What was the last movie you watched?

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by jamesblakefan#1, Mar 22, 2010.

  1. Crisstti

    Crisstti Legend

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    One every night! :shock: you're really trying to catch up! :)

    I watched the long version (director's cut I guess) of Apocalypse Now, and found it was just too long lol. So I'd recommend you watch the theatrical version.

    Since we were discussion TV series, might I recommend Twin Peaks, by Lynch. Brilliant, though it creeped the hell out of me lol
     
  2. BHBeguile

    BHBeguile Rookie

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    The book is Solomon Northup's memoirs and yes, it was all true.
     
  3. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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  4. Crisstti

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    Oh, we don't get it here, had never heard of it :)

    I have a high tolerance for violence in dramas, but not really when it comes to other genres...
     
  5. Bobby Jr

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    The Book Thief

    This is a very nice movie. I've heard the book is fantastic but haven't read it yet. I wont be surprised if the movie is nominated for some awards.
     
  6. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    I saw the earlier version of Scarface (1932) with Paul Muni. However, found it quite slow, perhaps since I've just seen the 1983 version.
     
  7. NonP

    NonP Professional

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    No problem, and yes, Open City is indeed by Rossellini. That movie of his on St. Francis is another one on my to-do list. Like you I try to keep up with movies (not to mention other media) regularly, but life doesn't make it easy. :)

    If you liked The Golden Coach you'll probably also enjoy Children of Paradise, which plays on a similar conceit of life vis-a-vis theatre though with more cynical (and of course tragic) overtones. Marcel Carne's masterpiece may well be the most romantic movie ever, and another one of my all-time favorites.

    Speaking of which here are a few more of my desert-island films:

    2001: A Space Odyssey (yes, that one) - Kubrick
    Day of Wrath and Vampyr - Dreyer
    An Autumn Afternoon, Late Spring, Floating Weeds, and Equinox Flower - Ozu (my all-time favorite director)
    Ran and Ikiru - Kurosawa
    Kuroneko - Kaneto Shindo

    And there are a few popcorn flicks I love as much as the next guy. I'd love to chat about these more when I have time. Besides I'm guessing you already have too much on your plate right now anyway. :)

    Enjoy.
     
  8. Elite

    Elite Semi-Pro

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    A few of my latest viewings:

    Letters from an Unknown Woman (1948, Max Ophüls)

    Without trying to sound doltish or ignorant, this film seems to be riddled with one drawback which has proven to be imperative in regards to my personal aversion towards American films from this particular time period. That being, its melodramatic and seemingly empty nature. Its apparent allure, non-existent; its story, largely uninviting and boring. It was only through Ophüls's confident direction, which seemed to manifest in his atheistic eye for striking photography, that proved to be the films' only main strength. Perhaps if given the chance to view this through a more sanguine lens, Letters from an Unknown Woman only further solidifies Ophüls as a doyen for the moving camera, the tracking camera - a man who knows full well how to construct the orgasmic cinematic shot. Aside from its technical beauties, a fairly blunt viewing. Maybe a 4.5 or 5.

    The Spirit of the Beehive (1973, Víctor Erice)

    Víctor Erice's imaginative piece is one of tranquility and minimalism. A very quiet and gradual observation into a desolate and remote Spanish village, yet to feel the outcomes and repercussions of a dividing civil war. This is story that is told primarily through images, often expressing its notions without the need for discourse, the need for a conventional narrative framework. This is purely visual storytelling, boasting a very warm, almost vibrant hue, both fitting and appealing to the naked eye. Perhaps my main problem, however, was its seemingly wandering nature, telling a fascinating story, but doing so somewhat aimlessly, eventually ending on a rather empty and underwhelming note. It's intelligent filmmaking, maybe too much to grasp in one viewing. The film does, in spite of this, posses some inherent appeal, and it is a fairly endearing (yet strangely discomfiting) viewing. It's one of those films that stays on your mind, but you are not quite sure why. I think a 6.5 seems fitting. Definitely open for future rewatches.

