What was the last movie you watched?

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by jamesblakefan#1, Mar 22, 2010.

  1. Bdarb

    Bdarb Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,536
    Location:
    New England
    haven't heard of it. Haven't seen something by them I didn't like though. Loved the newsroom.
     
  2. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Messages:
    39,652
    It was horrible. Thestory was a piece of satire. It was to make fun of Mitty. The genius of Thurber was to seamlessly transition the mundane to a place of fantasy on a dime. The movie was contrived, and ended up making Mitty an admirable man. That was not the point at all. The point was to delve into human psychology and make fun of how people fantasize about their abilities.
     
  3. Hood_Man

    Hood_Man Legend

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2009
    Messages:
    8,444
    Location:
    Wales
    The Railway Man, 12 Years a Slave, and American Hustle.


    ...I think after seeing 'Slave I'll need to go and see Frozen again, just to remember what happiness feels like...
     
  4. Crisstti

    Crisstti Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Messages:
    7,347
    Location:
    Chile
    Is it based on a real story?, anyone knows?. Been wanting to see it but it seems to have come and gone from theaters here without me even noticing... unless it still hasn't arrived? :-?
     
  5. magnut

    magnut Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Messages:
    2,737
    macgruber was cracking me up last night and i dont like comedies at all. That may be the funniest movie i have ever seen.
     
  6. Crisstti

    Crisstti Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Messages:
    7,347
    Location:
    Chile
    Was loving that one too, but could never remember when it was on... HBO series should be on Netflix.

    I cannot say there's one show of them I didn't think was good, but some go overboard with the violence imo (Rome, Game of Thrones).

    LOVED Six feet under and Curb your enthusiasm.
     
  7. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    oh, i thought you were referring to the documentary Sole Survivor. I see you have edited.

    I saw Lone Survivor last week. It has a lot of action, lots of shooting. Not much more to offer, the characters are not developed. Personally, i felt the movie offers nothing over all the other hundreds of war or operation this or that movies.
     
  8. NonP

    NonP Professional

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2009
    Messages:
    1,496
    Eastwood's Letters from Iwo Jima is a fine war movie, told for once from a Japanese perspective.
     
  9. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    Carlito's Way - Pacino and Penn. Liked it a lot.

    It's criminal how gangstas have to die in the end, esp when played by DeNiro or Pacino. I was rooting for Carlito !

    Pacino is amazing both as a cop in Serpico or Heat and as a baddie in Carlito and Scarface.
     
  10. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    I downloaded both this and it's predecessor last week. Have you seen the first one of the two ? Flags of our Fathers.
     
  11. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    Slave is based on a book by the the same name. In case you see it, you might check out The Butler.
     
  12. Forehand Of Doom

    Forehand Of Doom Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2013
    Messages:
    3,834
    Location:
    Wheelchair Of Doom
    Brian de Palma p!sses me off sometimes. He is obviously a great director as Carlito's Way proves, but he is so uneven.

    I haven't watched CW in a while. If I remember correctly Sean Penn turned in a great performance as the Jewish lawyer that goes corrupt and ends up paying the price.
     
  13. NonP

    NonP Professional

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2009
    Messages:
    1,496
    Afraid not, and it's been on my to-do list forever. I can tell you that Flags wasn't as well received as Letters, and it's told from the typical American viewpoint so probably not as interesting but still worth watching before its Japanese counterpart.

    Maybe I'm pointing out the obvious since you seem to be a movie buff, but just in case a couple more recommendations:

    Grand Illusion - Probably Renoir's most sweeping humanistic statement, and for my money superior to his overrated Rules of the Game. Jean Gabin is great as usual.

    Fires on the Plain - Kon Ichikawa paints a desolate picture where the ordinary is turned into extraordinary barbarity. This was by no means the first attempt to depict man as a savage, but few have inspired such terror. The still underappreciated Ichikawa's masterpiece, and to be viewed before the overwrought Burmese Harp, his other acclaimed war film. (I'm also partial to his Makioka Sisters. Beautiful cinematography.)

