What point do you retire from a match?

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by Alchemy-Z, May 10, 2012.

  1. Alchemy-Z

    Alchemy-Z Hall of Fame

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    I took a pretty good fall at a tournament 2 weeks before our team went to state. I took it easy and went to go play singles for our team.

    1st day we had 2 matches the first I did okay but the 2nd was nearly unbearable. I played hockey for years so playing injured was a way of life but I am finding out now that playing injured at 32 is not the same as playing injured at 23.

    I lost the first set 6-1 and was down 0-4 in the second set and thought to myself throw in the towel... it's just tennis.

    but then I said if you win the next game keep playing if you lose quit.

    well I won the next 2 games so here we are at 4-2 me serving and at 30-30 I made a lunge i shouldn't have and about crumpled to the ground.

    finished the game so 5-2 him serving and I felt like another run would do me in but I felt like 5-2 was a chump time to retire so I walked on over...he asked "are you sure?" I said lets just finish.. he served I returned them into the net he won 6-2.

    He was a nice guy and wished me luck on getting better. but I was torn the rest of the day on should I have just shook hands at 0-4? and was tanking a final game just to lose a sportsman thing to do?
     
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  2. andfor

    andfor Hall of Fame

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    If you can't continue due to excessive pain or risk of further injury, just retire. One match is not worth further injury. If you can hobble around and possibly work your way back into the match, even if it's far fetched, with out fear of further injury, play it out.

    Tanking to avoid an injury default, it just a tank to me. Sorry. You'll likely handle it different if it happens again.
     
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  3. zcarzach

    zcarzach Professional

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    Hard to say, only you know how bad you were hurting and if you could continue. As far as I'm concerned, retiring from a match is the right thing to do if you literally cannot play on, not just that you are hurting and losing, which makes it hurt that much more. Personally, it sounds like you did the right thing by finishing the match, but I can't say I'd be happy with the hitting the returns into the net intentionally.

    If you are out there, play hard. If you can't play hard, don't be out there.
     
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  4. leech

    leech Rookie

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    I'm not sure; what was the extent of your injury? If I could move around without further risk to myself, I would have continued playing. I wouldn't retire just because I was tired or thought that a loss was imminent.
     
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  5. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    If I'm ever feeling that I could get injured further in a match, I retire. It's not worth it to me to try and keep playing if I am running the risk of more serious injury. (Yes, that means I have retired while I have been ahead before.)

    -Fuji
     
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  6. SlapShot

    SlapShot Hall of Fame

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    I've only had one match where I should have retired due to injury - felt some mild pain in my ankle in the first set, and played through it. We ended up splitting sets, and this league played a full third. By the middle of the third set, what started as mild pain had turned into me doubling over in pain between points, but playing through it. The third set went to a tiebreak, so I was on the court almost a total of 2.5 hours, the last hour of which, I was hobbling around just trying not to fall down.

    I ended up not being able to put pressure on the ankle for 5-6 days, and had to take almost a month off before playing tennis again. Probably should have thrown in the towel. But I usually don't know when to quit in the heat of battle. Which is why now, if I feel like there's a chance I might be injured, I literally just don't step on the court.
     
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  7. Alchemy-Z

    Alchemy-Z Hall of Fame

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    Yeah had this been a normal league match I would have called the captian and told him to give me a few weeks off.

    But it was my first time to state/we had exactly 8 players who could go so no back-up- I'd already resevred and paid for the hotel...got time off work ...etc.

    Like I stated in the OP I had played injured in hockey several times but it was years ago in my 20's and This is my first injury since turning 30 and it was a tough reality to deal with that I wasn't recovering quickly.

    in the future I will throw in the towel I have a lot of life outside of tennis to live and no need hurting myself.

    but it's a hard decision thats for sure.
     
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  8. leech

    leech Rookie

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    If I had this experience, I think it's safe to say that I'd be extremely wary of playing injured. But not having been injured before, I think it will be tough to know when to throw in the towel (as you mentioned, adrenaline in the heat of battle may prevent me from realizing the extent of the injury).
     
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  9. J_R_B

    J_R_B Hall of Fame

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    I rolled my ankle and sprained pretty badly a couple years ago. I continued through the first set, which I won 7-6, but I decided that was enough. It was swollen huge and black and blue by the next day (black and blue like bleeding on the inside, not just bruised). I'm actually really glad I didn't try to play on, especially given how it looked the next day even though I stopped. I had to stop for about 4 weeks before even testing it after that.
     
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  10. Alchemy-Z

    Alchemy-Z Hall of Fame

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    Thats where I was with it...I wasn't tired I was serving well and I was at my first state competition and quitting seem to be no where in my game plan.

    and also to clarify I didn't intentionally hit all his serves in the final game of the set I jsut took huge crack at his return and if the point went beyond that I was going to let them go....it just turned out I put them all in the net :mad:
     
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  11. Maui19

    Maui19 Hall of Fame

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    I don't know at what point you retire. I am of the "if your heart is still beating, play on" school, but I've had a couple injuries recently that have me rethinking that. I've had a couple injuries lately that I have made MUCH worse by playing, including a ruptured disc that sidelined me for two months. I have found that if I can treat the injury soon after it happens, my recovery time is extremely short. If I play on and aggravate it, I am out for weeks. So unless I am playing an important match, I err on the side of caution these days.

