Where your USTA membership fee went

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by West Coast Ace, Nov 23, 2009.

  1. West Coast Ace

    West Coast Ace G.O.A.T.

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    #1
  2. papatenis

    papatenis Semi-Pro

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    Unbelievable!!!!!!!!
    It was my impression that the USTA was a non-profit? Just think how many courts 9 million dollars could have built across America (grow the game), offer more prize money to the futures and challengers, support tennis at high schools, there are many ways to help grow the game, not the salary of it's executives!
     
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  3. West Coast Ace

    West Coast Ace G.O.A.T.

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    'Non-profit' doesn't mean they don't pay salaries. I'm sure they would say they need to pay the top people huge amounts because they have to attract the best talent to 'grow the game'. Looking at the current crop of players who will follow Roddick and Blake make this a dubious claim...

    The American Way got outed a few yrs back - and lost a ton of donations from large companies like mine - when it was exposed that the top executives were women who were married to multi-millionaires and still drew $500k salaries, flew 1st class, stayed in 5-star hotels while taking boondoggles to Paris and other cities.
     
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  4. JavierLW

    JavierLW Hall of Fame

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    Usually when people say that it's apparent they do not understand the true meaning of "non-profit".

    The whole anti-executive pay thing is getting childish already. If you want a well run business and you want to invest in your professional staff as they said, that's their business.

    They are running a business, nobody is putting a gun to anyone's head to give them money (unlike the government) so it's kind of silly to complain if someone makes what seems to you to be a lot of money.

    If this makes you mad, you should see where the rest of the money usually goes. Usually it goes to local "Tennis and Education Foundations" which are run by other "well off" people and couples.

    Face it, most poor people dont run charitys or take the time to head them up, they dont have the time or the resources (or skill) to do so.....
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2009
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  5. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

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    No one is saying that this is illegal. It's just that alot of people might be more inclined to pay for a USTA membership if they felt it was doing more than going to an overpaid executive, (I know, because I'm one of them). Their PR is important. This doesn't help their image and might hurt their ability to raise money in the future.
     
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  6. West Coast Ace

    West Coast Ace G.O.A.T.

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    I agree about corporate America. Most people don't have a clue about the decisions a head of a Fortune 100 makes. And the Left uses it for Class Warfare. But this is different. And I will wait patiently for you to defend the amount AT got. I'm not saying he should get $12,000 a year. But multiple millions? Come on. That's excessive

    Wow, that's pretty callous... and you speled 'charities' wrong - doesn't look good on you...
     
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  7. JavierLW

    JavierLW Hall of Fame

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    Who the heck are we to determine what's excessive or not in someone else's business?

    We live in a supposed free society. Whether it's "non-profit" or not a business has a right to spend whatever it wants on it's executives and that's really non of anyone else's business.

    If it bothers you that much then dont pay the USTA then.

    For me though every year they go over this speel about what our registration goes towards and you know what?

    I think they are missing the whole point. We're customers, we're paying a certain amount of money and we're getting a product. There's really nothing more to it then that. If we are getting a good product then whatever they do with the money is irrelevant.

    If we get a bad product then like I said, nobody puts a gun to anyone's head and tells them they have to pay any business money....
     
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  8. JavierLW

    JavierLW Hall of Fame

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    No it wont.

    That's where they have it wrong, they are not like a normal charity where people necessarily donate money.

    No, we are paying for a product. We pay for membership dues because we need that to gain access to USTA events. We pay registration fees because we want to play on their tennis leagues. We pay tournament fees because we want to play in their tournaments.

    That's been my entire beef with the USTA or anyone who claims that somehow they are "non-profit". They dont seem to understand that on the consumer level they are basically a business, they are selling us a product and we are paying for a product. Where the money goes or how they provide that product is irrelevant just like any other business. (unless we own a stake in the company)

    If you got to the bottom of any large charity you're going to see a similar price. It's just that most of them involve causes that nobody bothers to write a report about. Trust me, this guy wouldnt get paid that sort of salary if there werent others out there making something similar.

