what would you do here regarding string a kmart racket?

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by Larrysümmers, Aug 13, 2010.

  1. Larrysümmers

    Larrysümmers Hall of Fame

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    so my friend plays with this 10 dollar kmart racket and he asked me to restring it...ive been told that since its so cheap i would have to string it really low. and that the grommets are really small and its hard to tie off.
    are these things true? should i just tell him to buy a new 10 special?
    thanks
     
    #1
  2. Radicalized

    Radicalized Semi-Pro

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    Not a pro stringer here but I dealt with this with a friend who bought clothing to match :rolleyes: the "low-end" racquet his brother had given him as a gift. He originally didn't know its value. He wanted to keep it. I restrung it with a cheap, thick synthetic like it had. I didn't have a problem. Tell him there could be stringing issues and it's his call, and if it comes to it, he gets another low-end racquet which isn't much more than most strings or the standard price of a string job. At worst, he would have had a useless "frame" anyway. I let my friend know that I usually only do racquets that are usually restrung, and I couldn't find specific information to show him on his one way or the other. Some discount retailers have racquets of varying quality, as far as I can tell, and people beat the heck out of them, and they last just fine. Playability is another issue.
     
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  3. Lakers4Life

    Lakers4Life Hall of Fame

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    I usually say, "It's cheaper to buy another racket than restring it", or turn away aluminum rackets because they are usually deformed.

    Though if you want something to practice on, go for it. You may have to do a one piece job as they don't usually have extra tie off holes.
     
    #3
  4. Larrysümmers

    Larrysümmers Hall of Fame

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    if i did redo it. what would be the max tension i should do?
     
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  5. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    Look up the specs on the racquet in question.
    Along with the string pattern, it lists the tension range recommended.
     
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  6. dancraig

    dancraig Hall of Fame

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    Count the strings, mains and crosses, before removing the strings. Check the tie offs and skips also.
    I have never found any stringing info on the cheap Walmart type frames. On the ones I have strung, anyway.
    I would just string it low, maybe 35-50 pounds.
    It can be done.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2010
    #6
  7. Radicalized

    Radicalized Semi-Pro

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    I have seen a cheap one with the tension range printed inside the yoke. Maybe you'll get lucky. Otherwise, low to mid 50s at most, depending on the head size and the string.
     
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  8. Virtua Tennis

    Virtua Tennis Semi-Pro

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    One thing about stringing these cheap crap make sure it sits in your machine properly otherwise don't string it. It will fold on you like a cheap suit.

    If it's dented don't do it. If it's slightly out of shape don't do it. If the aluminum walls of the frame is very thin don't do it above 50 pounds.

    After having one of these piece of junk fold on me I don't string aluminum frames anymore. I tell my customers it's really not worth my time and your money. If you break the string on a cheap racquet that tells me your playing more and that you need to upgrade to a better racquet.
     
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  9. wally

    wally Rookie

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    Here's what I do :

    1) Like the others have said - If its dented, deformed, or will not mount correctly in the machine. I'll tell the client - I won't gurantee the string job and if it bends, breaks etc.. you still have to pay for the string. I do the same thing with any damaged (expensive or not) racquet that a customer brings in for stringing.

    2.) Once peice at a good midrange tension 50-55 lbs

    3.) Your string job will be tons better that the OEM so don't fret the string choice too much. Any decent & inexpensive synthetic will do.

    4) I've done a number of these for school programs - they're not all horrible to restring

    Good luck
     
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  10. Donny0627

    Donny0627 Professional

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    I just strung a wwalmart racket at 58(practice)
     
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  11. kato669

    kato669 Rookie

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    I've stuck to 50-55 lbs on cheap beginner racquets. They are usually in the 98-110 sq.in. range so this works out well without the risk of cracking the frame. Forten nylon is what I usually use unless I have something cheaper in stock. Funny, alot of these have the word "titanium" all over the racquet. Have told people multiple times this ain't titanium but just cheap alumninum.
     
    #11
  12. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    its probably cheaper to buy a new one
     
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  13. rich s

    rich s Hall of Fame

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    what s/he said.......
     
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  14. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    ^^^ You guys are probably right but I wonder how many times you tell your customers it is cheaper to buy a stringer and do it yourself. Don't you think everyone knows that?

    Irvin
     
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  15. rich s

    rich s Hall of Fame

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    Never, because it's not cheaper to buy a stringer and do it yourself until you've recouped the cost of the stringer. Additionally the knowledge and skill required to string a racquet is not common.

    No, I don't think everyone knows ...... think about what you know, think about what you don't know...... what you know or is obvious to you is not necessarily known by or obvious to others and vice versa...... otherwise the OP's friend wouldn't be asking to have his $12 racquet strung with a $20 string job......

    respectfully.
    rich
     
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  16. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    So much philosophy, so early in the morning! :)
    Had a highly talented customer from South Africa who couldn't justify spending +$ on rackets. As such, he brought me rackets that couldn't have retailed for more than $20 MANY times for restringing...basic nylon, if you please. I don't think he changed from the 2 or 3 frames he had in rotation in the 3-4 years I handled his stringing. He just liked the play of a cheap aluminum stick. I would have taken him as a doubles partner any time, even with those rackets :) .

    On the other hand, while shopping for rackets to re-furbish and donate to a local tennis center neighborhood program, I came across a Head 'trisys pro XL' in new condition except for the broken strings. What a pain! The throat bridge isn't perfectly aligned with the hairpin and certainly doesn't want to hold position under stringing load(5-point mounting). I'll give it one more try while watching US Open recordings; but, in over thirty years of stringing, I've only had a half-dozen frames give me this much trouble. Cheaper to buy a new one to donate??? You bet! But, this is a challenge now!
     
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  17. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Yes there was a guy in the 70s that lost his sponsorship because he would not put down the T2000. He wasn't a bad player either.

    Irvin
     
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  18. rich s

    rich s Hall of Fame

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    I understand what you're saying and can understand the situation..... It sounds more like an exception than the rule..... I don't get that same feeling from the OP's post....... :)
     
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  19. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Agreed. BTW, do you know Irvin? Just wondering.
    And hey! How about those air quality warnings?!? We 'don't' miss those out here in the convection oven! I do miss Sandy Springs Tennis Center, however. :)
     
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  20. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    Coach, you sound like me. I'd look at the challenge. I think you could string them up to around 60, depending on the racket. How the throat piece aligns (as Rick mentioned) has a lot to do with how to string it. Coach, try taking an awl to line it up. Then tube the hole.
     
    #20
  21. rich s

    rich s Hall of Fame

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    Haven't had the pleasure of meeting Irvin yet..... although I do leave near Marietta.......

    I don't envy your convection oven......

    :)
     
    #21
  22. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Thanks, this one has the built-in vibra-doodle that has to be slud(my word) up the mains, out of the way, to mount securely. Even then, the throat bridge has very sharp edges where it meets the mounting stops...PITA, as they say. The hairpin still wants to breathe too much, no matter the mounting technique. I will NOT be defeated! Even if I am going to give this racket away! :)
     
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