Why did Muster only win 1 French open

Discussion in 'Former Pro Player Talk' started by The_Begum_of_Bhopal, Feb 20, 2014.

  1. The_Begum_of_Bhopal

    The_Begum_of_Bhopal Rookie

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    He seemed so consistent on clay but only won 1 French open and made 1 semi final
     
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  2. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    Muster's form in the first half of 1991 was terrible. In 1992 and 1993, he lost to Courier both times. In 1994, he lost to a serve and volleyer in Rafter, and Muster was always vulnerable to serve and volleyers due to the fact that passing shots weren't his strongest point. In 1996, he was flat against Stich, never got going with his footwork, and it was one of the biggest upsets of the decade at the majors. In 1997, terrible clay-court form for him that year but lost a winnable match to eventual champion, Kuerten.
     
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  3. The_Begum_of_Bhopal

    The_Begum_of_Bhopal Rookie

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    to an extent was muster a bit like pre Lendl Murray - consistent outside of the slams, winning lots of masters, but vulnerable in the slams.
     
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  4. 90's Clay

    90's Clay Legend

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    1990 Muster was solid I think. '91 his form was off. 95 French Open arguably is the HIGHEST Level ever in the men's game on clay next to 2008 Nadal.

    Losing to Peak Courier in 92 and 93 on clay is nothing to scoff at as Peak Courier on clay is one of the best to ever play on the surface

    The field on clay in the 90s was strong. MANY great clay court players littered throughout the draws. Its not like the last 10 years where you have 3 or 4 solid dirt ballers and then a field full of inept clowns who have no clue how to play on clay
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2014
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  5. treblings

    treblings Hall of Fame

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    sure he was consistent on clay. but outside 95 he wasn´t consistently the best player on clay:)
    without the 95 season, most people wouldn´t remember him today
     
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  6. Vegito

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    Very similar to Guillermo Vilas. Even in that.
     
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  7. Mainad

    Mainad Talk Tennis Guru

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    Pre-Lendl Murray was still far more successful at the Slams than Muster was. Prior to winning his first Slam, Murray had already made 4 Grand Slam finals (and has made 3 more to date). Muster's French Open win was the only time he ever made a Grand Slam final.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2014
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  8. hoodjem

    hoodjem G.O.A.T.

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    Was there a Borg-equivalent around for Muster to play second fiddle to?
     
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  9. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    In 1996, Muster was 46-3 on clay, by far the best of the year, despite the French Open upset.

    Muster and Vilas are similar in terms of tennis style. They are also the only players who resemble Nadal in playing style.
     
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  10. dominikk1985

    dominikk1985 Legend

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    he peaked late so his window of opportunity was not big.
     
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  11. Bobby Jr

    Bobby Jr Legend

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    And yet most French Open titles in the 90s were won by players who were very poor achievers at all the other majors.

    Similarly, of FO champions in the 90s Agassi alone could be regarded as a top tier player overall.

    So, was it lack of competition or the more likely scenario that clay was dominated by people who were highly specialised on it and couldn't rate much anywhere else? The later seems more plausible given their achievements off clay.
     
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  12. timnz

    timnz Legend

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    1996

    In 1985 and 1986 - Muster was clocking up insane levels of clay court wins. The problem was in 1996 he ran into Michael Stich at the French Open. Sampras will tell you that Stich was the most talented guy out there, who could beat anyone. It is just that he didn't always play his best...but at the French Open that year he did. The other factor in 1996 was the heat. The tournament was playing the fastest it had in years. It was no co-incidence that that year was Sampras' best showing (the Semi's) at the French open.
     
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  13. treblings

    treblings Hall of Fame

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    he had a very good first half of the year that ended in Paris.
    his five tournament wins in the build-up to Roland Garros where
    certainly impressive. i for one was hoping at that time, that he would win the French again.
    winning these 5 tournaments, he only had to beat one top ten player though.
     
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  14. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    In Stuttgart in July 1996, he thrashed the French Open champion, Kafelnikov, in 3 straight sets. I've seen that match many times, and it was even more one-sided than the scoreline suggests.
     
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  15. treblings

    treblings Hall of Fame

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    I agree with you, that he had a very good clay court season in 96. i´m sure you´re right, that he had the best match record of the year.
     
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  16. jean pierre

    jean pierre Professional

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    Yes, but Vilas played 3 finals.And was very very unlucky against Wilander.
     
