Who has taken an extended work-break to focus on tennis?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by millardus, Apr 26, 2013.

  1. millardus

    millardus Rookie

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    A long post, sorry! Read if you want to hurt your brain! :twisted:

    I'm mulling over this sort of thing myself, but I'm only think 6 months.

    Slow Friday afternoon, got me musing. So, who on here has taken an extended break from work to commit some proper time to their tennis (I think I could swing it at work)?

    I know of one guy on here that took a 18-24 month sabbatical, from a position of being a strong player already. What can realistically be achieved in a 6 MONTH period I wonder, with the following setup:

    - 34 years old, (ok, 3 weeks from 35!), 5 ft 9.775, married, no children for 2-3 years. Wife who would also like to do the same, for herself.
    - Finances ok for that time
    - Must be at a fighting tennis weight before starting, but not necessarily singles tennis fit (i.e. gym and drills would form part of tennis 6 months)
    - I have volleycam, Lobster ball machine, various court strings and cones and things already.
    - I have a tennis club membership, though *might* also consider joining an indoor club for 6 months to ensure playing (Acrylic and carpet courts)
    - currently a middling 4.0 (Play higher ability dubs than singles though), played a lot from 11-15 yr old, then stopped for 12/13 years completely, treaded water from 28-33. 33-34 got more focussed.
    - 2 hrs coaching per week with a friend, 2 separate hours however. Friend is LTA 3.1, 26 years old fairly active player, and a performance coach.

    So, assuming the necessary dedication, and let's say 30 hrs per week of tennis training (Court time and physical training), what do we think is achievable over 6 months?

    Your answers and\or recommendations can range from:

    - Stupid open question
    - A ratings bump answer
    - A more practical, *you will get more control over your shots and gain confidence* type answers
    - Why bother, save your money!
    - Whatever answer you fancy giving!

    This is a Friday afternoon time-filler as well as a reasonably serious first pass at working out if this is worth it.

    My own personal motivation will be the ultimate decider, but I'm interested in people's success stories or insight.
     
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  2. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Are you and your wife really on the same page about not having children?

    What will being a better tennis player do for you?

    Will you really be more happy at 4.5 than at 4.0?

    How quickly after returning to work will your tennis prowess fall off?

    Are you getting up now to work out before you go to work so you can concentrate on your tennis in the evening?

    Could you benefit more from your ball machine by working more on your weakest ground stroke and volleying - running to return balls hit far away from your initial position?

    Could you currently fit in several 20 minute sessions practicing your serve each week?

    At 34, and allowing your body to recover from the training an tennis, how many more hours could you really train and play by taking time off, and not start to break down?
     
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  3. Avles

    Avles Hall of Fame

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    If your finances and career make it feasible, your wife is on board and this is what you really want, why not? It sounds like a great time, and I'm sure your game (and your fitness) would improve dramatically if you stuck with your plan.

    A couple random bits of advice...

    Take a sec to consider what else you could do with that time and money. e.g. travel, learn a language, develop some other new skill to carry with you for the rest of your life. Not saying that tennis isn't a worthy goal (I think it is!) but there could be an opportunity cost issue here.

    Depends on your personality, but if your goal is to really make progress (and not just have a fun 6 months) it'll probably be good to build as much structure into your daily activities as possible. From what I've heard, sabbaticals are very easily squandered.

    Also, overtraining/getting injured would be a potential pitfall so I think you'd want to pay pretty close attention to that.

    If you do go for it, I hope we'll get to see some before and after videos!
     
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  4. maggmaster

    maggmaster Hall of Fame

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    I work a full time job and still manage to get 20 hours on the court and 5 in the gym every week. I wish I could do what you are proposing, that would be amazing. I would imagine that you could get to 4.5 if you really applied yourself and did everything right. Barring injuries of course.
     
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  5. millardus

    millardus Rookie

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    On the kids front, the lady is the one more keen to wait for kids, she's a few years younger than me. Fine with me, our friends just had their first child at 41 so we've got precedent!

    I like the questioning abt the motivation, nice one!

    Would I be happier at 4.5...... I'm sure I would tennis-wise, but the *cost* would have a bearing on that. Playing at a consistent 4.5 but losing 6 months of income and security.... I don't know.

    If I thought I could get close to 5.0, then perhaps it would feel more worthwhile, but I'm a realist, I understand the magnitude of jumping from a 6.1/6.2 to 4.1\4.2 in 6 months, it's just not possible!