    Rome, Open City - The film that jump-started Italian neorealism. It's not without flaws (for one thing it features a Gestapo lezbo hoodwinking the protagonist's ex!), but its "documentary" camerawork remains startling and its melodrama continues to stir. Pina (Anna Magnani) running after her fiance before being gunned down by the Nazis is one of my favorite scenes in cinema, but Magnani's my absolute favorite thespian ever, man or woman, so I'm naturally biased. :) (Incidentally Anna also starred in my favorite Renoir movie, The Golden Coach.)

    Hope you find this list helpful.
     
  14. Bdarb

    Bdarb Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,536
    Location:
    New England
    you can stream it at solarmovie.eu (google it, something like that) and just about anything else you can think of for that matter.

    Game of Thrones was addicting, quite violent but if you didn't read the books, that show had some of the best twists in tv like ever.

    shotime is good too, if you haven't watched the wire, I don't know what youre doing.
     
  15. Crisstti

    Crisstti Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Messages:
    7,347
    Location:
    Chile
    Spoilers guys! :neutral:
    After what FOD posted though, I think I've seen this movie after all. I do remember Penn's character (didn't notice it was him until the very end, he looked so different). Don't remember much else about the movie though.

    Will do :)
    It's always amazed me how few movies about slavery/abolition there are.
     
  16. Crisstti

    Crisstti Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Messages:
    7,347
    Location:
    Chile
    The violence in GOT was off putting for me, but I might give it another shot.

    I did watch a season of The Wire, but then it was over lol.

    Shotime? :confused:
    Thanks for that link btw! Great! :)
     
  17. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    21,273
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    Sentinel please stop w/ spoilers. Even though Carlitos way is a classic and most have seen it, it's still not cool to post spoilers, and you continue to do it.
     
  18. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    I know about Iwo Jima because my cuz mentioned the two movies to me the other day when i told him I have been wanting to see Acopalypse Now for some time. I have downloaded both and am about to see them soon.

    Thanks for the other recommendations. I have Grand Illusion and The Golden Coach but not the others. Oh, wait, I did see The Golden Coach a month back.

    Iirc, Rome Open City is by Rosselini - I have seen his movie on Saint Francis. I'll check out these recommendations asap. Thanks.
    I started seeing movies only a year back or maybe even less, so I am behind all of you there. Recommendations are always welcome. I try to see one movie every night, so i post here often :)
     
  19. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    My sincerest apologies, Sir. I did not say anything about Carlito's Way. I was talking about gangster movies in general, due to various movie codes the gangster has to be taken in or killed in the end. And Carlito was reformed, besides.
     
  20. Bdarb

    Bdarb Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,536
    Location:
    New England
    Shotime is like hbo just a different network. They did the show weeds for example.

    As for got, I thought it was violent and more so than things I watch, but it wasn't senseless. Seemed appropriate to the 'time period' do it was alright. That being said, after the last finale with the massacre.. I didn't watch for a long time after. Really brutal..
     
  21. Crisstti

    Crisstti Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Messages:
    7,347
    Location:
    Chile
    One every night! :shock: you're really trying to catch up! :)

    I watched the long version (director's cut I guess) of Apocalypse Now, and found it was just too long lol. So I'd recommend you watch the theatrical version.

    Since we were discussion TV series, might I recommend Twin Peaks, by Lynch. Brilliant, though it creeped the hell out of me lol
     
  22. BHBeguile

    BHBeguile Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2013
    Messages:
    368
    The book is Solomon Northup's memoirs and yes, it was all true.
     
  23. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    16,586
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2014
  24. Crisstti

    Crisstti Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Messages:
    7,347
    Location:
    Chile
    Oh, we don't get it here, had never heard of it :)

    I have a high tolerance for violence in dramas, but not really when it comes to other genres...
     
  25. Bobby Jr

    Bobby Jr Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    Messages:
    8,278
    The Book Thief

    This is a very nice movie. I've heard the book is fantastic but haven't read it yet. I wont be surprised if the movie is nominated for some awards.
     
  26. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    I saw the earlier version of Scarface (1932) with Paul Muni. However, found it quite slow, perhaps since I've just seen the 1983 version.
     
  27. NonP

    NonP Professional

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2009
    Messages:
    1,496
    No problem, and yes, Open City is indeed by Rossellini. That movie of his on St. Francis is another one on my to-do list. Like you I try to keep up with movies (not to mention other media) regularly, but life doesn't make it easy. :)

    If you liked The Golden Coach you'll probably also enjoy Children of Paradise, which plays on a similar conceit of life vis-a-vis theatre though with more cynical (and of course tragic) overtones. Marcel Carne's masterpiece may well be the most romantic movie ever, and another one of my all-time favorites.

