Why buy brand new racquets?

Discussion in 'Classic Racquet Talk' started by looseleftie, May 17, 2013.

  1. tennisplayer1993

    tennisplayer1993 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2012
    Messages:
    703
    Location:
    All Around The World
    I actually prefer my rackets from the early 2000s over the new rackets I've tried in recent years. I tend to use these rackets and just string on natural gut/alu power on them and I feel that I get the best touch with it.

    My favorite set up of all time is probably the Pure Drive Team Plus (2003) with bb alu power/old vs team. String it around 55 lbs and the racket was like a rocket launcher. Won two straight set matches with it until my coach asked for it back (my racket was in the shop).
     
    #51
  2. ForLoveOfTheGame

    ForLoveOfTheGame Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2013
    Messages:
    570
    Location:
    on a pale blue dot
    A pro once told me that with heavy repeated use, the fibers in the racket break down over time. Maybe not in years, but in decades. I question whether this is possible, but depending on the material composite, maybe? Guess an engineer would know best.
     
    #52
  3. blitzmage_89

    blitzmage_89 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2007
    Messages:
    266
    The more appropriate term is that the fibers get deformed over time. Everytime you hit the ball, the strings constrict the racket a little bit. Graphite is a softer material hence they wear down easier compared to the newer composite racquets. That's why you get a "loose" feeling when you play with an extremely used racquet.

    This is probably the least of your worries with new racquets though. The composite material is tighter and more solid compared to the racquets of the late 90s and early 2000s. Even if you frequently play it would take years before you can feel the "wearing out" of the racquet.

    The concept of "wearing out" is probably not a good excuse to keep on changing racquets every year though. There's no harm in buying 1 to 2 year old racquets. The "wear down" is practically negligible. You can just spend the $120 you saved on tennis lessons or actual games.

    I never bought a racquet above $50. There are plenty of old men in my club who buy new racquets (even two) on a yearly basis. I just buy their old racquets when they no longer want it anymore. Last one I bought was an Aeropro GT for just $30.

    Buying new racquets frequently aren't really a good investment. Tennis racquets depreciate quickly.
     
    #53
  4. yonexRx32

    yonexRx32 Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2011
    Messages:
    261
    Yes, an engineer would know better than a tennis pro about structural properties. The tennis pro is probably best qualified to comment on how a racket plays.

    The fibers do not break. All current rackets are made using a thermoset process in which tows of carbon fibers are encased in an epoxy resin. Think of it as of the way reinforced concrete is made: cement surrounds bundles of metal. The epoxy resin is a brittle material. Over hundreds of thousands of shocks, the epoxy develops micro fractures. This in turns allows the fibers flex more and to leads to the softening of the frame.

    Injection molded rackets, on the other hand, use mostly nylon, which is amorphous, more elastic, and does not develop micro fractures. It is more difficult to crack a Dunlop Max 200g than it is to crack a new Wilson Blade.
     
    #54
  5. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2009
    Messages:
    999
    Location:
    the Netherlands
    Interesting info....Is the nylon additive the reason why IMF's deform more easily, cannot exceed a 90 sq.inch head size and warp when left in high temperatures?
     
    #55
  6. yonexRx32

    yonexRx32 Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2011
    Messages:
    261
    Nylon is not an additive.. it is the main material of the racket. And yes, nylon is a thermoplastic, which means rackets will be more sensitive to high temperatures than thermoset ones. The dunlop 500i and 800i are 95 sq in. Not sure where the 90 sq in. limit is coming from. I don't know of any 500i warping.. but it's not impossible..if you stick it in the oven it will probably warp.
     
    #56
  7. vsbabolat

    vsbabolat Legend

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    8,843
    1988 was Kneissl with the Spark series. Voelkl subcontracted in Asia 1993 and Fischer was 1995.
     
    #57
  8. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2006
    Messages:
    1,909
    Quite right; I had forgotten abuot the Kneissl Spark, from Singapore (which was introduced in 1987; I had some of the first Spark 25's made available in the US and HATED them).

    Not to split hairs, but I do have it on good authority that Fischer started outsourcing to Taiwan Strong in 1993.
     
    #58
  9. vsbabolat

    vsbabolat Legend

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    8,843
    Oh ok. I thought the Vacuum Pro 90 and Vacuum Pro 98 did not switch over until 1995.
     
    #59
  10. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2009
    Messages:
    999
    Location:
    the Netherlands
    I thought the 500i and 800i were 90 sq.inch but you are probably right about their head size.
    I noticed that some of the 500i and 800i models did deform during stringing if done uncarefully. The 200G did warp rather easily when left in a car on a hot sunny day.
     
    #60
  11. yonexRx32

    yonexRx32 Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2011
    Messages:
    261
    In the 90's, in TX, I saw quite a few regular rackets bent out of shape for being left in the car. I don't know if more recent rackets are heat resistant to the point of being able to leave them in the car on a hot summer day. I don't take that risk no matter what racket I use. The way I look at it; special rackets, like special cars, take special care. I always string my Max 200g at 55 or below and have never had any warping. I also use a six mounting points stringer.
     
    #61
  12. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2009
    Messages:
    999
    Location:
    the Netherlands
     
    #62
  13. yonexRx32

    yonexRx32 Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2011
    Messages:
    261
    The Stringway is not available in the US. It is also much more expensive than I am willing to pay. The mounting system on my table top (Gamma) is very similar in fact to the Stringway. The frame has a little freedom to deform but not excessively. The two point mount I was using previously tended to make the racket heads round. That has gone away with the new mounting system.
     
    #63
  14. floydcouncil

    floydcouncil Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Messages:
    691
    So...you WANT your 200g to look like a lollipop from deformation?
     
    #64

Share This Page