    In saying that, you'd certainly achieve a great deal with 6 months of dedicated tennis. Perfect your technique, develop a strong work and training ethic...so perhaps it has fringe benefits beyond just the tennis improvement.

    In saying that, perhaps weekly focussed micro sessions would have the same overall *tennis* impact, just over a longer period. And the dedication needed to workout in the mornings, and be on court most evenings..... that in itself takes motivation.

    But flipping back again, those 6 months would theoretically help you achieve a fitness level the greatest of your life in a relatively short time window, an achievement in it's own right.

    There's the vanity factor, we cant underestimate that ;-)
     
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  6. millardus

    millardus Rookie

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    Well, no matter whether I do this as a 6 month thing or extended period while working, if I go ahead with it I will blog via wordpress for sure.

    A starting point would be similar to this link below, though my forehand has improved a bit since this march vid.... the video was revealing abt the forehand fallibility.

    As you can see, I need more commitment on the backhand side too.....there are a host of areas to improve.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hBZ0O4JOhE0

    If I am honest with myself, I can be equally dedicated by strongly structuring my working life to accommodate getting 15hrs of quality tennis training per week, though I worry about those tough weeks at work where projects go to s**t. That can be mentally draining.
     
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  7. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

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    I wouldn't do it. There are more important things in life. Stick to enjoying tennis for what it is - A hobby.

    BTW I love your serves down the T in that vid. More like 5.0 than 4.0.
     
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  8. samarai

    samarai Rookie

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    With any activity, if you are not playing for money, then u are playing for fun.
     
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  9. millardus

    millardus Rookie

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    It is by far my strongest shot, by far! Even as a young teen I took to it, whereas footwork has always been my Achilles heel. If I want to progress, that is a huge focus area... thankfully not soo necessary for the serve ;-). (Edit here: in case this sounded arrogant, I meant that FOOTWORK isn't so necessary for the serve, as opposed to *my serve is so good it doesn't need attention* haha!)

    It's the reason I'm a better doubles player than singles. Whereas my serve technique is by no means flawless (I drop the left arm very early, toss is not very high), the club coaches do seem to believe I have the best racquet head skill (aside from our premo 3.1 player) when serving, because I can hit slice, top, flat and pretty much place it where I like.

    So, whereas the serve can hack it at quite a high level, the backhand, net game and movement are not even close to that sort of level, particularly in singles. In doubles it's not soo bad, I tend to play big points quite well even when returning...I can hack it back if I need to!

    There's already an interesting response similarity building up..... most people would not do it I'm gathering....... so I wonder what motivates people to do so..... maybe they are already at a very high level and so can see that increments beyond that are extremely challenging and so very rewarding if reached.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2013
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  10. allenkau

    allenkau Rookie

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    If you can squeeze in 3 hrs a day for Tennis... that should be enough to get "GOOD"...

    The full time academy kids don't spend 8 hrs a day on the courts...
     
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  11. bhupaes

    bhupaes Professional

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    A friend of mine in his mid thirties who hits with me once or twice a week has kinda dedicated his time to tennis (but not to the exclusion of work). He is very athletic and fast, and has a decent record in 4.5 USTA singles. He definitely has 5.0 potential - but I think he has to move even faster on the court to get there... I hope he makes it, but I won't be surprised if it's not possible.

    Personally, I've had to take breaks from tennis to deal with work and life... which is okay since the best I could hope to achieve by dedicating my life to tennis would be the dubious distinction of being the best tennis player in my cemetery, and that too is by no means certain... :(

    So all I would say to the OP is to make a balanced decision, and be happy!
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2013
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  12. Venetian

    Venetian Professional

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    Step 1: Continue working for those six months.
    Step 2: Use the money to buy a new car.

    Midlife crisis solved!
     
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  13. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

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    I don't know what you do for a living, but a 6 month gap in work history may come back to haunt you with future employment prospects. Seems like a fairly frivolous risk to me.
     
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  14. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Porche/BMW convertible/Mini Cooper/Fiat are the preferred choices
     
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  15. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Why not work part time.
    I worked part time my entire 4 years of trying to get good at tennis, usually twice a week, pretty much all day, but enough time off to hit the wall for 45 minutes after work.
    Playing full days, 5 days a week, then partial hitting days is plenty for anyone.
    Rode my bike 13 odd miles to work in hilly SanFrancisco, a really bad old 3 speed that weighed over 35 lbs., for exersise.
     