    And it's only bad PR for people who care about such silly trivial issues. Any sensible person who cares about contributing money to a cause will look at how much of it is making it to the actual cause, not silly issues like how much is going to the CEO. (which even though it may be more money then you can imagine it's likely a tiny fraction of their overall take for the year)

    If people wanted to get so mad, they should get mad at the government, your typical cause there is such that for every $1 you are taxed, maybe 1c goes to an actual person....
     
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  9. 10sguy

    10sguy Rookie

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    Folks, the BIG revenue generator in/for USTA is the US Open. not our memberships, that's for certain! Others are spot on; we pay a relatively small dues amount for the priveledge of playing or whetever turns our cranks.
     
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  10. bpp

    bpp New User

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    That might be true but what is your source? I believe membership, league, tournament fees,etc. generate a pretty decent percentage of their revenue and probably more then you think. Almost all this work is done on the local level too and by people who are probably working for free.

    Anyways, I just think a lot of people would like to believe that the USTA does it for the love of the game and not the love of money. Does he deserve that much money for his work? Probably not even close to that.
     
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  11. bpp

    bpp New User

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    It appears as if in 2007, the USGA executive director, David Fay made $746,905. The USGA has to be much bigger then the USTA.
     
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  12. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

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    And you spelled 'spelled' wrong...:)

    I don't even want to think about the gross salaries of 'corporate' America...always leaves me wanting to throw something through a window.

    Yes, most of us don't have time to run charities because we actually have to work for a living. Ah well, could be worse...these days, I feel fortunate to even *have* a job.

    And yes, I think USTA dues are pretty small and cheap. I don't join many professional organizations that relate to my job because the dues are in the three figures.
     
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  13. bpp

    bpp New User

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    I will answer my own question. From a Forbes article:

    The money-spinning competition generates an estimated $195 million, about 85% of the United States Tennis Association's (USTA) revenue for the year, the rest of which comes largely from membership dues.
     
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  14. jrod

    jrod Hall of Fame

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    The question to ask here is what has the USTA done for you? In my case, they've done dick-all. Apparently, they continue to excel at this despite leadership changes.

    If you think it's time to dismantle this dinosaur then vote with your wallet.
     
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  15. bpp

    bpp New User

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    Most of what is done for me is done for free by volunteers that could be seperate from the USTA. There is no reason a seperate league could exist and flourish without the USTA (i.e. ALTA in Atlanta). The strength of the USTA is its existing infrastructure.

    Anyways, it looks like they have decided not to fill that position and just have those duties divided among 4 other executives. One questions then how much it was really needed in the first place. That being said, it looks like he was successful in many endeavors (which might speak more to the incompetency of the USTA before him).
     
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  16. fe6250

    fe6250 Semi-Pro

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    “Revenue at the USTA is up $93 million between 2000 and 2008, and we’ve hit other record benchmarks, including 30 million tennis players, the highest USTA membership in our history, and three consecutive record U.S. Opens in attendance and revenue.”

    It appears that much of this guys salary was performance based and kicked in based on a change in the terms of his employment with the USTA. I don't personally have a problem with leaders getting paid based on performance as it promotes leading an organization to new levels of success. It's when the results are in the tank and they make these kind of numbers that they are tough to swallow.
     
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  17. Kostas

    Kostas Semi-Pro

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    I agree with Javier completely.
     
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  18. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    I just renewed my USTA membership. I was asked if I wanted to donate money to help grow the game. I happily declined to contribute a donation to an organization with an overpaid exec.
     
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  19. jrod

    jrod Hall of Fame

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    ^^^ I purchased a 5 year membership and haven't used it or benefited whatsoever in the past 3 years. There are numerous other opportunities to join leagues and play quality tennis outside of the USTA in my area it's highly doubtful I will rejoin. I currently play 5-6x per week and absolutely none of it is USTA sponsored.
     
