whetstones for sharpening knives?

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by ramseszerg, Nov 26, 2009.

  1. ramseszerg

    ramseszerg Professional

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    I need a whetstone for my really old chef's knife. Are there different whetstones I should get for different knives, or are they all the same?
     
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  2. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    I prefer the ceramic rods.

    J
     
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  3. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    There is a world of difference between whetstones including composition, purity, grade and coarseness. What's the knife brand and any markings on the blade?
     
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  4. ramseszerg

    ramseszerg Professional

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    My current knife is a a Dorco Essay (Korean brand) that is really old, it's got a microscopic zigzag damage and one noticeable dent. However, I plan to get this:

    http://www.amazon.ca/Shun-Classic-8...r_1_7?ie=UTF8&s=kitchen&qid=1258260517&sr=8-7

    in the future and I would rather the stone I get now match that knife than the current one.
     
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  5. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    I"ve got a couple of whetstones: I find that the longest one is much easier to use since you can take long swipes down it. I like the fact that there's a coarse side as well as a fine side.
     
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  6. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    Since the blade is Korean, and older, there's a good chance that the steel is pretty decent. If so, it may very well be worth it to have the blade redone and polished (ie sharpened). Here's a link to an incredibly good knife sharpener. You may want to email Dave about your Dorco Essay knife. I bet he might have a good idea about whether it would be worth it to restore it or not. http://www.japaneseknifesharpening.com

    If you decide to just get the Shun, you have to realize that this is Japanese steel using Japanese sharpening angles and you need to invest in some good Japanese, high quality waterstones as well as a very good honing "steel" like an Idahone Ceramic rod. You can also find Borosilicate rods that are great. You have to realize that sharpening is about a once a year procedure with the hone being used to realign the edge.

    I would probably get a 1,000 waterstone and a 5,000 or 6,000 finishing polishing stone. If you want to get scary, scary sharp (as opposed to just scary sharp :)) you can make a strop leather block and strop using Al Oxide .5 micron polishing compound.

    These videos from Dave show a ton of info on knife sharpening, particularly Japanese steel. And BTW, I'm not associated with Dave by any means. He's a guy who has a passion for sharpening and is very, very well respected for his work.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MezIEKGk9T0
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSyK67mqXEI
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtkwvoYaus4
     
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  7. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Awesome info, thanks for sharing tommer.

    J
     
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  8. ramseszerg

    ramseszerg Professional

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    Thanks mtommer and everyone else!
     
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  9. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    No problem guys. Glad to help! Just be careful though as cutlery can become an addicting subject to learn about! :)D)
     
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  10. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    If you are going to use a whetstone yourself, getting the angles right (starting then finishing) is not trivial to perform and is essential to a great final product. I too prefer ceramic rods for this reason.
     
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