Whats your top 10 of all time right now?

Discussion in 'Former Pro Player Talk' started by 90's Clay, Aug 22, 2012.

  1. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    macattack, Why Mac so high? Nomen est omen? McEnroe has won 15 majors (including "Masters" and WCT Finals). Rosewall has won 25 majors...

    Where is Pancho Gonzalez? Lost in history...
     
  2. macattack

    macattack Rookie

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    I love Pancho, but he does not make my top ten. To be honest I could have shuffled Agassi, McEnroe, Rosewall and Tilden in any order for the last four. I'm not as much of a stat hound as some on here are (nothing wrong with being obsessed with stats, though, of course). So this was more of a "feel" list for me. Off the top of my head, at a cocktail party, that's the list I'd throw out. It would probably get shuffled and changed a bit for 7-10 any day of the week.

    Also, great use of nomen est omen. You don't see a lot of Plautus references on the board. Haha. And yes, that probably had something to do with Mac above Rosewall.
     
  3. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    NatF, I just counted all players who have won a Grand Slam tournament (in singles) and who have lost at least once to Rosewall. I got to the huge number of 42 (plus 2 players who won pro majors, i. e. Segura and Buchholz). He never beat Drobny and Borg.

    Using your list of Federer's great victims Roger won against 19 such players. We don't know yet about future GS winners.

    I don't know how many great players Gonzalez won but (after a short examination) I believe they are about 30 GS winners and 2 Pro majors winners (again Segura and Buchholz).

    That way, Rosewall seems to be the most successful male player regarding beating winners of majors. It's the first time I realized that so clearly...
     
  4. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    Mac, Thanks. Did not know that this Latin term was created by Plautus.

    Ceterum censeo: Pancho Gonzalez should be included in the top ten (without pushing out both Tilden and Rosewall). Pancho was the hell of a player and greater than Agassi!
     
  5. macattack

    macattack Rookie

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    Fair enough! He just doesn't make my top ten list. Top 15 for sure, though. I do have a ton of respect for him as a player. You're really testing my latin! I'm very rusty. Haven't flexed those muscles since grad school!
     
  6. Dan Lobb

    Dan Lobb Hall of Fame

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    That is a very subjective opinion...most commentators accept the amateur slams of Tilden, Lacoste, Vines, Crawford, Perry, Kramer, Schroeder, Riggs, Gonzales, Hoad, Laver as being of some significance, and your blanket dismissal of them all is rather strange.
     
  7. Dan Lobb

    Dan Lobb Hall of Fame

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    Yes, I noticed that, but the words are so appropriate to our theme, I could not ignore the application.
     
  8. NatF

    NatF Talk Tennis Guru

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    I'm not sure why this is significant? Consider that due to the amateur and pro split there were 7 'majors' to compete in not just 4, not to mention many of those amateur winners would not have been slam winners in an Open Era. It seems you are omitting just those that won pro majors, however the split still means it was easier to win a major back then. Not to mention Federer-Nadal-Djokovic have locked up the majors almost completely since 2004 preventing many new slam winners from emerging.

    I am sure there would have been many less major winners for Rosewall to vanquish had tennis been Open. And regardless of this what does it actually prove anyway? Rosewall had amazing longevity to play so long and beat so many players - but again I would scarcely consider many of these players his actual competition.

    Besides that Federer also has wins over Kafelnikov, Costa, Krajicek- he also played Bruguera (though he lost) as with Rafter. I would be interested to see the lists of other players, there's little doubt Federer's will grow when the next crop starts winning majors.

    If this is your criteria for strength of opposition I find it unlikely that Federer will suffer in this regard compared to players from the last 20 or so years. In the early open era and when the AO wasn't viewed as a true major lesser players could sneak out majors in the absence of the top players unlike now.

    I'm aware that it's subjective. Before the later 30's the Pro and Amateur major divide wasn't so pronounced, I'm only talking about the players previously mentioned.

    As far as strange goes, many of your views are surely stranger...
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2016 at 2:12 AM

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