Which woodie? WIlson, Bancroft?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by dirkgnuf, Nov 14, 2006.

  1. dirkgnuf

    dirkgnuf Rookie

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    I recently became interested iin buying some wooden racquets and I have narrowed down to a fw models. They include WIlson JK pro staff, JK autograph, Advantage
    As for Bancorft, they seem to have a lot of those BOrg ones, so maybe one of those. I do play with extreme eastern, but I just want these racqeuts as a traning aid or for fun.
    Reccomendations?
    I also play with a 2-handed backhand, so I mean, what models are good for that as well?
    Did Wilson ever make woodies for two handers?
    Maybe strengths,weaknessess of the models?
    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2006
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  2. s_andrean

    s_andrean Rookie

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    Dunlop Maxply Fort. Although the Donnay Borg one is pretty good too.
     
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  3. vsbabolat

    vsbabolat Legend

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    The Wilson Jack Kramer Autograph and Jack Kramer Pro Staff are great racquets. You can't go wrong with either.
     
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  4. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    Depends on your style: I own all of the above woodies so I can help.

    If you have a one handed backhand, I really wouldn't go with the Bancroft Borg. I find it hard to maneuver for a one hander. I love the Kramer Pro Staff for one handers and serve & volleying.

    If you're a two hander who sticks to the baseline more, the Bancroft/Donnay Borg/Allwood is a great stick.

    It depends on your style. The Dunlop Maxply Fort is a great stick too and one I played with for a while. It feels a touch head heavier than the Kramer/Maxply McEnroe.
     
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  5. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    I like the Rossignol Strato's also. Go to woodtennis.com and look at the huge selection. Personally, I didn't like the way the Bancroft bamboo shaft rackets played very well.
     
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  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Rookie

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    Good Woodie

    Pro Kennex Golden Ace. Has a slightly larger head size and graphite layer on each face to provide more stiffness. The frame does not flex as much as the other racquets mentioned on this thread. Also, it is relatively light.
     
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  7. Colpo

    Colpo Professional

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    I'm a fan of the late-model, open-throat woods, like the Slazenger V-24, Prince Woodie, Head Edgewood and Le Coq Sportif Noah TCO. Awesome frames that aren't a complete goof to bring on to a court today, and the Woodie is regarded by many as the best Prince ever and a real racquet engineering feat, pound for pound.
     
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  8. vsbabolat

    vsbabolat Legend

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    Another good open throat wood racquet is the Dunlop A-Player.
     
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  9. dirkgnuf

    dirkgnuf Rookie

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    Hmm.. another question I have is whether I should try to get a "light" or "medium" woodie and what difference does it make?
    Does anyone reccommend the Head Vilas with graphite/wood?

    Last question, are the Wilson models like JK autograph and advantage, are they suited for two handed backhands, and if I wanted to string a wooden racquet, where should I go, since there are no tennis shops in my state.
    (I live near Pennsylvania though) so maybe there?
     
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  10. vsbabolat

    vsbabolat Legend

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    The lights are lighter that the mediums. The lights will be around 13oz. strung. So I would go with a light.

    The HEAD vilas is great racquet. It has open throat with a standerd size head. Colpo was recomending open throat wood racquets that were mid-size and bigger.

    Yes the JK autograph and Advantage are suited to two handed backhands.
     
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  11. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    I always thought the Advantage was quite similar to the Maxply McEnroe and Kramer PS.. wouldn't that make it suited to a one hander?

    I can tell you what's NOT suited to a one hander and it's the Bancroft Borg. The Donnay Allwood is pretty good for a one hander but the Bancroft is a nightmare for a one hander.

    It's tough to beat the Maxply Fort and Kramer Pro Staff. Long live wood.
     
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  12. vsbabolat

    vsbabolat Legend

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    I have a two handed backhand. I learned to play tennis with wood racquets. I used the Maxply McEnroe for almost two years before switching to mid-size garphite racquets. I loved the Maxply McEnroe. It is my favorite wood racquet. I don't believe in such a thing as a racquet being good for a one handed backhand and not for two or viceversa
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2006
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  13. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    Well you did say the Advantage was suited for a two hander...

    Anyway, I find that certain racquets are suited for certain playing styles. The Bancroft Borg is definitely better for a two hander than a JK Pro Staff is suited to a one hander. I think balance and flex are the key here.

    Anyway I have a one hander and love my Kramer PS and Maxply Fort, though they play different.

    I'm looking for some TA Davis racquets: the Imperial and Classic.
     
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  14. vsbabolat

    vsbabolat Legend

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    Like I said I have a two handed backhand and I did not like the Bancroft Borg but I do really like the Wilson JK Pro Staff and Autograph. It has to do with the individuals taste in racquets.
     
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  15. Mick

    Mick Legend

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    I prefer the Donnay Borg Pro over the Bancroft Borg because I think it looks nicer.
     
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  16. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    I do too, but doesn't it seems like they play differently or is that in my head/the strings?
     
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  17. Mick

    Mick Legend

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    I don't think they would play much differently since Borg has used both .

    Bancroft Borg
    [​IMG]

    Donnay Borg Pro
    [​IMG]
     
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  18. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    Yeah I know. Someone did mention around here however that the Bancroft was just a paintjob.