    Speaking of which here are a few more of my desert-island films:

    2001: A Space Odyssey (yes, that one) - Kubrick
    Day of Wrath and Vampyr - Dreyer
    An Autumn Afternoon, Late Spring, Floating Weeds, and Equinox Flower - Ozu (my all-time favorite director)
    Ran and Ikiru - Kurosawa
    Kuroneko - Kaneto Shindo

    And there are a few popcorn flicks I love as much as the next guy. I'd love to chat about these more when I have time. Besides I'm guessing you already have too much on your plate right now anyway. :)

    Enjoy.
     
  28. Elite

    Elite Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2013
    Messages:
    652
    A few of my latest viewings:

    Letters from an Unknown Woman (1948, Max Ophüls)

    Without trying to sound doltish or ignorant, this film seems to be riddled with one drawback which has proven to be imperative in regards to my personal aversion towards American films from this particular time period. That being, its melodramatic and seemingly empty nature. Its apparent allure, non-existent; its story, largely uninviting and boring. It was only through Ophüls's confident direction, which seemed to manifest in his atheistic eye for striking photography, that proved to be the films' only main strength. Perhaps if given the chance to view this through a more sanguine lens, Letters from an Unknown Woman only further solidifies Ophüls as a doyen for the moving camera, the tracking camera - a man who knows full well how to construct the orgasmic cinematic shot. Aside from its technical beauties, a fairly blunt viewing. Maybe a 4.5 or 5.

    The Spirit of the Beehive (1973, Víctor Erice)

    Víctor Erice's imaginative piece is one of tranquility and minimalism. A very quiet and gradual observation into a desolate and remote Spanish village, yet to feel the outcomes and repercussions of a dividing civil war. This is story that is told primarily through images, often expressing its notions without the need for discourse, the need for a conventional narrative framework. This is purely visual storytelling, boasting a very warm, almost vibrant hue, both fitting and appealing to the naked eye. Perhaps my main problem, however, was its seemingly wandering nature, telling a fascinating story, but doing so somewhat aimlessly, eventually ending on a rather empty and underwhelming note. It's intelligent filmmaking, maybe too much to grasp in one viewing. The film does, in spite of this, posses some inherent appeal, and it is a fairly endearing (yet strangely discomfiting) viewing. It's one of those films that stays on your mind, but you are not quite sure why. I think a 6.5 seems fitting. Definitely open for future rewatches.

    Viridiana (1961, Luis Buñuel)

    Cynical, sardonic, and very sneering, this can best be described as a lampoonist tale, that seems to show very little faith when it comes to attaining the smallest degrees of gaiety and contentment in our society. Buñuel seems to make a deliberately diverging film; its opening half solemn and tragic, its closing, jocular and satirical. It was perhaps this discernible contrast that slightly damaged the drift of the film, as emphasis seemed to change almost promptly (and, frankly, for the worst), but that doesn't mean its latter half was unsatisfactory, per-se. It seemed to have boasted the scornful side of Buñuel, and that is always fun to see, even if it did prove inferior to its impeccable opening 40 minutes. The film offers no real answers to the question it raises. It is not supposed to. It derides the principles of Catholicism and organised religion in general, highlighting its hypocrisies and even absurdities, not a particularly uncommon trait in Buñuel's work. Ultimately, a very good film a bit shy away from greatness. I think a 7.5 or maybe an 8 works here.
     
  29. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    Did you know that Viridiana and Beehive are on Roger Ebert's Greatest Movie list. I don't know whether you check out his reviews or what you think of him, but if you haven't you can see his reviews.

    I've seen Beehive and enjoyed it. I have Viridiana with me, and hope to get around to it and Bunuel's other works some day.
     
  30. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    I have almost all of Ozu with me, and must go on a binge soon. My Japanese collection is collecting bitrust. I loved Ikiru. IIRC, Ran was based on Macbeth. I've seen and enjoyed many of Kurosawa's works. MikeB suggested some of his police procedurals which i also enjoyed, esp High and Low.
    I'll keep an eye out for Kuroneko. I have a copy of 2001 on every drive of mine, plus on almost every format it was sold on (VHS, CD, DVD etc).
     