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  20. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    I think its worth it for me...I haven't found much quality tennis outside of USTA so far.

    What I find absolutely absurd is the $750 for a lifetime membership. Its $160 for 5-years, so you are paying an equivalent to like 23 years of USTA membership just to get the lifetime membership. Most people will NOT get their money's worth on that one.
     
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  21. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

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    I find it well worth it, too...I play a ton of USTA stuff, and would likely not be in the game at all if not for the USTA.

    I'm not sure why some of you would pay for the membership and then not use it to play leagues or tournaments? That's the only reason to join in my opinion.
     
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  22. jrod

    jrod Hall of Fame

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    That's why I initially joined. However, it quickly became clear that they are not the only game in town. I wonder if in the larger metro areas this is generally the case? The junior players around here have no choice but to play USTA....
     
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  23. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

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    That is why I joined as well. For the most part (unless you don't work and join club flights, which are usually during 'work time') USTA is it for us in the DC metro area, but there are *tons* of leagues to choose from, and you can literally have several matches a day if you want. I believe USTA is just about it for the juniors around here, too.

    I actually wish there were half as many adult USTA tournaments as there are juniors!
     
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  24. ebrainsoft

    ebrainsoft Rookie

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    I wonder what the current CEO is making?

    I think the members of this forum are more knowledgeable about tennis than anyone in the USTA. We should start our own tennis association and show the USTA knuckleheads how to do it right!
     
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  25. papatenis

    papatenis Semi-Pro

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    USTA, United States Tennis Association, what have they done for tennis in the United States? Tennis has exploded everywhere in the world except here in the U.S.
    Revenue is up at the U.S. Open, but what happens to that money?
    Every year American colleges are dropping their tennis programs, many of our tennis scholarships are given away to foreign players, why are there less American professionals on tour, many high school teams have to fund themselves with fund raising (we had to pay $750 for our daughter to play on the team this year), tennis tournament fee's for local junior tournaments are now reaching the $40 level, where I live there are no new public tennis courts, instead they are being converted into condos and shopping centers.

    I would think that the "mission statement" of the USTA, would be to grow and support the game of tennis in the United States.
     
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  26. JoelDali

    JoelDali G.O.A.T.

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    How funny.

    I said a few months ago that the USTA doesn't give a damn about league tennis revenue and I was flamed.

    And now this?

    $9 million to ONE guy?

    They don't care about your silly league team.

    LOL
     
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  27. JoelDali

    JoelDali G.O.A.T.

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    Imagine what only $1 million could for 10 talented American kids.

    Where does the money really go?

    No one knows ... :)
     
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  28. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

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    Topaz,

    I have been a member for @ least 10 years and have not played USTA League Tennis or Tourneys in about 15 years. There are other reasons I am a member. BTW.. the USTA is very top heavy and a very large percentage of the work done by the USTA is done by vols and CTAs. Without the CTAs and vols the USTA would get almost nothing done. I could play 7 days a week if my body could take the beating without the USTA.

    Steve
     
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  29. ebrainsoft

    ebrainsoft Rookie

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    Did he have a private jet too?
     
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  30. JavierLW

    JavierLW Hall of Fame

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    Usually that money goes to "Tennis Education Foundations".

    (other charity's which like I said usually involve a couple or a small group which are pretty well off themselves)

    That's how the USTA gets away with being non-profit. All they have to do is give a certain amount of their profits to these other charities and they get to keep non-profit status.