    I can't confirm this, but I do find it odd that Borg would switch to a different racquet back and forth during any given year. Can you imagine if Sampras switched to a 200g for Wimbledon and a PS85 for the US open?
     
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  19. LttlElvis

    LttlElvis Professional

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    Yes, I remember the rumors of Borg using a paintjob of one or the other. He used the Bancroft Borg pro in the U.S., and the Donnay Allwood in Europe. One had to be a paint job of the other

    When he switched to the Donnay Borg Pro, he used that worldwide.
     
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  20. LttlElvis

    LttlElvis Professional

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    I remember reading a book by Bill Scanlon. He said the Jack Kramer autograph, the Stan Smith Autograph, the Chris Evert Autograph, and the Jack Kramer Pro Staff(double diamonds), were all the same racquets except for minor cosmetics. (2 handed grip on Evert and diamond inlays on the Kramer Pro).

    I think the Borg Pro was the same as the Bancroft Players Select except for the extended grip.

    I think the companies used the same racquet with minor cosmetics to market towards different groups: men, women, one and 2 handed backhands.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2006
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  21. Mick

    Mick Legend

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    Yeah it is weird because Borg was a very supertitious guy. He would wear the same Fila style shirt, grow his mustache and bear to the same length, and follow the same routine every year to enhance his chance of defending the Wimbledon title but then he would switch racket brand when he came over to the US.

    I don't believe he has won any big tournament with the Bancroft racket. It was a jinx for him :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2006
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  22. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    I have noticed the Stan Smith looks awfully a lot like the Kramer.

    I'm in the process of buying a couple of Davis racquets: the Imperial and Classic II. The Classic is gorgeous. I hope it hits as well as it looks.
     
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  23. Mick

    Mick Legend

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    Nice :)

    You know, when I take my wood racquet out to play, I would never try to return balls that are out of reach because I don't want to scratch my antique racquet. My goal is to bring the racquet back from the match in exactly the same condition as I bring it in :)
     
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  24. dirkgnuf

    dirkgnuf Rookie

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    So The JK series and The Advantage are fine for two handers as well as one handers, and I assume the same can be applied to the Head Vilas. Also, I have a chance to buy an unstrung woodie, but I don't really have a place to string it around here. Is it a better bet to stick with wood/graphite than wood?
     
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  25. Mick

    Mick Legend

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    sure, if you want more power but then most of us would already have a modern graphite racket, so we would use the graphite racket if we need power. For that reason, I prefer a pure wood racket than graphite/wood racket.

    I believe a tennis shop can string any kind of racket, new or old. There isn't a tennis shop close to where you live ?
     
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  26. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    Are you concerned about a pure wood racquet breaking during stringing? I'm not sure what your concern is.

    I wouldn't worry about wood. They've stood the test of time. I recommend stringing low. I'm gonna start stringing my at about 38 lbs. I like low tensions though.

    Overall you can't go wrong with a Kramer PS. They're easy to find and they're pretty cheap. I guarantee if you buy a pair and play with a friend you will discover tennis in its more purest and entertaining form.
     
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  27. Redflea

    Redflea Hall of Fame

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    Yup...maxply fort all the way...
     
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  28. Andres

    Andres G.O.A.T.

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    I have the Donnay Borg, a black Fischer one, and a Head Vilas.
    Among them all, the Head Vilas is the most stable and the one with the best overall performance.

    You should try it ;)
     
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  29. Midlife crisis

    Midlife crisis Hall of Fame

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    If you like the feel of the JKA, you'll probably hate the feel of the Imperial, Classic, or Professional racquets. They have a very slender, flexy throat and just a different weight distribution throughout the racquet that makes them play quite differently. I couldn't play well with them 30 years ago, and I still can't hit well with them today. I hope your experience is different.
     
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  30. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    Worst case scenario I hang them on the wall, but I should hope I like their feel. Flexy is fine but I hope the weight feels right. Are they anything like a Maxply Fort? Because I like how that feels too.
     
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  31. Midlife crisis

    Midlife crisis Hall of Fame

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    At least to me, they hit nothing like a Maxply Fort. I actually used a Maxply Fort up until a couple of months ago as a practice racquet. Unfortunately, it's now spoon shaped so I'm trying to decide whether or not to just trash it or try and salvage it by hanging it on a wall somewhere. Anyway, my impressions are that the Maxply Fort seems to have a lighter, hollower feel than the JKA, but the flex patterns are pretty similar to each other. At least they both look like they play. Maybe that is what's causing me the problem with the TAD racquets. They have no reinforcing piece on the throat section of the hoop, and the hoop section itself is very thin and almost spindly looking, just like the shaft. It looks like it would be really flexible and it is, but the hoop is heavier and stiffer than it appears and somehow the balance is just off.
     
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  32. prostaff18

    prostaff18 Semi-Pro

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    Andres what dose the Head Vilas play like? My friends and I play doubles once a week with wood racquets and I was wondering about getting one. Right now I play with some Slazenger, can’t even remember the name but it has some sticker on it that says something about some kind of anniversary for the company.
     
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