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  16. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    He has a family, you realize that?
     
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  17. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Put wifey and the kids to work.
    If you make a decision that clashes with your later desires, either live with it or change the situation.
    Instead of a dilema, think of it as an opportunity.
     
    #17
  18. Venetian

    Venetian Professional

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    What's to gain from this OP? I could understand if you were, say, a former junior circuit standout that was now 21 years old and single and decided to take a shot at getting a few ATP points just for the experience, or to honestly see how far you could go. But you're a 34 year old married rec player with a job. Why would you sacrifice your job and a portion of your savings to maybe possibly become a slightly better recreational player? Would you take 6 months off of work to try to get better at Words With Friends? This is all risk with no meaningful reward. It confuses me even more because you have no kids and should have plenty of free time to devote to tennis already.
     
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  19. arche3

    arche3 Banned

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    stupid idea. just sayin. get a grip. it is rec tennis.
     
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  20. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

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    Why not just take a 2 week vacation and go to a high end tennis camp? Probably do some good, be fun, and not jeopardize your future.
     
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  21. arche3

    arche3 Banned

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    Much better idea!
     
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  22. bkpr

    bkpr Rookie

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    I have been in the position, but for 2½ years, as a travelling spouse. My wife and I moved to Malaysia for her career, and I went from full-time graphic designer to part-time, then casual/freelance over about 6 months. In the end I was working maybe 10 hours per week on average which led me to pick up tennis. In our situation I was incredibly lucky to not have to work as life in Kuala Lumpur is cheap. And we have no kids.

    Before moving to Malaysia, I'd literally played maybe 50 hours of tennis in my life, without any lessons/training/instruction. With my free time in Malaysia I picked up tennis "seriously", and played ~8–10 hours per week for the last 1½ years, and took 2x 2hr lessons pretty much each week for about 9 months (so cheap!)

    I'm semi-fit but a bit overweight, and went from level whatever-you-are-when-you-start to current strongish 3.5 (with keeping about 6hrs per week tennis since moving to the US 6 months ago.)

    End life story.

    My conclusion: I can't explain how much I love the game of tennis now. It has enriched my life significantly, and I look forward to each upcoming session. I owe that all to the time I had learning and becoming obsessed with Tennis. But I went from a complete novice to ~3.25 in my sabbatical time, and I suspect that was much easier, and a much bigger and more enjoyable improvement than going from 4.0 to 5.0. In saying that, I'm still 100% hungry to improve to the next level. I'm not reaching for a specific ranking, I just want to improve myself and play challenging opponents while I'm still able (I'm 35).

    So I'd say if you can afford it, and it won't hamper employment after your sabbatical, then go for it!

    Caveat: In honesty, I find while getting better, my frustration level is slowly going up when I make simple errors, whereas beforehand I was still "getting the hang of it" and mistakes were fine. If I was a 4.0, I'd probably find a great deal of frustration in those six months. But that could just be me.
     
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  23. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    ..and don't forget, the better you get, pushing real 4.0, the harder it is to find decent competition, practice partners, and especially doubles matches.
    The commitment becomes much greater, taking more time, a little black book, a schedule, and a commitment to that little black book.
    Really tough for free spirits, surfer's, or if you want to be your own man.
    So besides seeing more errors and possible errors, you have to WORK to find a game.
     
    #23
  24. Vilgan

    Vilgan New User

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    What is your commute/work life like? Assuming a 40 hour work week and either a 20 minute commute or one that you can bike to (for fitness sake), work doesn't seem like that much of a blocker.

    Assuming like 10 hours a day for work + commute + getting ready in the morning, 2-3 hours a day for relationship/random stuff, and 8 hours a day sleep, that's still like 3 hours a day for tennis and leaves your entire weekend free to put a solid 6+ hours in each day.

    If you don't like your job.. what about doubling up school/retraining with tennis, as it seems pretty complementary and you'd probably be happier AND might have more to show for it at the end. Worst case, future employers are a lot less likely to question a 6-12 month break "for school" than one where you just play tennis.