  31. NonP

    NonP Professional

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2009
    Messages:
    1,496
    It's really hard to pick a single Ozu favorite. As you may already know nearly all of his films concern the family, ostensibly variations on the same theme of marriage and relationships.

    But they're deceptively simple, because nobody does more with less than Ozu, who's almost certainly the gentlest, least pretentious director in history. Even relatively minor works of his like The Flavor of Green Tea over Rice and An Inn in Tokyo have much to recommend them. In fact I've yet to see an Ozu movie I didn't like, which can't be said of any other director (not even Kurosawa who I consider the greatest of all filmmakers).

    Speaking of whom no arthouse director probably made more accessible and wide-ranging movies than Kurosawa. If you liked High and Low you'll also enjoy Drunken Angel and Stray Dog (if you haven't already).

    And for the record Ran is actually a loose adaptation of King Lear. Kurosawa did do a Macbeth film titled Throne of Blood. Both are first-rate Shakespeare adaptations, especially Ran which I rate at the very top and in fact agree with the director himself is his best work. (When asked which one of his movies he considered his best Kurosawa would always respond, "My next one." Reportedly that stopped after Ran.)

    But it's a close ball for me between Ran and Ikiru. The latter borders on melodrama at times, but it's probably the one Kurosawa movie I'd preserve over all the others, while the former can be easier to admire than to love. Anyway not to be missed in Ran: Mieko Harada as the vengeful Lady Kaede, arguably the most diabolical villian(ess) in cinema history, and Toru Takemitsu's evocative Mahler-inspired score.

    Kuroneko is a horror story, but that's like saying Dreyer's Vampyr is a vampire movie--neither term doesn't begin to do the movie justice. Like the Dreyer Shindo's Kuroneko is technically stunning, a 90 minute-long reverie with shimmering haze and atmosphere. And it's strangely seductive when it should be spooky. It's a horror film like no other, and one I hope will gain more traction in the future. See for yourself, and if you like Kuroneko you'll probably also dig the same director's Onibaba.

    There's nothing I can add about 2001 that hasn't been said. Besides something tells me you're more familiar with it than me. :)
     
  32. Forehand Of Doom

    Forehand Of Doom Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2013
    Messages:
    3,834
    Location:
    Wheelchair Of Doom
    Bunuel has a lot of religious and cultural baggage. He also uses a lot of symbolism in his movies. I'm just saying this so that you will be prepared to keep your mind open when you get around to watching his movies. Viridiana's religious symbolism is famous (no spoilers).
     
  33. Forehand Of Doom

    Forehand Of Doom Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2013
    Messages:
    3,834
    Location:
    Wheelchair Of Doom
    Thank you for your recommendations on Japanese cinema. I will make it a point to become acquainted with it. So far the only Japanese film I have seen is one of Nagisa Oshima's (sp?) works. ;)
     
  34. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    Her (2013) - Interesting.

    Has anyone else seen this ? I am afraid of saying much lest I be accused of spoiling.

    ----
    ^ NonP, Yes, I meant Throne of Blood, not Ran. I have yet to see Ran.

    And i have seen Stray Dog (also recommended by Mike B after I liked High and Low, but not Drunken Angel).

    I agree about your comment about Ikiru, but i did love how the old man puts aside his ego in the end completely to achieve what he wanted to. It is rare to see that kind of thing in movies or even in real life.

    I am downloading Kuroneko ( but it's a slow torrent that has been stuck for long ).
     
  35. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    21,273
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    Sentinel i am going to watch it. At least i keep telling myself to. Is it one of those movies that needs to be seen without discussion because by spoiling, i just meant stop talking about twists and stuff that happens in the end. :) lol
     
  36. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    There are no twists and turns. And nothing happens in the end. And no, you can discuss the movie without it spoiling.

    hehe, j/k don't take the above to be spoilers :)
     
  37. Elite

    Elite Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2013
    Messages:
    652
    I don't really follow Ebert that much, honestly, but they are generally considered to be masterpieces in world cinema, so I am not surprised. I see you are getting into some more Japanese cinema - please seek the works of Mizoguchi if you haven't already.
     
