When Your Doubles Partner Makes a Bad Line Call

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by tennistim, Aug 2, 2012.

  1. Nostradamus

    Nostradamus G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2011
    Messages:
    13,258
    Location:
    In the future
    No, i will not over-rule my partner no matter what. i treat every partner the same. Only time i will go ahead and talk about it with my partner when my opponent cannot hear us. only time is when the line is mine to call as i mentioned. but i still will not over-rule my partner.
     
  2. Mauvaise

    Mauvaise Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
    Messages:
    194
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    If you won't overrule your partner when they call a ball out that they weren't in a position to call and you clearly see the ball in when you have the best vantage point of the ball, then you are wrong. And a cheater.

    I wouldn't want a partner that didn't overrule me when I make a bad call (and let's face it - we *all* make bad calls, even the professional line judges make bad calls). The most important thing is getting the call right, not some twisted sense of team loyalty. I also wouldn't want to partner with someone that didn't want to be overruled.

    It has nothing to do with ignorance and everything to do with sportsmanship and fair play.
     
  3. Nostradamus

    Nostradamus G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2011
    Messages:
    13,258
    Location:
    In the future
    If it is my line to call, i will talk to my partner about it but will not over-rule. Treating all partner the same way is more important to me. We are not playing for $100,000 prize money.
     
  4. NTRPolice

    NTRPolice Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2012
    Messages:
    553
    I think its worth pointing out that "overruling your partner" can be bad sometimes because it does break the synergy between you regardless of the call made or where the ball landed.

    Even if the ball was a ft. in and you overrule your partner they would still get mad. They would either get mad because they tried to cheat and you didnt back them up, or they would get mad because they saw the ball out (mistakenly) and you overruled them on a ball which they thought was out.

    I know this is going to make me sound bad, but i'll say it anyway...

    Depending on the point depends how tight I call the line. If its a set point and I see the ball 1 inch (or less) out, its out. If its a regular point in a game I would probably play it. The point im trying to make is that id normally play a ball out of good faith most of the time. I may have seen both balls out, but id only exercise my right to call the line that tight in a critical point. I really hate calling the line personally and would much rather let an official do it. I've been known to play balls a few inches out just because I dont want to call it out :p
     
  5. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2006
    Messages:
    15,095
    + 1000.

    I am surprised that anyone would openly admit to taking a point they know with 100% certainty wasn't theirs to take. Pretty awful behavior.
     
  6. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2006
    Messages:
    15,095
    You've got it exactly backward. If you consider the score at all, you should bend over backward to call lines more generously on set point. In other words, it needs to be *way* out on set point so that there will be no question in the minds of your opponent and yourself that you didn't steal the set.

    Me, I try to ignore the score in calling lines. In the instances where I have let the score enter my mind, it has caused me to play balls I thought were out. That's because I want to be extra-sure my brain and eyes are not being greedy and "willing" the ball out.

    Better is just watch the ball, look for space, and play it as good if you aren't sure you saw space. Easy.
     
  7. g4driver

    g4driver Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,888
    So simple to do exactly what JRB wrote.

    It doesn't throw your partner under the bus. Just as important it shows you won't cheat to win and that your team is united.
     
  8. Mauvaise

    Mauvaise Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
    Messages:
    194
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    Then you're playing with the wrong partners. If they get mad because you didn't back up their cheating, then good for you and who cares if they get mad! If they get mad because they made a bad call and you corrected it, then they need to get over themselves because it's not about their pride but about getting the call right. Period.

    I tell every new partner that I *want* be overruled if I make an incorrect call and that I'll do the same. It's happened during matches in both directions and no one has gotten mad.

    Maybe I've just been lucky or maybe because I've gone on record from the start that correct calls are more important to me than backing up my partner on an incorrect call (deliberate or otherwise) they make darn sure the ball is 100% out before calling it so. Either way, it's worked for me and I'm sure my opponents appreciate it.
     
  9. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,404
    Location:
    The Great NW
    Well, the lines are in the same place but from a practical standpoint you are playing on a smaller court.

    I don't think your strategy for dealing with this incredibly rare issue is unreasonable, you are valuing your personal integrity (for playing by the rules) over all else and as you point out, it is not impacting your income. I therefore don't disagree with your choice, per se'.

    I have found, though, that people treat you the way you let them treat you. Let me put it this way: if you ended up playing the same guy later, which strategy for dealing with him is more likely to change his behavior (with the understanding that it is totally possible that nothing will change his behavior)?
     
  10. OrangePower

    OrangePower Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Messages:
    4,084
    Location:
    NorCal Bay Area
    I agree with the bolded bit - that's why I think it's important to let the opponent know that you know they are hooking.

    But IMO if that doesn't shame them into changing their behavior, then hooking back isn't likely to, either. And at that point it just degenerates into a contest in blatant hooking - not tennis, and not much fun. Kinda reminds me of another thread a while back about 2 sandbaggers trying to throw the match to each other :)
     
  11. levy1

    levy1 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2008
    Messages:
    1,546
    Location:
    Columbus Ohio
    It is only fair to overrule your partner if you are sure it was in or else you are cheating.By the rules you are not allowed to play a point over due to a call.
     
  12. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2007
    Messages:
    2,770

    But many times it does, many hookers are psychologically insecure and feel they can't win with their playing abilities. When you cheat them back, they get insecure about their abilities to out-cheat their opponents too. They get befuddled, figuring you will beat them with your superior cheating abilities. They give up because they feel you are the superior tennis player and also the superior cheater.
     
  13. moonbat

    moonbat Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Messages:
    643
    I think each partner should call the lines they are supposed to call. If I'm receiving serve, I want to be calling the serve out wide or down the T, not my partner. I want her to call the service line. If I'm in the ad court, and one of our opponents hits a down the line shot into our deuce court, I'm not making that call, unless it's obviously out---there's no way I have an accurate view from across the court, and a lot of in balls look out from that vantage. Baseline is tough...the partner who has the best view across the line should call it, but sometimes both are inside or behind the line.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2013
  14. chatt_town

    chatt_town Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2010
    Messages:
    2,007
    I think it depends on your positioning. I like JRB would pull him to the side if I had the better angle and tell him that I had the better angle and the ball was clearly in. I wouldn't over rule him the first time. I'd give him a chance to do it. If he doesn't I'd over rule him if it happened again.

    As far as your serves being in, I don't know about that. That may have been your concience(sp) eating at you. You can't tell me that you can see your serve better than the net person on the other side. I cussed a guy out two weeks ago for clowning me about balls I called out on his serve in doubles. I didn't go off because he questioned the call. I went off because he was how shall I say it...light in the shoes...sugar boots...you get my drift and was really emontional about it prancing around the court and what not...so I let him have it. Nothing worse than someone trying to call both sides of the net. :)


     
  15. storypeddler

    storypeddler Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2005
    Messages:
    565
    Location:
    Hickory, NC
    Exactly. Don't make a big deal out of it---just go to him and say you saw it in and let him reverse the call to your opponents. No shame in correcting a call you missed. Just be sure you are correct in calling the ball in. If you know for a fact it was in, correct the call. Otherwise, go with the call your partner made. Just do what is right. Be honest.
     

Share This Page