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  17. morten

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    Strong era... Probably the strongest
     
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  18. McLovin

    McLovin Hall of Fame

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    I think you are all looking at it the wrong way:

    I think it was an amazing achievement for Muster to have won the French Open. Consider this: 4 years into his professional career he was hit by a drunk driver and had ligaments in his knee severed. For 99% of professional athletes, that injury would result in an end to a career. For more than half of the remaining 1%, that would mean a constant struggle, where they are shells of their former selves.

    But not only did Muster return from that injury, he managed to win a major and become the #1 player in the world. Pretty damn impressive if you ask me.
     
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  19. big ted

    big ted Hall of Fame

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    he expended so much energy when he played maybe he was just better at the smaller best of 3 set one week events. also he didnt really have a huge weapon like couriers or lendls forehand did he
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2014
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  20. The_Begum_of_Bhopal

    The_Begum_of_Bhopal Rookie

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    What i find difficult to understand is why he could occasionally dominate the clay season yet fail to make an impact at French, aside from a semi-final and a win.
     
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  21. Kalin

    Kalin Hall of Fame

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    As McLovin said, Muster had to go through a horrific injury the consequences of which, given his grueling playing style, must have stayed with him forever.
     
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  22. Mainad

    Mainad Talk Tennis Guru

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    At first I thought it might have been because the best of 5 format didn't suit him, especially after his serious injury. But, given that he won all 8 of his Masters titles in best of 5 format, that can't be the case. So it does seem a bit of a puzzle especially given his long periods of dominance on clay!
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2014
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  23. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    Muster only dominated clay in 1995 and 1996. For most of his career, he was very good on clay, but tended to underachieve at the biggest clay tournaments. He was, however, a very good big match player in finals and Davis Cup.
     
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  24. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    Muster essentialy depended on his great form, similar to Lendl but less talent
    So he really couldn't win more than one
     
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  25. Mainad

    Mainad Talk Tennis Guru

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    But he was 3 times a winner at MC and Rome, 2 of the biggest clay tournaments after RG. The only really big clay tournament he didn't win was Hamburg for some odd reason (he never even made a final there).
     
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  26. mattennis

    mattennis Hall of Fame

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    It was a different era back then. Many different players could play very very well on clay. In 1990 Muster won Rome and was runner-up in Monte Carlo (he also won several other clay tournaments) but in Roland Garros he lost in the SF against a great Andres Gomez, who won the tournament defeating Agassi in the final.

    In 1992 and 1993 he lost to Courier in Roland Garros. Courier was a beast back then.

    In 1994 he lost to Rafter in R16. Very "bad luck", because Rafter had the perfect serve-and-volley game to bother Muster even on clay.

    In 1996 he lost to Stich in R16. Stich was one of the most talented players of that time, played an all-court game and that day he was in the zone.

    In 1997 he lost to Kuerten (who won the tournament) in five sets in R32.

    In 1998 he lost to Mantilla in the QF.

    He "could" have won possibly a second French Open here or there.

    But the 90s was a totally different era. There were many many different good players that could defeat anyone on any given day.

    Poly strings (and homogeneization of courts and playing styles) changed that completely. When everybody play more or less the same top-spin baseline game, the better ones will win almost always.

    When you had totally different competitive games (Stich, Rafter, Courier, Muster....they played totally different in general and also on clay, even Muster and Courier, being both baseliners, played totally different) anything could happen.
     
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  27. Top Jimmy

    Top Jimmy Semi-Pro

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    Getting run over by a car can never help one's career.
     
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  28. fezer

    fezer Rookie

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    Muster was really dominant only during 95&96 clay court season. and even then there were dangerous players for him in the mix. s&v players like rafter and stich always gave him trouble. he had a lucky win over becker in monte carlo. he never won a match vs edberg (no matter what surface). agassi & sampras also had good chances vs muster. so he had his major title, which he certainly deserves. but to me he is totally overrated. how can a player be called great, who never won a single match @wimbledon?
    neverthelesse it is impressing how he came back after that horrible accident in miami!
     
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  29. Rosewall

    Rosewall Rookie

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    I disagree. Like most lefties, I thought Muster had a ton of feel to his game and thought he had great hands. I remember him looking really comfortable -- almost like an all court play -- on hard courts. His slice serve out wide to righty's backhand in the ad court was McEnroesque.