    Viridiana (1961, Luis Buñuel)

    Cynical, sardonic, and very sneering, this can best be described as a lampoonist tale, that seems to show very little faith when it comes to attaining the smallest degrees of gaiety and contentment in our society. Buñuel seems to make a deliberately diverging film; its opening half solemn and tragic, its closing, jocular and satirical. It was perhaps this discernible contrast that slightly damaged the drift of the film, as emphasis seemed to change almost promptly (and, frankly, for the worst), but that doesn't mean its latter half was unsatisfactory, per-se. It seemed to have boasted the scornful side of Buñuel, and that is always fun to see, even if it did prove inferior to its impeccable opening 40 minutes. The film offers no real answers to the question it raises. It is not supposed to. It derides the principles of Catholicism and organised religion in general, highlighting its hypocrisies and even absurdities, not a particularly uncommon trait in Buñuel's work. Ultimately, a very good film a bit shy away from greatness. I think a 7.5 or maybe an 8 works here.
     
  9. Sentinel

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    Did you know that Viridiana and Beehive are on Roger Ebert's Greatest Movie list. I don't know whether you check out his reviews or what you think of him, but if you haven't you can see his reviews.

    I've seen Beehive and enjoyed it. I have Viridiana with me, and hope to get around to it and Bunuel's other works some day.
     
  10. Sentinel

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    I have almost all of Ozu with me, and must go on a binge soon. My Japanese collection is collecting bitrust. I loved Ikiru. IIRC, Ran was based on Macbeth. I've seen and enjoyed many of Kurosawa's works. MikeB suggested some of his police procedurals which i also enjoyed, esp High and Low.
    I'll keep an eye out for Kuroneko. I have a copy of 2001 on every drive of mine, plus on almost every format it was sold on (VHS, CD, DVD etc).
     
  11. NonP

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    It's really hard to pick a single Ozu favorite. As you may already know nearly all of his films concern the family, ostensibly variations on the same theme of marriage and relationships.

    But they're deceptively simple, because nobody does more with less than Ozu, who's almost certainly the gentlest, least pretentious director in history. Even relatively minor works of his like The Flavor of Green Tea over Rice and An Inn in Tokyo have much to recommend them. In fact I've yet to see an Ozu movie I didn't like, which can't be said of any other director (not even Kurosawa who I consider the greatest of all filmmakers).

    Speaking of whom no arthouse director probably made more accessible and wide-ranging movies than Kurosawa. If you liked High and Low you'll also enjoy Drunken Angel and Stray Dog (if you haven't already).

    And for the record Ran is actually a loose adaptation of King Lear. Kurosawa did do a Macbeth film titled Throne of Blood. Both are first-rate Shakespeare adaptations, especially Ran which I rate at the very top and in fact agree with the director himself is his best work. (When asked which one of his movies he considered his best Kurosawa would always respond, "My next one." Reportedly that stopped after Ran.)

    But it's a close ball for me between Ran and Ikiru. The latter borders on melodrama at times, but it's probably the one Kurosawa movie I'd preserve over all the others, while the former can be easier to admire than to love. Anyway not to be missed in Ran: Mieko Harada as the vengeful Lady Kaede, arguably the most diabolical villian(ess) in cinema history, and Toru Takemitsu's evocative Mahler-inspired score.

    Kuroneko is a horror story, but that's like saying Dreyer's Vampyr is a vampire movie--neither term doesn't begin to do the movie justice. Like the Dreyer Shindo's Kuroneko is technically stunning, a 90 minute-long reverie with shimmering haze and atmosphere. And it's strangely seductive when it should be spooky. It's a horror film like no other, and one I hope will gain more traction in the future. See for yourself, and if you like Kuroneko you'll probably also dig the same director's Onibaba.

    There's nothing I can add about 2001 that hasn't been said. Besides something tells me you're more familiar with it than me. :)
     
  12. Forehand Of Doom

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    Bunuel has a lot of religious and cultural baggage. He also uses a lot of symbolism in his movies. I'm just saying this so that you will be prepared to keep your mind open when you get around to watching his movies. Viridiana's religious symbolism is famous (no spoilers).
     
