

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    eastern tech's post is sooo funny common guys can I feel the love here? (ie fellow babolat users)

    pure control biganger 65lbs.
     
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  19. pmerk34

    pmerk34 Legend

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    Head Prestige MP
     
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  20. babolat15

    babolat15 Hall of Fame

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    personally, I think the AG 300 is a great volleying stick, does anyone agree
     
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  21. samster

    samster Legend

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    head light, somewhat heavy frame, not too high swingweight though.
     
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  22. crash1929

    crash1929 Hall of Fame

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    i would look at who the best volleyers of all time were and see what sticks they chose.
     
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  23. paulfreda

    paulfreda Hall of Fame

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    Mass, mass, mass

    Here here !!!!

    No question that mass makes volleying a breeze.
    Smaller stroke needed.
    Blocked volleys are enough most of the time.
    The frame can be heavy and headlight and thus manuverable
    by placing the weight in the "Cauthen" mode ... in the handle
    under and above the hand.
     
    #23
  24. deme08

    deme08 Professional

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    My TT Warrior is great for volleys, the high stiffness plays a big role.
     
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  25. [K]Topspin

    [K]Topspin Guest

    A player's racket specs. That makes a good volleying frame. The best out there? IMO , the K90
     
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  26. pmerk34

    pmerk34 Legend

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    Edberg and Macs frames are discontinued
     
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  27. jxs653

    jxs653 Rookie

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    I am a heresy here, but 102 square inch head and a little head-heavy works best for me.
     
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  28. babolatisduhbomb

    babolatisduhbomb Banned

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    aeroprodrive (rafa nadal) racqet its a great vollying racqet
     
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  29. Gee

    Gee Professional

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    I agree. Very versatile and maneuverable frame. I added a little lead at 3 and 9 for some more swingweight, stability and power.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2008
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  30. kalic

    kalic Professional

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    ...and denser string pattern...
     
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  31. Big Boris

    Big Boris Rookie

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    Lead at 12

    Maybe contrary to common opinions I think a little lead around the 12 position in the hoop improves the direction of my volleys.

    If I only have lead at 3 and 9, which many say is the best for volleys, I feel the volley slips away outside the sidelines, or dies.

    I wonder why. Something todo with extending the "sweet spot" towards 12, or making the string bed more uniform?
     
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  32. Gee

    Gee Professional

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    Try to determine on what sweetspot you hit the ball mostly.

    Maybe you (like many people) are inclined to hit slightly above the center sweetspot of the frame.

    When you add weight at 12 (or 10 and 2) you raise the center sweetspot to the hoop of your frame and therefore you 'll hit with more control.
     
    #32
  33. BOZO

    BOZO Rookie

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    I don't know how to explain but everytime I heard which one is the best volleying racquet then the AG200 comes up to my head, head light & dense string pattern & a little bit stiff & low power might be the keys. I mean like a pin point type of volleys though but if you want to block the ball then must be the bigger size ; )
     
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  34. Gee

    Gee Professional

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    In my opinion AG200 has a (too) high swingweight for serve and volley game.
     
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  35. Big Boris

    Big Boris Rookie

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    Thanks! Any idea how much the sweetspot is raised per gram put at 12?

    Im considering skipping the 12 lead and instead move up the 3 and 9 lead to be centered around my "hitting spot". Do you think this will be a good idea?

    Of course I will have to reduce it a little to keep the Swingweight however.
     
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  36. Big Boris

    Big Boris Rookie

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    Or should I get an extra long racquet?
     
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  37. Il Mostro

    Il Mostro Banned

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    Well, back in my SV days, my trusty old PS 85 served me well. I never thought about the technical features then; it just worked. Today, it's a weird alchemy of flex, good maneuverability and just enough mass in my case. I like the KB98 at the net.
     
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  38. Wilson6-1

    Wilson6-1 Rookie

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    I think the general consensus would be a slightly heavier headlight racquet with a mid to midplus size head.

    In my opinion, you should pick several racquets to demo with the specs that will satisfy your overall game (serve, baseline, etc) and then play/practice volleys at the service line. If you can volley effectively at midcourt, then you have found a solid racquet for volleys. Keep in mind, you still need to have maneuverability at the net, but you can stick a lot of racquets out and block back a volley at the net, however, good racquets will allow you to volley consistently, with placement, pace, and control from anywhere on the court.

    I prefer the ncode 6.1, but there are many racquets that play well.
     
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  39. federer envies me

    federer envies me Semi-Pro

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    the fischer m pro #1 98 no tolerance is great for volleying
     
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  40. Char

    Char Rookie

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    Beautiful choice. I S&V and almost got this racquet after many demos. I ended up going with the Technifibre T-Fight 320 18x20 with a leather grip and gut. Heaven. For me anyway.
     
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  41. GasquetGOAT

    GasquetGOAT Hall of Fame

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    Are extended racquets more difficult for volleying compared to normal length?
     
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  42. nCode747

    nCode747 Semi-Pro

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    it all matters on the amount of pop you get off the racquet.
     
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  43. pmerk34

    pmerk34 Legend

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    yes they are
     
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  44. travlerajm

    travlerajm Hall of Fame

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    The best volley racquet I've ever used is my current racquet:

    Platform: Cutoff POG LB
    Length: 26.75" (Shorter is better for volleys - I use this length because it's optimal length for forehands and serves)
    Headsize: 100" (headsize not really that important)
    Lead at 3 and 9: 43g (this is ultraimportant for directional control)
    Lead in handle: 48g (this is important for depth control)
    Total Weight: 13.9 oz. (Mass matters!)
    Swingweight: 357 (I don't start to lose maneuveability until I get into the mid 360s, but I hate volleying with any racquet with swingweight lower than 350)
    Beam: 19mm (Stiffer is better for volleys, but thin beam is fine if you have enough mass, and thin beam lets me get spin on my groundies)
    String: Kevlar mains/SPPP crosses 52 lbs (I've found string type and tension doesn't matter that much as long as it's not too springy - I use this setup to maximize bite while maintaining playability for many months; for volleys, less bite is actually desirable - but the good bite is fine as long as your twistweight is high like mine)
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2008
    #44
  45. DarthCow

    DarthCow Rookie

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    A good mix between stability, and maneuverability
    With proper technique provides great volleys.

    A.k.a; PK BLACK ACE.
    Its so solid from the weight, its flexible, but its not as maneuverable
     
    #45
  46. VikingSamurai

    VikingSamurai Banned

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    Answer:
    Someone that can volley! ;)
     
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  47. beedlejuice22

    beedlejuice22 Semi-Pro

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    What makes a good volleying racquet?

    A good player holding it.
     
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  48. GasquetGOAT

    GasquetGOAT Hall of Fame

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    Interesting. Thanks for the reply. But why is that length optimal for forehands and serves? Doesn't a longer racquet gives you more leverage and reach therefore more power and better trajectory for the serve, respectively?
     
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  49. pmerk34

    pmerk34 Legend

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    Longer racquets are great for serves but worse for volleys
     
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  50. GasquetGOAT

    GasquetGOAT Hall of Fame

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    Thats not what I asked.
     
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