Who are today's Brad Gilberts?

Discussion in 'General Pro Player Discussion' started by Bilbo, May 22, 2010.

  1. Bilbo

    Bilbo Semi-Pro

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    Who are the Brad Gilberts of today's game?
     
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  2. Frankauc

    Frankauc Professional

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    the worm

    stepanek
     
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  3. BullDogTennis

    BullDogTennis Hall of Fame

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    the game now, with all the spins requires great technique...
     
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  4. Raindogs

    Raindogs Professional

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    There are none.
     
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  5. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

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    murray. think about it. then respond
     
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  6. himynameisNIKE

    himynameisNIKE Professional

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    oh......OH MY :shock:
     
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  7. Nanshiki

    Nanshiki Hall of Fame

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    The level of competition has pretty much become too high for the Brad Gilberts of the world to get inside of the Top 100, much less the Top 5.
     
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  8. djokovicgonzalez2010

    djokovicgonzalez2010 G.O.A.T.

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    Radek Stepanek
     
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  9. darthpwner

    darthpwner Banned

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    Yeah, Murray probably has the most similar game to Brad, his former coach.
     
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  10. JuliusWinto

    JuliusWinto Rookie

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    I think Brad Gilbert had more talent than people give him credit for. He had world class talent, unlike any of us in this forum. When someone asks who are the Brad Gilberts of this generation, I think that means who has the best reactive tactics without possessing ridiculous weapons. I definitely think Murray is the first one to come to mind, and it's interesting that Gilbert was his coach. Good fit actually, except I wouldn't put up with Gilbert's mouth either. Who else? Simon?
     
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  11. jodd

    jodd New User

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    Sorry for the paragraph.

    All I know of him comes from a wikipedia article - no killer stroke, didn't hit with pace, 'broke rhythm' of opponents...seems like he adjusted his game slightly depending on his opponent's style of play.

    Being curious, I checked this youtube vid out:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T17zqevDMBw

    I don't know which wing was Becker's stronger side, but his backhand certainly looks like a nice rally shot here. Gilbert seems to be keeping him in the backhand corner, diffusing the pace, and waiting for him to come in off (a subpar?) approach shot for the pass.

    The backhand up the line looks good even on the run, but neither stroke, especially the forehand, is anything to write home about. The ball doesn't land particularly deep on most of his shots, but the spin and trajectory (mostly the spin: slice, flatter shot, spinny stroke) vary just enough to make Becker a little uncomfortable I guess.

    So, I'd say today's Brad Gilbert is definitely Andy Murray, I'd be tempted to say Gilles Simon but personally know very little about his game.

    Andy's more talented though (granted I'm extrapolating from this ONE video)- better strokes, great serve, great return, surprising athleticism - and he has to play a similar game against people who hit harder and run even faster.

    Players like these fascinate me: they seem to be very good at anticipating their opponent's response to their shots, so they're never caught off guard by a net approach or a more attacking shot. Not only this, but they really seem to show just how mental a tennis game can be. After so many times of coming into net and being passed, making errors on what would have been winners but weren't b/c of an odd spin or placement, I imagine it's quite easy to lose confidence and contribute to your own demise.

    They also show just how much tennis is a game of patterns and risk. Pro tennis players are great athletes, and while they can improvise and adjust their bodies in brilliant ways, they still generally desire to minimize risk when they attack, and thus habitually choose certain points in rallies, and certain positions on court, for attacking. Being attentive to these habits, and the openings that appear when an opponent chooses a too-risky option, is classic, cerebral counterpunching.

    All in all, though - these dudes can definitely be boring to watch sometimes.
     
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  12. BullDogTennis

    BullDogTennis Hall of Fame

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    pretty much....gilbert didn't have the 'tennis' talent or form...he would just win....today, with the way the game plays if you do not have the form....you can't compete....serving and volleys 100% of the tiem won't do it!
     
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  13. Cup8489

    Cup8489 Legend

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    watching that video, i am reminded of how i never understood why his strokes were called 'ugly.' he did the fundamentals very well, and his intelligence on court makes him the perfect role model for most tennis players out there, who mostly just don't have the weapons to be world-beaters in general. I read his book, and studied some of his on-court actions, and it helped me become a better player.
     
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  14. darthpwner

    darthpwner Banned

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    Gilbert's continental grips are ugly.
     
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  15. darthpwner

    darthpwner Banned

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    Holy ****, insane dive by Becker at 2:34 and Gilbert wins the point several shots later with a running backhand up the line.
     
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  16. hawk eye

    hawk eye Hall of Fame

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    Well he might be a little different from Brad Gilbert but Santoro until very recently was also a player who drove the big hitters nuts with his variety of spins, angles and off pace shots.
    No great weapons in terms of power but he definately posessed great touch and vision.
     
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  17. orangettecoleman

    orangettecoleman Professional

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    The main characteristic of Gilbert's game is that he would completely adapt his approach depending on the player... I'm not sure whether anyone does that now, everyone just brings their "A" game and if that's not working, they lose. Murray is the only exception that comes to mind, honestly... Santoro used to do that as the above poster states. Hingis as well, also retired. I guess it's all about power these days :(
     
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  18. West Coast Ace

    West Coast Ace G.O.A.T.

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    With modifications for the modern game, IMHO the closest would be Ferrer. But the Murray suggestion isn't far off. The 130+ mph serve being the one problem with that comparison.
     
    #18
  19. nereis

    nereis Semi-Pro

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    IMO Roddick plays the most Gilbert-y game now. He adapts his game to each and every opponent so that he never plays the same way against anyone. Against Roger he bashes every ball because he knows he has no chance otherwise, but against guys like Djokovic who thrive on pace to the corners he spins it into the middle of the court and throws off their timing. Not even Murray for all his vaunted variety really changes his tactics. He just plays the same counterpunching game against everyone. It's just that Nadal gives him more short balls into the backhand for him to hit.
     
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