  13. Forehand Of Doom

    Forehand Of Doom Banned

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    Thank you for your recommendations on Japanese cinema. I will make it a point to become acquainted with it. So far the only Japanese film I have seen is one of Nagisa Oshima's (sp?) works. ;)
     
  14. Sentinel

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    Her (2013) - Interesting.

    Has anyone else seen this ? I am afraid of saying much lest I be accused of spoiling.

    ----
    ^ NonP, Yes, I meant Throne of Blood, not Ran. I have yet to see Ran.

    And i have seen Stray Dog (also recommended by Mike B after I liked High and Low, but not Drunken Angel).

    I agree about your comment about Ikiru, but i did love how the old man puts aside his ego in the end completely to achieve what he wanted to. It is rare to see that kind of thing in movies or even in real life.

    I am downloading Kuroneko ( but it's a slow torrent that has been stuck for long ).
     
  15. Power Player

    Power Player G.O.A.T.

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    Sentinel i am going to watch it. At least i keep telling myself to. Is it one of those movies that needs to be seen without discussion because by spoiling, i just meant stop talking about twists and stuff that happens in the end. :) lol
     
  16. Sentinel

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    There are no twists and turns. And nothing happens in the end. And no, you can discuss the movie without it spoiling.

    hehe, j/k don't take the above to be spoilers :)
     
  17. Elite

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    I don't really follow Ebert that much, honestly, but they are generally considered to be masterpieces in world cinema, so I am not surprised. I see you are getting into some more Japanese cinema - please seek the works of Mizoguchi if you haven't already.
     
  18. Sentinel

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    I love Mizoguchi. I have eight of his films. I loved Sansho The Bailiff and Ugetsu.
     
  19. Blitzball

    Blitzball Semi-Pro

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    I did see Her, last night actually. I thought it was a fantastic watch. Joaquin Phoenix completely embodied his role, and there is so much to talk about I don't even know where to begin.

    I think this film has a lot to say about our attachments to technology and how it can isolate us and disrupt human interaction. And I also think Spike Jonze communicated well that we can find joy if we remain true to ourselves and others (like how *spoiler alert* Theodore rather boldly admits to others he is dating an OS). There's a multitudes of themes that are still beyond me though-- I'd like to hear what you think Sentinel.
     
  20. Hood_Man

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    It was only released recently in the UK so perhaps it's not arrived with you yet, and yes, unfortunately, it's a true story (based on the memoirs of the real life Solomon Northup).

    It's absolutely brutal, too. I'd never be so arrogant as to claim to know how those poor people felt, but after seeing this I think, for the first time, I can say that I have a very real idea of what life must have been like.

    I've read about slavery, I've heard real life accounts, and I've seen films about them too, but they've never shown it in so much gory detail as 'Slave did.
     
  21. Backbored

    Backbored Hall of Fame

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    The Swedish film miniseries of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, which consist of all three books in a six part series. It was great. I’ve seen this twice, once with the subtitles in English, and once with the English voice overs.

    The actress Noomi Rapace (you may have seen her in Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows and Prometheus) is the epitome of Lisbeth Salander from the books. She conveys so much of the personality of Lisbeth with just the looks she gives.

    I’m not sure if this was on TV in Sweden given the hard core S&V but as in The Game of Thrones this is not for the faint of heart.
    [​IMG]
     
  22. Crisstti

    Crisstti Legend

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    Yeah, just heard it hasn't arrived here yet. They're waiting for the Oscars apparently.
    How good did you think the movie itself was, beyond the subject matter?.

    I'd be very interested in reading the book...

    (Possible minor spoiler)
    Apparently free black people being kidnapped and sold into slavery wasn't exactly uncommon.
     
  23. Crisstti

    Crisstti Legend

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    BTW, just saw Django Unchained last night, and thought it was good, though not particularly so... seemed to me they could have made one feel a bit more involved with the story, I don't know.

    But it was good.
     
  24. Sentinel

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    Le Cercle Rouge (1970) by Jean-Paul Melville. Very interesting and taut heist movie with a 30-minute heist sequence shown in great detail and almost totally silent (remember Rififi ?).
     
  25. Sentinel

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    Ascenseur pour l'échafaud (1959, Louis Malle). aka Elevator to the Gallows, Lift to the Scaffold.

