what makes the differences in price?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by raiden031, Sep 29, 2006.

  1. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    What makes the differences in price? I know that most cheap $30 walmart racquets are made out of aluminum/titanium and that most racquets above $80 are made out of graphite and other materials. But what makes the difference between a $100 racquet and a $250 racquet? It seems like whether its a beginner or advanced player racquet makes no difference.

    Also whats the difference between the playability of a walmart racquet with an expensive racquet?
     
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  2. Tennis Man

    Tennis Man Hall of Fame

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    It's part design/materials, part marketing. The advanced racquets always have much better designs/composition and share bigger chunk of marketing expenses (incuding costs of endorsements, etc). That's why thet are cost more than twice the begginer's racquets.
     
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  3. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    My point was that it doesn't seem to matter whether they are for advanced or beginners, once they cross over the 80-100 threshold. I have seen many very powerful OS beginner's racquets costing near $250. Alot of the racquets used by pros are near the lower 100s.
     
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  4. c_zimma

    c_zimma Semi-Pro

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    People should play with whatever feels right. It may cost a little more to make a $200 racquet compared to a $100, but it's mostly marketing.
     
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  5. louis netman

    louis netman Hall of Fame

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    1) Cost of production and profit margin.
    2) Walmart's reputation as a viable retailer for middle America is not dependent on the playability of its tennis rackets, whereas, a racket manufacturer's (e.g. Wilson, Head, Volkl) reputation IS dependent on the playability of its products...
     
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  6. Tennis Man

    Tennis Man Hall of Fame

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    You said it, powerful. Yes, some of them are more expensive to produce. Look at Head Flexpoint 10 or Wilson n3 nCode Racquets at over$230.

    At the same time, some players racquets like Mfil-300 (under $100) are very simple in design and production which doesn't make them less desireable.
     
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  7. VGP

    VGP Legend

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    For the $100-$250 range.....it's marketing.....plain and simple.

    Just wait until the new models come out with the "new" technologies and paintjobs and buy rackets that are on clearance.

    I got my Dunlop HM200gs for $60 and I don't think paying extra is all that worth it.
     
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  8. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    At the Sports Authority, those racquets in the $180 to $250 range freqently drop by more than 50% in price. They just better
    hope that the folks buying racquets in the spring don't drop by.
     
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  9. POGforEver

    POGforEver Rookie

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    Here's my look at it...most advanced players are going to buy more than 2 or 3 of the same racquet where as recreational players only usually buy one. So when the racquet companies want to sell to non-advanced or recreational players they up the price because they figure that they're not going to get the repeat sale that they would with a more advanced player’s racquet. Look at the Prince O3 Silver, this stick goes for $260 and then look at another Prince stick, the POG, which you can buy 2 of those and it still would not be the same price. Companies know that recreational players are willing to pay the big price because they are only going to buy one racquet. I hope I explained that the way I wanted to and that it answers the question as well, I’m really tired and time for me to sleep!
     
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  10. emcee

    emcee Semi-Pro

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    That makes a lot of sense. I don't think it'd cost THAT much more to make a snowshoe racquet, except maybe the ones with computer chips and stuff in em.
     
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  11. Tennis Man

    Tennis Man Hall of Fame

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    You probably made a good point but the questions was why beginners racquets are so cheap (Walmart) compared to advanced and vice versa (powerful beginner frames).
     
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  12. FuriousYellow

    FuriousYellow Professional

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    I guess they figure once they hook you with the $50 racquet, you'll be willing to spend extra bucks on one of the hi-tech GI frames if you think it's going to "improve" your game significantly.

    Worked on me. I started with a $49.99 Head Ti.S5, played with it for two months, then discovered tenniswarehouse.com. They had me by the gonads after that.
     
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  13. p0w3r

    p0w3r Semi-Pro

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    Also, i have heard that those beginner frames uses stiffer graphite, which costs more then other graphite used in more flexible player's frames...plus more graphite is used on those racquets since the beams and headsizes are huge.
     
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  14. Tennis Man

    Tennis Man Hall of Fame

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    Another good point. Actually I believe they make more money on HS, college, club and other organized tennis than just recreational players. The latter usually buy a cheap racquet and stick with it b/c they don't have much time or desire to play anyway. On another side, the former play, break and collect racquets and use all kind of gear and accessories in huge volumes (like most of guys here).

    So, IMHO the margins are much higher on the "semi-pro+" level than with beginners and alike.
     
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  15. newnuse

    newnuse Professional

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    The difference between a 100 and 250 racket??? Marketing.... The actual cost to produce a 100 vs a 250 is probably the same... if it isn't, it's very close. The difference in cost of production is not $150.

    The makers having certain categories of rackets designed to cater a certain market. They start off with the most expensive rackets say $250. They can't just sell rackets at this price since the market is only a small percentage of the overall market. They introduce different models priced at different levels to cover the entire market.

    It's all marketing. The labor, the materials, shipping..etc is all the same or very close.
     
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  16. thejerk

    thejerk Semi-Pro

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    Actually, not counting walmart, beginners rackets cost more. When somebody doesn't know what they are getting, they go to someplace like Sports Authority and see power rackets(usually beginner) and think, "gee this will give me alota power." They are more expensive because those buying them haven't a clue.

    Advanced rackets are cheaper because people who buy player rackets know the marketing game.

    You will notice that the lighter a racket is, the more expensive it will be. That rule is for new rackets mostly. They all tend to equal out around the time that the new lines come out. People are actually paying more money for less graphite. I find that to be hillarious.
     
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  17. jonolau

    jonolau Legend

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    Marketing and perceptions. Give you an example:

    Brand new Volkl C10 Pro Tour selling for $140 in the tennis pro shops. Carrefour (French chain of hypermarts) selling the same racquet for $60 brand new only because they received a one-time lot of stocks probably at a cheap price.
     
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