    Regarding tanking the last game, that is no different than quitting IMO.
     
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  12. goober

    goober Legend

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    Good choice. I know a guy that had a bad sprain the first set and but finished it and won. This was a tournament final and he decided to play the second set and his opponent just started pushing, drop shotting and extending points because he knew his opponent was injured. The guy had to end up quitting anyways because he injured even further and he was out for 6 months after that. It took him another 3 months to get back to where he was previously but even then his ankle was never the same. I am sure he thinks in retrospect it wasn't worth it.
     
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  13. Alchemy-Z

    Alchemy-Z Hall of Fame

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    Yeah for sure I will never tank again...afterwards it realized it was probably no fun for either of us.

    but I had a guy retire on me once (me winning) 8-3 in a tie break. me serving next for the match.

    and I thought...(you really can't play 2 more points?)

    and at 5-2 I thought he may have beat me healthy so no since in ending this in a walk over now when he earned a win.
     
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  14. cak

    cak Professional

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    I had an opponent drop on my match point. (3 hours, dehydration I think...) If she could get back up, I wouldn't have wanted to serve knowing she couldn't return. I'm glad she retired.
     
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  15. J_R_B

    J_R_B Hall of Fame

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    That was actually the same injury that I partially aggravated the day before we played in AZ. That was about 2 months after the original injury, and it wasn't nearly as bad the second time. I did have to go buy a little brace at Walgreen's or something to wear, though.

    Of course, I was just playing a social match, too, so that made the decision to quit playing easier. The only thing that was wasted was half of the $16 court fees that each paid for the indoor time.
     
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  16. tennisjon

    tennisjon Semi-Pro

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    I get injured all the time and play through it. Sometimes, I am not good at saying stop because certain injuries just hurt for a few minutes and certain injuries last for years. About 4 years ago I was playing a fun match against a good, but weaker player. I was up 5-2, 30-0. I moved to the right and felt my ab tear on one side. I won the point, so here it is match point, I play it out. On the next point with a weakened ab, I tear the other side. Now, I am in excruciating pain, but still a point from finishing it off. I go on to get to 5-5 and then I stop. I could barely keep my body straight.

    I then take off a couple of weeks, but spend the next few months barely moving on the court. In doing so, my leg muscles begin to weaken. With that, my knee cap moves and starts banging into the patella tendon and I develop tendonitis which lasts for 2 years and still comes around a couple of times a year.

    Had I just stopped after the first point I hurt myself and properly rehabbed, I might not have had to deal with an injury that lasted 6 months and another injury that lasted over 2 years.
     
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  17. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    You're a tough dude. Sounds like you were teeter tottering on the verge and your personality made the decision. Been there.

    I've been blessed to have never had to retire. Closest I came was in a tournament where I was playing singles and doubles. My shoulder had been bugging me for a little while, but my GP doc told me it was just tendinitis and to let pain be my guide. Doctors shouldn't be able to say that to a guy.

    Ended up having a torn labrum and rotator cuff. My second round singles match was a long 3 setter. Midway through the second set I was no longer able to serve overhand and had to spin me in underhanded. I lost. My doubles partner had traveled from out of state so I kept playing doubles too.

    An MRI later at the request of the ortho, I found myself scheduled for surgery. 6 months on the shelf taught me what the point was that I should have stopped...about a month before that tournament.
     
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  18. Herdsman76

    Herdsman76 Rookie

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    I can certainly relate to where you are coming from. In a recent match, I was leading 6-3, 5-4 with a break in hand. I started having severe leg cramps and I was at the point where I couldn't even move. I even told my opponent that if we split sets, he would get the win. I ended up winning 6-3, 7-5 but looking back it wasn't worth it for a couple of reasons. It was a consolation match in a tounament and two, I had to stay at the tennis club for almost 5 hours after the match because I couldn't drive myself home.

    Although I didn't retire from this match, I should have done so early. I do tend to retire at the first signs of trouble but didn't in this case because the match was almost over. In hindsight, I should have listened to my body...

    H76
     
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  19. PowerPlay

    PowerPlay Rookie

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    If I am winning or close to winning and have an injury that I think will prevent me from playing well in the next round (seeing as how the next round is usually a few hours later), then I usually retire. It's not fair to my opponent, in my opinion, to risk having to forfeit my next round while he could play uninjured. If I am losing or close to losing and have an injury, I retire. At this point in my life, it's not worth risking permanent injury just to finish a 4.5 match.
     
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  20. Loose Cannon

    Loose Cannon Rookie

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    Never have....never would.......



    Played a dubs match with an unplayable wrist.......