    (they are still a private entity which can pay it's staff whatever it sees fit)
     
    #30
  31. Cruzer

    Cruzer Professional

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    Be careful. You will have all the PC folks up in arms suggesting that the USTA discriminate by giving money to American kids. They will be all over you saying "this is America. the land of equal opportunity for everyone. this country was built by immigrants from other countries, how dare you suggest that only American kids receive financial support from the USTA, blah blah blah" ;)

    Also it seems some people that are naive to the reality that there are quite a few for profit and non-profit organizations that employ people that have seven figure and even eight figure compensation packages. People don't just stumble into these jobs or respond to a job posting on Craigslist. Obviously they must have a fairly impressive skill set that meets the needs of the organization they work for.
    If anyone thinks they can do as good a job or better than Arlen Kantarian then polish up your resume and send it off to the USTA. I'm sure they would love to hear from you.
     
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  32. JoelDali

    JoelDali G.O.A.T.

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    Eh, I'll stick to garbage collecting.
     
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  33. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

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    Agree...our local coordinator works her behind off, and without her, we'd all be sunk!

    I know I wouldn't get as much tennis without the USTA...not unless I didn't have to work. Then I wouldn't need them, but since those lottery people haven't come knocking on my door yet, the leagues and opportunities the USTA leagues provide in my area provide all of my competitive play. And, I think it is pretty cheap!
     
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  34. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

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    The bottom line is that the USTA does filter money down to the lower levels of tennis and grassroots programs.. but nowhere near enough. A few years ago they had a program going to support "Tennis in the Parks". The total budget was something like 1 million for the entire USA. The whole program consisted of USTA marketing info that could be handed out when you ran a summer rec tennis program.. flyers.. CDs.. etc. Very little money for balls. rackets, staff, training..pretty much a complete joke. They also had another program, USA wide that helped fix tennis courts that were in need of repair.. again..very little cash. Think the bottom line there was like a max 10% of the total repair cost. The USTA in general does very little "real" work and very little to support the lower ends (grass roots) of tennis compared to their total budget. 9M to their CEO.. Yikes..but expected. I also know what our local USTA reps/staff make.. and they work very hard for very little money. 9M to the CEO.. hummm..

    Are they growing the game??? I would have see those numbers and how they came up with them. I think it is smoke and mirrors.

    Steve
     
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  35. ebrainsoft

    ebrainsoft Rookie

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    Yes, the local coordinators and volunteers do a GREAT job but why does the USTA pay $9M to Arlen Kantarian??? :confused:
     
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  36. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

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    Yes.. that is the question. I guess because the USA has so many up and coming Pros both on the mens and ladies side. :)
     
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  37. ebrainsoft

    ebrainsoft Rookie

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    Does anyone know if Arlen Kantarian even plays tennis???:-?
     
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  38. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

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    I've never looked into it myself, so I can't speculate...I live in a pretty affluent area, and the courts and facilities here are well kept. If I cross the river into DC I'm not sure I would see the same. The Washinton Tennis and Education Fund sends me a lot of invites to fundraising balls and such, but I can never afford the extravagant ticket price!

    I wasn't really addressing this...more replying to those who think we'd be better off without the USTA.

    Sadly, we see this all the time....grossly overpaid CEO's/chiefs...this isn't just an issue in the USTA.
     
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  39. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    So if the members like me donate to this charity, that is less the organization itself has to donate and more for the CEO's paycheck. No thanks.
     
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  40. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

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    The USTA "talks the talk".. but does not "walk the walk" supporting tennis anywhere near the level they could if the org was not so top heavy. As you say... not just the USTA..sorry to say. Work as a vol.. or join a CTA.. run a grassroots program and your eyes will be wide open.

    Thanks for the great insights.

    Steve
     
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  41. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

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    Of course...overhead! If you want to make a difference growing the game.. teach a few kids in your area how to play... donate a frame.. restring a few frames for free..etc Donate your time to help coach a HS team... or run a Junior Team Team program or team. Thats how you grow the game.

    Steve
     
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  42. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

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    ^^^along with another TTW member, we did set up an after-school tennis program at my school last fall. And the local Y has a great indoor after-school tennis program as well. However, again, I think my area may be more of an exception rather than the rule.
     