    Malle's first. Very interesting. iirc, there is someone here who is a big Malle fan. Too lazy to search through the thread. Okay found it ...

    What about Atlantic City ? My bro says it's one of his fave movies.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2014
  26. Midaso240

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    I saw it once,and thought it was great. Would recommend.
     
  27. Sentinel

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    Dallas Buyers Club - Best pic nominee. Matthew really looks like a skeleton in this.

    Anyone else seen it ?
     
  28. quest01

    quest01 Hall of Fame

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    Just watched The Last Stand on Netflix.
     
  29. Sentinel

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    Captain Phillips - Intense. Interesting, but nothing great imo.

    Good performances by Tom Hanks and Abdi. Various Oscar nominations incl Best Picture.

    A real life story of a cargo ship hijacked by Somali pirates.
     
  30. Sentinel

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    Saw Kuroneko last night. Lovely, touching movie. I almost thought it was going to be one of those slasher/gory movies like Audition and was having second thoughts about seeing it. Thanks for the recommendation.

    I did start by seeing about 10 minutes of Inside Llewyn Davis but could not "connect". Will try again later.

    Has anyone here seen Hanna Arendt ?

     
  31. Sentinel

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    My Life to Live

    Elite, which is the pompous/overblown moment ? The one where she meets the philosopher. I was wondering that this is the only part in the film when she reveals a part of herself, her thoughts. And the scene in which she dances like a girl.
     
  32. ollinger

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    Her

    computers develop consciousness here, but this serves the film as a tool to reveal how humans project their emotions and needs onto their love objects. Well made and well worthwhile.
     
  33. Sentinel

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    Very insightful review of Forbidden Games. Beautiful movie. The innocence and purity of childhood in the face of war and bereavement.

    I am not sure what you refer to as the misplaced scene -- are you referring to the fight over the crosses? I thought it showed how adults are fighting over the very thing that has brought two children closer, how childish adults can be even in such hard circumstances.

    Brigette Fossey (Paulette) went on the act in several other movies and seems to have a good career. Georges Poujoly (Michel) played the small-time crook in Elevator to the Gallows and did some other small parts. He died of cancer at the age of 60.

    Rene Clement also directed Purple Noon (Plein Soleil) which I have on one drive. Guess I'll be seeing that soon.

    Spoilers
    :
    Michel sure is in for a good thrashing in the end. I am not sure what really happens in the end with Paulette? Does she land up going to a concentration camp or what ? She doesn't seem to be Christian (that is implied at least). Does adopting Michel's last name help him track her in some fictional future ? Does it save her from the camps ?
     
  34. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    All-Star Superman, only knew the comics, not the video.
     
  35. Sentinel

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    Le Grande Illusion - 1937 (Renoir) - Wonderful and very interesting, I will have to see it again to understand the social issues better.

    I hope to see Rules of the Game tonight. What other movies of Gabin have you liked ? (I have French Cancan with me, not yet seen). I also have your other recommendation, Fires on the Plain.

    Thanks.
     
  36. NonP

    NonP Professional

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    The late Ebert was decent, but I really can't say I've learned a lot from reading his stuff. His friend and colleague Jonathan Rosenbaum is a more insightful critic, and of course you can't talk about 20th-century film criticism without mentioning Pauline Kael. David Denby is perhaps Kael's most direct successor, the one who can (or could) strike the right balance between highfalutin obscurantism and insipid blurb PR.

    On the more theoretical (and foreign) side André Bazin is essential reading for just about every film student.

    Anytime. :) There are many more worthy Japanese directors (I hate the term "auteur") that I haven't mentioned. Others have already given a shout-out to Mizoguchi, another titan of Japanese cinema. To that I'll add Masaki Kobayashi, Hiroshi Teshigahara, Keisuke Kinoshita, Shohei Imamura, Masahiro Shinoda and Seijun Suzuki for starters. Also the Zatoichi series are great fun, most of the movies featuring Shintaro Katsu as the eponymous blind masseur/swordsman.

    And of course there's anime, with Miyazaki (the elder one, obviously) hovering over the competition.