  38. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    I love Mizoguchi. I have eight of his films. I loved Sansho The Bailiff and Ugetsu.
     
  39. Blitzball

    Blitzball Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2012
    Messages:
    772
    Location:
    Arizona
    I did see Her, last night actually. I thought it was a fantastic watch. Joaquin Phoenix completely embodied his role, and there is so much to talk about I don't even know where to begin.

    I think this film has a lot to say about our attachments to technology and how it can isolate us and disrupt human interaction. And I also think Spike Jonze communicated well that we can find joy if we remain true to ourselves and others (like how *spoiler alert* Theodore rather boldly admits to others he is dating an OS). There's a multitudes of themes that are still beyond me though-- I'd like to hear what you think Sentinel.
     
  40. Hood_Man

    Hood_Man Legend

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2009
    Messages:
    8,444
    Location:
    Wales
    It was only released recently in the UK so perhaps it's not arrived with you yet, and yes, unfortunately, it's a true story (based on the memoirs of the real life Solomon Northup).

    It's absolutely brutal, too. I'd never be so arrogant as to claim to know how those poor people felt, but after seeing this I think, for the first time, I can say that I have a very real idea of what life must have been like.

    I've read about slavery, I've heard real life accounts, and I've seen films about them too, but they've never shown it in so much gory detail as 'Slave did.
     
  41. Backbored

    Backbored Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Messages:
    2,081
    Location:
    Mallorn trees of Lothlorien.
    The Swedish film miniseries of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, which consist of all three books in a six part series. It was great. I’ve seen this twice, once with the subtitles in English, and once with the English voice overs.

    The actress Noomi Rapace (you may have seen her in Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows and Prometheus) is the epitome of Lisbeth Salander from the books. She conveys so much of the personality of Lisbeth with just the looks she gives.

    I’m not sure if this was on TV in Sweden given the hard core S&V but as in The Game of Thrones this is not for the faint of heart.
    [​IMG]
     
  42. Crisstti

    Crisstti Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Messages:
    7,347
    Location:
    Chile
    Yeah, just heard it hasn't arrived here yet. They're waiting for the Oscars apparently.
    How good did you think the movie itself was, beyond the subject matter?.

    I'd be very interested in reading the book...

    (Possible minor spoiler)
    Apparently free black people being kidnapped and sold into slavery wasn't exactly uncommon.
     
  43. Crisstti

    Crisstti Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Messages:
    7,347
    Location:
    Chile
    BTW, just saw Django Unchained last night, and thought it was good, though not particularly so... seemed to me they could have made one feel a bit more involved with the story, I don't know.

    But it was good.
     
  44. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    Le Cercle Rouge (1970) by Jean-Paul Melville. Very interesting and taut heist movie with a 30-minute heist sequence shown in great detail and almost totally silent (remember Rififi ?).
     
  45. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    Ascenseur pour l'échafaud (1959, Louis Malle). aka Elevator to the Gallows, Lift to the Scaffold.

    Malle's first. Very interesting. iirc, there is someone here who is a big Malle fan. Too lazy to search through the thread. Okay found it ...

    What about Atlantic City ? My bro says it's one of his fave movies.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2014
  46. Midaso240

    Midaso240 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2013
    Messages:
    2,319
    I saw it once,and thought it was great. Would recommend.
     
  47. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    Dallas Buyers Club - Best pic nominee. Matthew really looks like a skeleton in this.

    Anyone else seen it ?
     
  48. quest01

    quest01 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2006
    Messages:
    4,624
    Just watched The Last Stand on Netflix.
     
  49. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    Captain Phillips - Intense. Interesting, but nothing great imo.

    Good performances by Tom Hanks and Abdi. Various Oscar nominations incl Best Picture.

    A real life story of a cargo ship hijacked by Somali pirates.
     
  50. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    38,485
    Location:
    Stronk Era
    Saw Kuroneko last night. Lovely, touching movie. I almost thought it was going to be one of those slasher/gory movies like Audition and was having second thoughts about seeing it. Thanks for the recommendation.

    I did start by seeing about 10 minutes of Inside Llewyn Davis but could not "connect". Will try again later.

    Has anyone here seen Hanna Arendt ?

     

Share This Page