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  43. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

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    Topaz,

    Nice work. The USTA does a have "Schools Program" that will send a USTA Trainer to teach your staff how to run a tennis unit in their phys ed class and also how help run an afterschool program. BTW.. you can get a small USTA JTF or JFT grant ( .. humm not sure which one) to help support your efforts. If you can get some cash buy some Quick Start equipment that is really great. Just ask your USTA rep. Don't expect to get paid...LOL..just enjoy teaching the kids. Your pay will be their desire and pleasure.

    Great to hear you love to give back.. now thats how you grow the game. The best part is that you are creating future hitting partners.. what until they grow up..come back and run you all over the court..

    Have a great day.
    I think I might have to send you some x-mas cookies for your efforts.

    Steve
     
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  44. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

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    hahaha, and here I am online looking up pumpkin oatmeal cookie recipes!

    You know, our PE teachers have the equipment...junior racquets and such, but no surface (or court) at our school. The after school program that I helped MrHan (doesn't post much) arrange used a court that was just down the street. But for PE purposes, it would have to be at the school...I wonder why we have all that equipment (literally, a rack of rackets!)...I'll have to ask the teachers if they ever did use them, and how.

    We had a tennis unit when I was in HS PE, and I LOVED it...it was usually only 2 days at most though. Maybe that's why our HS team was so baaaaaad! Lol, but we had fun!
     
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  45. tennismom42

    tennismom42 Semi-Pro

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    actually the article said it was a CONTRACT with a set ending time. Therefore, I am left wondering if he was a consultant and responsibile for paying his own expenses? If so, then $9 million only sounds a little bit rediculous, instead of grossly rediculous.
     
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  46. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

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    I just got this:

    No. 199-2009
    U.S. TENNIS PARTICIPATION TOPS 30 MILLION PEOPLE
    FOR THE FIRST TIME IN MORE THAN 25 YEARS
    2009 USTA/Tennis Industry Association (TIA) Study Shows Growth
    In All Age Groups and Ethnicities

    Participation up 12% vs. 2008 and 25% since 2003

    WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., November 17, 2009 – The USTA and TIA announced today that tennis
    participation in the United States topped 30 million players for the first time in more than two
    decades. The annual survey of 6,000 Americans showed that tennis participation grew in all
    age groups under the age of 50 and within all ethnicities. With 30.1 million people hitting the
    courts, tennis participation has grown 12% over 2008 and climbed 25% since 2003. The survey
    is conducted annually by the Taylor Research Group on behalf of the Tennis Industry
    Association (TIA) and the USTA.

    New players comprised 7.1 million of the total, and the majority of tennis players consider
    themselves “regular players” (14.8 million). Though 15 of the 17 USTA sections were affected
    by record rainfall in the spring, total play occasions surpassed 560 million for only the second
    time in more than 20 years. The greatest percentage growth in participation was in players 1217 which grew from 15.7% of the total participants in 2008 to 20.5% of the participants in 2009.

    “The USTA continues to work closely with the entire tennis industry to grow our game, and we
    are extremely gratified that our collective efforts have generated such strong growth,” said Lucy

    S. Garvin, USTA President and Chairman of the Board. “We continue to strive to make tennis
    easier to learn and more fun to play, and this commitment has led to millions of more Americans
    playing the game. I am proud of our network of sections, states/districts, and community
    programs who have worked so hard to increase participation.”
    “Over the past several years, we’ve strived to make the game more accessible, particularly at
    parks and schools across the country,” said Kurt Kamperman, Chief Executive, Community
    Tennis, USTA. “Combine this with the health benefits of tennis, and you get surging interest in
    the sport.”

    “The TIA (industry) and the USTA have been focused on growing participation since the mid 90s
    and this is the result of a consistent and sustained effort that is now paying dividends,” said TIA
    President Jon Muir. “Our ongoing challenge is to continue to build our frequent player base, the
    economic lifeline for the sport.”