    Then you'll also like the same director's Bob le flambeur (Bob the Gambler). You shouldn't expect edge-of-the-seat thrills because this is far from a standard heist movie (not that Le cercle rouge was either), but it's a very charming, almost nostalgic portrait of the City of Light and underground chivalry, thanks in no small part to the suave Roger Duchesne as the title protagonist.

    If you're looking for suspense then try The Wages of Fear by Henri-Georges Clouzot. Here Clouzot might well have surpassed the Master of Suspense himself (Hitchcock).

    No problem, glad you enjoyed them.

    As for Gabin's other movies, apart from French Cancan Renoir's La bête humaine is another one I can recall off the top of my head. Also Max Ophuls' Le plaisir, though he was only in one of the three parts (it's an omnibus film). But as you may know he was very prolific, these are by no means his only distinguished roles.
     
  37. Sentinel

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    ^ I do believe I've seen Wages of Fear a few years back. Is it the one with the long truck ride, and in the end the truck is coming down the mountain ...

    Bob Le Flambeur is very much on my high-priority list, and no ... i am not into edge-of-the-seat thrills. I have had enough. I like more relaxed movies like the ones you have mentioned.

    Thanks for mentioning the various critics. And the other movie recommendations.
     
  38. Sentinel

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    Enough Said (2013) - someone here recommended it but i can't find the post.

    Funny movie about divorced people, their affairs, their children. Laughed a lot.
     
  39. NonP

    NonP Professional

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    Yes, that's the one. Clouzot's suspense is not exactly of the edge-of-the-seat variety either, but rather sustained suspense. I really can't think of anyone else that did it so skillfully, again not even Hitchcock himself.

    And no problem about the tips. Glad to be of help.
     
  40. Sentinel

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    Miyazaki is the one who did Spirited Away and My Neighbour Totoro. There's another one I saw, Ponyo. Not sure if its Miyazaki too, but good.

    Loved them all. I'd love to watch Spirited Away again.

    Just checked .. all three are by him.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hayao_Miyazaki#Filmography
     
  41. Solo

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    Black Swan

    Surprised Natalie Portman was actually good in her performance considering she is a terrible actress.
     
  42. Vcore89

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    Crash (2004)!

    An ensemble of Don Cheadle, Thandie Newton, Sandra Bullock, Brendan Fraser, Terence Howard, Tony Danza, William Fichtner, Matt Dillon Shaun Toub, Jennifer Esposito, Ryan Philippe & of course Ludacris and many more that I fail to name on top of my head.

    Intertwining stories about racism, victimization, intinctive impulses, prejudices, resentments AND consequences. Also the nagging HMO issue (universal healthcare huh!).:cry:
     
  43. JackB1

    JackB1 G.O.A.T.

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    Saw and liked it a lot. Great flick.
     
  44. Sentinel

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    Bob Le Flambeur (Bob the Gambler/High Roller, 1955) d. by Jean-Pierre Melville.

    (NonP, I did also see Rules of the Game (Renoir). Sadly, I did not "get it". Either i lack knowledge of the context, or am too new to films. Seemed to become a bit of a comedy at the end).
     
  45. Midaso240

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    The Sting (1973). 8.5/10
     
  46. Solo

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    There will be blood: 8/10

    PTA and DDL is the perfect combo. Joaquin Phoenix can't be ruled out too with his work with PTA. Amazing actors and director.
     
  47. Sentinel

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    Le Samourai (1967 ) - Jean-Paul Melville. With Alain Delon as Jef Costello. Excellent film about a contract killer.
     
  48. Chuck

    Chuck New User

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    The Lone Ranger

    Yeah, I heard all the bad things about this film, but I really thought Armie Hammer and Johnny Depp would be enough to save it and make it worth watching....WRONG. This film is not the worst I've ever seen, but close. Do not waste your time.
    3/10
     
  49. quest01

    quest01 Hall of Fame

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    I saw Texas Chainsaw 2013 edition and it was pretty bad.
     
  50. Crisstti

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    So bad? :-?

    Still have to watch any movie with Depp in it :)
    Cannot be worse than the vampire one.
     

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