    Lost 1-2


    Found out later I had ton ligament in my wrist.....so in hindsight.....not a wise choice
     
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  21. darrinbaker00

    darrinbaker00 Professional

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    At what point do you retire from a match? When you're down 0-6, 0-5, 0-40, of course. ;)
     
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  22. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    Jinxed myself by posting this. Tweaked my groin this morning down 2-6, 2-1. Opponent hit a couple drop shotsin a row and I couldn't even make an effort to get to them. Retired and did so cussing to myself for ever having posted that I had never retired.
     
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  23. Angle Queen

    Angle Queen Professional

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    I can't quite say never...but it's fairly close.

    When I was (very) pregnant with my second child, I fell in warm-ups for a "lunch" league match. It was an overhead, that was over my head, and, with my center-of-mass being all different...I back-pedaled and landed on my butt. But not before trying to break my fall with my "off" hand (because I was too busy tossing the racket aside with my other).

    You guessed it; that off-hand/wrist/arm hurt like the dickens. I couldn't toss the ball on serve much less use a 2HBH...but it was the last match of the season...and I knew we needed our "line." Also, I knew "I" was personally done after I walking off-court because my USTA captain had already said "no mas," my belly was too big.

    So...I pushed through, ran around every BH and chipped/sliced OHed the ones I couldn't. We did win. Even had our opponents try to get me for an "over the net" call -- really!?! -- aside from the fact that I started to hit the overhead just in front of the service line...my belly would have had to have been darn near touching the net for it to have transpired the way they claimed.

    But serious injury wasn't at stake here. And we had opponents ripe to be defeated. The "injury" wasn't aggravated by further play and the emotional high of winning something meaningful for the team made it hurt a whole lot less. That I couldn't really pick up my 2-yr old (with the left arm/hand) for weeks afterwards, well, I just blamed it on her future sibling.

    Yet the whole time, I'm rethinking the '06 AO Mauresmo-Henin final. Really, Justine? Unless you're puking on the court a la Pistol Pete...finish it out. Give your opponent a real moment of glory. But those are pros and we're amateurs and there's no real sense in "gutting" it out when not necessary.

    Retiring because you're losing? Bad form regardless of pro or recreational. But because you're injured, eh, I'm willing to let that fall off my radar screen altogether.

    sorry for the long story
     
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  24. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    I recently considered retiring from a doubles match. Twice this year, I have strained my hamstring during a match. At first it hurts, then it goes numb. Which means I cannot run at all. Not good.

    I considered retiring, but decided instead to keep playing but to make absolutely sure I didn't damage it further. I went to Octogenarian Mode. I stood right on the service line to receive. When serving, I walked to the service line, volleying as I went.

    We lost both matches, but I actually played very well and hit a lot of great shots. In the first match when this happened, we almost won. There's a lot to be said for a slow, methodical approach to taking the net.
     
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  25. anantak2k

    anantak2k Semi-Pro

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    Never retired. I keep going as long as I can sort of stand on the other side :p.
     
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  26. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    Ok, retired from this match and my opponent invited my wife and I to go bowling tonight. Threw straight down the alley off one leg and beat everyone. Talked smack the whole way. Totally worth the retirement.
     
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  27. tennisee

    tennisee Rookie

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    Yeah - not so sure about that. I was called on to fill in for an afternoon match to prevent a forfeit when I'd already played my morning match, and was slightly injured as well.

    I won the first set, and knew a long second set would injure me. So I played high risk "hit winner or hit it out" style to keep the points as short as I could in the second, knowing the third was a 10 pt TB and that was the best chance I had of getting some points for the team.

    As it went, I couldn't get the TB, but I just congratulated the winner and left it at that.

    I think the concept of "tanking" is not black and white, as when you're on the court hitting balls you have a chance to win, and the decision of which balls I will and won't chase (in my 50's with bad knees) is one I have to make all the time.
     
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  28. dizzlmcwizzl

    dizzlmcwizzl Hall of Fame

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    I have only had to retire from a match once ... I badly strained an oblique muscle on a serve attempt and could not hit a forehand or lift my arm above my nipple.

    But the funny story came when my opponent retired. We had played a contentious 1st set that he won in the tiebreak on a shot I felt was a very bad call. However it was 95+ that day and he wilted in the second set (6-0). So when it came time for the deciding set I insisted we play it out, he wanted to play a match tiebreak ... I told him I wanted to play it out because he had no hope in a full set, which he did not.

    I guess he got the last laugh because he retired at 0-5, love-40
     
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  29. burosky

    burosky Professional

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    I don't know how true but I heard that if it is a muscle related injury, you may continue to play as long as you can bear it because it wouldn't get worse. However, if it was a joint related injury, you should stop playing because you can aggravate the injury. I wonder if we have any doctors in the house who can confirm.
     
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  30. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    I will never understand this, but I suppose I should not comment on it.
     
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  31. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    I would think that cartiledge damage is the type that you play through since blood doesn't go into cartiledge. Muscles, ligaments, and tendons require blood so they will swell.

    But, who can ever self-diagnose a cartiledge injury?
     
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