    As a fellow DINK, I feel like I definitely could take off 6 months.. but it'd take me twice as much time working to break even due to expenses. So 6 months off would mean the next 12 months would be spent essentially paying for those 6 months w/ progress towards retirement/other stuff halted. YMMV depending on income/expenses/etc of course :)
     
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  25. HughJars

    HughJars Professional

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    My missus would bust open my sack if I said I was taking 6 months off to play tennis. I struggle with getting away for a couple hours of practice. Taking 6 months off work is not an option for me with a mortage and marrigage on the near horizon. Plus I go out of mind not feeling like Im contributing anything to society.

    Saying that though, if I won lotto I would have 2 coaching sessions per day for the rest of my days.

    You gotta way up youre own life - how does not working affect others, like your wife? And, from my experience in recruitment, having a 6 month gap in your resume doesnt bode too well, unless your studying.

    God speed you.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2013
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  26. thejackal

    thejackal Hall of Fame

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    I'm quite a bit younger than you but the same idea occured to me about a year ago. stepped down as VP of a tech startup to focus more on writing and tennis. I've done pretty well at the 4.5 level and play a few open tournaments each year. usually draw D1 players in the first round, so haven't done too well in them unfortunately. my ultimate goal is to be nationally ranked when I'm eligible for ITF seniors (35+). if I make steady progress in the next ten years, I should have a decent shot.

    a few thoughts based on personal experience:

    1) I signed up for one of the better private clubs in the city and met many business contacts, in addition to high-level hitting partners, at the club. have not needed to pay for any lessons in the past year because I've been hitting a lot with nationally ranked juniors (U14 boys and U18 girls) and coaches at the club who need a practice partner to train for tournaments (a lady I often practice with used to have the same coach as max mirnyi back in belarus and had a decent national ranking before stopping at age 18 to go to university).

    2) if you can, go to the club during the middle of the day, around lunch hour. that's when the best juniors and the business executives tend to hit the courts. whether you're looking for better players to hit with, or industry contacts for when you do decide to go back to work, that'd be your best bet. one guy I met recently will sometimes call me for a hitting session in the early afternoon because he has a hard time finding a partner that time of day. considering he was a ATP touring pro, #1 in Canada overall when he was 19 and trained with Agassi at Bollettieri, I'm pretty lucky that he calls me.

    3) how flexible is your wife's work situation? it would be an extreme example, but if possible I would consider moving to another country with a lower cost of living for a few months and training there. when I go to china I hit with former touring pros and pay around $20 USD for court and coaching fee combined per hour. might be a worthwhile thing to look into
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2013
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  27. millardus

    millardus Rookie

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    Out of the house, less chance of chores. Now i think of it, even that is not worth the thousands of pounds lost....!

    Classic aussie humour ;-) . There is always this risk. I know the wife has it on her plan to take 6 months off in about a year and a half, to dedicate to her part time writing, so I thought I might try sneak in there also. But the sack could still be in jeopardy if I usurped her time off. Dangerous.

    Live abt 60 miles from work, take train. From door to door in the morning it is about 80 mins, same at night. 35 hr working week.

    One of the main reasons for the complete break *consideration* is that from personal experience, when work gets *projecty* there is tons of pressure and expecation, and that happens for about 7 months of the year (Admittedly not all in a row), the rest is actually very quiet. But during those busy times, it's very tough to switch off work I find - I've had 3-4 weeks in a row where I have committed to at least 2-3 hrs a day of exercise, diet, tennis....and then the concrete block of work sets in...and things go out the window. Maybe I just need to find out a better way of sectioning work and personal life in those situations.

    But, with all of this, it is inevitably going to be risk v reward...and to become a 4.5 in 6 months....doesn't strike me as enough achievement in a tennis sense.

    Perhaps a longer break (18 months, maybe even 2 years and part time work as LeeD said), at a later stage, where tennis is a major part of it but there are other achievements built in, could be the way to do it.
     
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  28. millardus

    millardus Rookie

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    I work in the Academic sector, one of the renowned Universities worldwide, they are into work-life balance as much as possible so sabbaticals are encouraged. Though you do have to present your case, and a 6 month *tennis* break would be tougher to sell than something more *creative*. Maybe i can wrap it up in some kind of creative bubbly, artsy way........ needs thought.

    It's feeling like a bad idea for the reward tbh....cant say I'm surpised, was my inkling too. Now a 2 year break, that would be awesome!
     
    #28
  29. thejackal

    thejackal Hall of Fame

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    why not use the break to do research or write something?
     