    The TIA/USTA survey results include:

    • Total participation broke the 30 million mark in 2009 (a 12% increase to 30.1
    million, against 26.9 million in 2008).
    • New players reached 7.1 million (up 19.5% from 5.9 million in 2008).
    • Regular Players, those playing 4 to 20 times per year, increased 26% to 14.8
    million players in 2009.

    -2

    • Participation in 2009 is up in every major ethnic group, but especially among
    African Americans (+19%) and Hispanics (+32%)
    • Age groups comprising the greatest percentage of players are:
    o 12-17 years at 20.5% of the total (more than 6 million players)
    o 18-24 years at18.4% of the total (more than 5.5 million players)
    o 6-11 years at 16.25% of the total (4.9 million players)
    • Tennis is doing a better job at retention with continuing players up 6.3% to 16
    million
    • Former players rejoining to the game is up for the third year in a row, with nearly
    7 million coming back to tennis
    The TIA/USTA results compare favorably to other recent research released from industry
    organizations over the past 12 months. In the 2009 Sports and Fitness Participation Report
    conducted by the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association (SGMA), results showed tennis
    was the only traditional sport to enjoy growth in grassroots participation.

    ###

    About the USTA

    The USTA is the national governing body for the sport of tennis in the U.S. and the leader in promoting and
    developing the growth of tennis at every level --from local communities to the highest level of the professional game.
    A not-for-profit organization with 730,000 members, it invests 100% of its proceeds in growing the game. It owns and
    operates the US Open, the highest attended annual sporting event in the world, and launched the Olympus US Open
    Series linking 10 summer tournaments to the US Open. In addition, it owns the 94 Pro Circuit events throughout the
    U.S., is a minority owner and promotional partner of World TeamTennis, and selects the teams for the Davis Cup,
    Fed Cup, Olympic and Paralympic Games. The USTA philanthropic entity, USTA Serves, provides grants and
    scholarships and through tennis, helps underserved youth and people with disabilities to improve academics, build
    character and strive for excellence. For more information on the USTA, log on to usta.com.

    About the TIA

    The Tennis Industry Association, the not-for-profit trade association for tennis, is THE unifying force in the tennis
    industry bringing together competitive companies to work collectively to promote and grow the sport. The TIA works
    closely with the USTA and industry partners to develop and implement initiatives to increase tennis participation.
    Core TIA activities include Participation Research, Consumer and Trade Research and the Growing Tennis System.
    For more information, please visit TennisIndustry.org or GrowingTennis.com.

    For more information, contact:

    Tim Curry, Director, Corporate Communications, USTA – (914) 696-7077; curry@usta.com
    Jolyn de Boer, Executive Director, TIA – (843) 686-3036 ext. 222; jolyn@tennisindustry.org


     
    #46
  47. kylebarendrick

    kylebarendrick Professional

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2006
    Messages:
    1,042
    Location:
    Northern California
    Who wants to grow the game? That would only make it even harder to find open courts!

    Humbug
     
    #47
  48. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    5,371
    Not hard to find here. I have not waited to play on public courts since 1975.

    Steve
     
    #48
  49. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2006
    Messages:
    5,997
    Thats kinda how I see it. In my area there are lots of outdoor courts, both public and private, but the demand for these courts far outnumbers the supply. We need to either lose some players or build more courts. Indoor courts here are really scarce though. The only way you can really find indoor court time is to play in USTA leagues or to rent block time for the season. If you're lucky maybe you can find an empty slot if you call them up a week in advance.

    But I guess with the growth of the game comes construction of more tennis courts. As long as supply is adequate for the demand I don't mind the growth, but so far supply has fallen behind in areas like mine.
     
    #49
  50. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Messages:
    6,811
    Maybe availability of local, public courts (and their condition) is a good way to informally assess the 'state of tennis' in your local area...like I said before, I think my area is the exception rather than the rule.
     
    #50

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