Which bag has the best thermal protection?

Discussion in 'Other Equipment' started by Raphael, May 25, 2010.

  1. Raphael

    Raphael Semi-Pro

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    The topic says it all.

    Has consumer reports or something like it, done an independent test to see which thermal protection is best?

    Thanks!
     
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  2. mrw

    mrw Semi-Pro

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    Dunlop makes a nice one as does Wilson. I scored a Wilson rather cheaply and am happy with it
     
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  3. jwbarrientos

    jwbarrientos Hall of Fame

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    I watched strong material and heard good comments about BB, Dunlop, Head, material UMHO looks similar but Babolat looks wider.

    Personally use PK Super 9, can't complain about the thermal protection, had left my bag on my car many times.
     
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  4. tennisnj

    tennisnj Professional

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    Boris Becker bags do not have thermal protection (nor do Volkl).
     
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  5. SirGounder

    SirGounder Hall of Fame

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    My Babolat Aero bag is great. The bag is solid, barely any wear after 4 years. The thermal compartments are great too. Stays cool in my car even during Socal summers.
     
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  6. Mig1NC

    Mig1NC Professional

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    I have the big Dunlop Aerogel bag (like a 10-pack or something). Very good thermal properties. But honestly my previous three bags were not thermal so I can't really compare them.

    All I can say is that I am very happy with it.
     
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  7. bharat

    bharat Rookie

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    I agree, my aero is pretty much brand new after 2 yrs. Very solid, almost makes u want it look used. Dont want to be the new guy going around with a new bag all the time :)
     
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  8. ryangoring

    ryangoring Professional

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    Wilson of course.
     
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  9. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Let's face it. The thermal protection of bags is largely a hoax.

    There is no way that less than inch of insulation is going to keep the compartment from heating up in an hour or less.

    So while this may be long enough to leave your bag in your car while you run in the store to buy some Gatorade, there is no way that you racquet and strings are not getting cooked if left in a hot car for any length of time.

    Someone actually did a test of car trunk temperatures based on the color of the car left out in the sun on an 80 degree day. The temperature in the white car trunk got to 88 degrees, a light grey 102 degrees, and a black car trunk 133 degrees. http://www.tom-morrow-land.com/tests/cartemp/index.htm

    So if you value your racquet and strings, don't leave them in a parked car, with or without a bag with thermal protection.


    And similarly if you are out on the tennis courts with extra racquets in your bag, keep it in the shade, or as much shade as possible. (By the way, the hood temperature in that car study of a red car, the color of Wilson bags, was 140 degrees.)
    Or just leave the racquet compartment unzipped for air circulation so it doesn't get hotter than it is outside.
     
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  10. Raphael

    Raphael Semi-Pro

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    #10
  11. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    I wouldn't expect Consumer Union or a similar group to do a test of something of such limited interest. But I think Charlie's probaly right about the limited value of the insulation, not only because it's so thin but because the metal zippers conduct heat very well and would likely render the insulation useless. (Some parkas are made with non-metal or coated zippers for this reason, or with a flap that goes over the zippers.) Stick a themometer in your bag with the racquets, put it in your trunk on a hot sunny day, and check the tempeature in an hour. I'd be really surprised if it wasn't plenty warm in the bag. (Note -- feeling the racquets is not indicative as graphite doesn't conduct heat as well.)
     
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  12. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    ^^^^ +1. additionally, comparing thermal bags to insulated clothing is silly.
    Humans, when wearing insulating clothing are producing the heat they are trying to retain through the use of said clothing.

    Tennis rackets produce no heat and no cooling so any bag will achieve ambient temperature in a short amount of time. To help keep rackets from cooking, keep the in the shade or a cooler place. Don't expect a bag to keep them cool. Perhaps if you want to throw an ice bag in or something it may help for a short while.
     
    #12
  13. retlod

    retlod Professional

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    "Thermal" bags do nothing. Foil reflects infrared radiation, all of which is coming from the outside. Put the foil on the outside of the bag and you might see an effect. Otherwise, insulation in tennis bags is about trapping layers of air between your racquet and the outside. Each layer will limit the amount of convective heating your racquets receive from the outside. Want better insulation than a bag alone can provide? Wrap your racquets in towels, then put them in the bag.
     
    #13
  14. Lefty78

    Lefty78 Professional

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    If you must leave racquets in your trunk during the summer months, use a cooler. Even the cheap styrofoam ones work pretty well, if you can find one long enough to fit racquets.
     
    #14

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