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  30. millardus

    millardus Rookie

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    That is precisely what the University rules allow for sabbaticals. I am in more of a physical pursuits frame of mind at this stage of my life. Further learning, contributions to the wider collective intelligence, that s**t comes later :)

    Today it's superficial beat peoples keesters at tennis hahahaha
     
    #30
  31. Vilgan

    Vilgan New User

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    Can you move closer to work somehow without making it hard on the wife? Cutting that 80 minute commute down to 20 - preferably on a bike instead of sitting, would probably SIGNIFICANTLY increase happiness and provide a lot more time for tennis. I've gone from a 60 minute driving commute 1.5 years ago to a 25 minute walk/light rail commute and it has made a world of difference. A variety of studies suggest that reducing the commute significantly increases happiness even if it results in a smaller house/apartment.
     
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  32. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

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    Ah...way to game the system. Pretty noble.
     
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  33. corbind

    corbind Professional

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    I remember seeing your video before. Love your evil serve.

    You control your life. You live once and can't take anything with you. Money means a whole lot of nothing in the end so follow your heart and enjoy.
     
    #33
  34. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Are you and your wife really on the same page about not having children?

    What will being a better tennis player do for you?

    Will you really be more happy at 4.5 than at 4.0?

    How quickly after returning to work will your tennis prowess fall off?

    Are you getting up now to work out before you go to work so you can concentrate on your tennis in the evening?

    Could you benefit more from your ball machine by working more on your weakest ground stroke and volleying - running to return balls hit far away from your initial position?

    Could you currently fit in several 20 minute sessions practicing your serve each week?

    At 34, and allowing your body to recover from the training an tennis, how many more hours could you really train and play by taking time off, and not start to break down?
     
    #34
  35. millardus

    millardus Rookie

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    Thanx for the input folks, plenty of food for thought.

    Whereas time off work sounds great, and filling it with sport sounds even better, I think I can find better things to do with 6 months or more sabbatical time...

    I will however keep you all posted on my tennis improvement, I'm going to schedule as much training hours during the summer as I can and actually start getting into some Open tournaments.

    Really want to refine some of my tennis technique so it doesn't look quite so *homespun*...
     
    #35
  36. Moz

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  37. millardus

    millardus Rookie

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    Cheers Moz...I have read your stuff, and it was what kinda got my thought processes going.

    6 months is what I could have foreseen in the immediate future, though I would far prefer a longer period. Were I able to set aside 18 months - 24 months, and work towards some significant tennis jumps, I could see real merit.

    But 6 months, just not quite enough I think.

    18 months - 24 months would allow me time to not only seriously improve the tennis, but also focus on another passion, perfecting my German and getting Spanish up to scratch!

    All possible without time off I realise ;-)

    But, to dream of time away from the workplace......... (Pension would take a hit though, darn practicalities of life!!)
     
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  38. Moz

    Moz Hall of Fame

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    I think 6 months would just end up in frustration.

    You could spend 6 months either improving your game technically or 6 months playing tournaments to improve your rating or 6 months getting match fit. You wouldn't be able to do all at once.

    There's a great deal of pressure to play tournaments to meet goals and to make the time off seem "worth it" and to meet ratings goals, however that's not really compatible with developing strokes etc.

    You'll also find that seedings become quite important (it can be the difference between playing once and twice a day which is significant at your age) and it'll take 6 months or so for you to get your ranking points / rating up to the point where you can benefit from them.

    Depending where you live you may well also run into issues with tournament availability which increases the expense and will reduce effective practise time.

    I'd forget people who say 6 months off affects careers. I've taken a number of breaks and it made no difference to my interviewability - it's not the 1960s any more. Taking over 4 years off will have an impact though!!

    To make the most of any time off I'd recommend you put yourself in a physical position to make the most of it (weight, rotator cuff work, flexibility, aerobic background). I'd also focus on any major technical flaws and get some one to one lessons whilst you're earning. Plot a roadmap now and say "I'll have X months off when I have achieved <fitness goals here>, <weight goals here>, <technical goals here> and <financial goals here>.

    Then you can compete effectively in the time you have off. Also, accept that winters really get in the way here and you'd be better off going abroad and training over those months (practise your Spanish perhaps!).

    Finally (!), get your finances in order in the time leading up to it. Pensions are important, but so are fulfilling ambitions.
     
    #38
  39. millardus

    millardus Rookie

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    Spot on, thanks!

    I'd have to agree here. A number of friends of mine have taken year long gaps since their mid-20's.

    Two in particular, now 36, have taken 3 extended breaks from their automotive/Logistics careers since 23 years old. One was 18 months driving 4&4's through South America, one was 12 months driving through Southern Russia, and Currently they are at month 10 of driving their Discovery LR from Warwickshire to Cape Town.... and they have always found their career again on return.

    So that doesn't actually concern me, no.
     
    #39
  40. Thud and blunder

    Thud and blunder Semi-Pro

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    Put me in the 'it's not a great idea, but, hey, it's your life' camp.

    For me, there's a clear distinction in motivation between amateurs and players. If you're a talent, it's all about cracking it or dying trying, maxing out as quickly as possible is the sole emphasis...for an amateur OTOH, it's more about the journey than the destination.

    If you're a 4.25, dissatisfied with aspects of your game,hoping to get to 4.5, if you work your *** off, in 6 months, if everything goes to plan, you'll be a 4.5, dissatisfied with aspects of your game, and hoping to get to 4.75. Maybe you've had some fun in the process, but you're still basically where you were 6 months ago, and the opportunity cost is high.

    Just enjoy the process of trying to improve your game; turbocharging the process won't actually get you anywhere.
     
    #40
  41. NTexas

    NTexas New User

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2012
    Messages:
    72
    I like the idea, but how long will it take to slip back to a lower level of play after you have to go back to work and every day life. i mean you cant keep up the pace of 30 hours of tennis foreever.
     
    #41
  42. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    35,717
    Don't forget, after the age of maybe 25, your body cannot handle the stress and loads of playing tennis 5 days a week with the needed practice to actually improve your skill level, if you're already a 4.0.
     
    #42
  43. skiracer55

    skiracer55 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2007
    Messages:
    2,005
    You don't need to take a sabbatical...

    ...you have enough flex in your schedule to focus on tennis. My guess is, if you actually take a sabbatical, you'll put more pressure than you want on your tennis, because you'll suddenly inherit all kinds of expectations.

    - You can probably achieve a lot in 6 months, but think long term...this 6 months is just a jump start to your eventual tennis goals.

    - Don't restrict yourself to aiming for one NTRP level or another. It's a false god. You want to play NTRP, fine, but you'll find incredible competition and satisfaction in playing your age group, especially if you go to the National events. And definitely play some Open matches, you'll learn more in one Open match than you will playing a season of NTRP matches...
     
    #43
  44. millardus

    millardus Rookie

    Joined:
    May 20, 2011
    Messages:
    117
    Thanks for all the tips guys.

    I am now fully into the Doubles season, and in fact had a league game on Tuesday AND Wednesday this week, ended up being 9 sets of pretty damn good tennis on medium pace courts.

    I must say, I have noticed significant improvements in my mental alertness and shot-making decisions since last season, and I wonder if that must be down to the coaching I have been getting since April 2012, averaging 90 mins coaching every 2 weeks, plus normal practise and playing.

    I Played in a Div1 match (We have 8 Tennis Divisions in our region - maybe 600 000 thousand population, tennis is vibrant here), on Tuesday (I got promoted from Div2 tennis from last year), won a match in 3 sets and lost a match in 2 sets with my 18 year old partner, who is an active LTA 5.2 (usta 4.5). Opposition were at same sort of level, bit more experienced. Was very happy with my confidence levels.

    Then I played a Premier div match on Wed (called in last minute), which is normally an extremely high standard (Normally every 1 of the 8 teams has at least 1 or 2 LTA 3.1 players), and played with a friend similar level to me, around 4.0'ish.

    We absolutely destroyed the opposition who were a blend of LTA 5.2-6.2 players. We won 6-0, 6-1, and 6-3, 6-4.
    In fact, we played as second pair and yet lost fewer games than our first pair, who are LTA 4.2 and 5.1 rated players.

    We were serving soo solidly, got right on top of the net for our attacking volleys, were intercepting anything we could see off each others returns and serves....it was like proper doubles play!

    If I can be feeling this good on a doubles court, with a noticeable difference from last year, by virtue of the coaching I have been getting and my own practise, then things are looking good.

    May not need that tennis break for a bit, until I reach some kind of plateau!!

    Admittedly, this is just my doubles play. singles different ball game!
     
    #44
  45. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,329
    If both partners have a strong serve, doubles is pretty easy!
     
    #45

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