    Lendl never looked comfortable taking a ball out of the air unless it was an easy put away. Rarely would you ever see him do anything special with the volley. And he didn't have to. He was the best grip-and-rip player there has ever been. The only touch and imagination I saw was a very good topspin lob.

    Lendl also had the best footwork in mens tennis. It was so fanatically perfect, that his forehand and backhand mechanics looked the exact same every time regardless -- hence his reputation as a robot. It didn't matter if the pace of the ball was fast or slow or whether he had to take it on the rise from the baseline or move in to take a short ball, same balance, same mechancs. That doesn't happen without amazing footwork. And that footwork doesn't happen without incredible fitness.
     
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  30. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    Here is the full list of Thomas Muster's clay-court matches in those two years.

    Thomas Muster clay-court results in 1995
    1995 Mexico City
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Nicolas Pereira (6-2, 6-1)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Leonardo Lavalle (6-4, 6-1)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Oscar Martinez (7-6, 6-1)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Francisco Clavet (7-6, 1-6, 6-2)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Fernando Meligeni (7-6, 7-5)

    1995 Estoril
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Oscar Martinez (6-4, 6-1)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Franco Davin (7-5, 6-1)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Javier Sanchez (4-6, 7-6, 6-4)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Emilio Sanchez (6-2, 6-4)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Albert Costa (6-4, 6-2)

    1995 Barcelona
    Round of 64: Thomas Muster def. Jordi Burillo (4-6, 7-6, 6-2)
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Andrei Cherkasov (6-3, 6-2)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Javier Sanchez (7-6, 6-4)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Carlos Costa (6-3, 3-6, 7-5)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Yevgeny Kafelnikov (6-3, 6-3)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Magnus Larsson (6-2, 6-1, 6-4)

    1995 Monte Carlo Masters
    Round of 64: Thomas Muster def. Guy Forget (6-2, 6-2)
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Bernd Karbacher (6-2, 6-2)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Alberto Berasategui (7-6, 6-2)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. David Wheaton (6-4, 6-4)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Andrea Gaudenzi (6-3, 7-6)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Boris Becker (4-6, 5-7, 6-1, 7-6, 6-0)

    1995 Rome Masters
    Round of 64: Thomas Muster def. Paul Haarhuis (6-4, 6-4)
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Jan Siemerink (3-6, 6-4, 6-3)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Bohdan Ulihrach (6-2, 6-2)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Michael Chang (6-3, 6-2)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Wayne Ferreira (3-6, 6-1, 6-3)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Sergi Bruguera (3-6, 7-6, 6-2, 6-3)

    1995 French Open
    Round of 128: Thomas Muster def. Gerard Solves (3-6, 6-4, 6-2, 6-1)
    Round of 64: Thomas Muster def. Cedric Pioline (6-1, 6-3, 6-3)
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Carlos Costa (6-3, 7-5, 6-2)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Andrei Medvedev (6-3, 6-3, 6-0)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Albert Costa (6-2, 3-6, 6-7, 7-5, 6-2)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Yevgeny Kafelnikov (6-4, 6-0, 6-4)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Michael Chang (7-5, 6-2, 6-4)

    1995 St. Poelten
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Filip Dewulf (4-6, 7-6, 6-3)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Alex Lopez Moron (6-2, 6-2)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Rodolphe Gilbert (6-2, 6-2)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Stefano Pescosolido (6-0, 3-6, 6-4)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Bohdan Ulihrach (6-3, 3-6, 6-1)

    1995 Gstaad
    Round of 32: Alex Corretja def. Thomas Muster (7-5, 6-1)

    1995 Stuttgart Outdoor
    Round of 64: BYE
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Marcelo Rios (6-2, 6-4)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Bernd Karbacher (6-4, 6-2)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Tomas Carbonell (6-2, 6-0)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Sergi Bruguera (6-7, 7-6, 6-2)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Jan Apell (6-2, 6-2)

    1995 Amsterdam
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Martin Sinner (6-2, 6-3)
    Round of 16: Marcelo Filippini def. Thomas Muster (Walkover)

    1995 Kitzbuhel
    Round of 64: BYE
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Steve Campbell (6-3, 6-3)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Frederik Fetterlein (6-3, 6-3)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Sandor Noszaly (7-6, 6-3)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Gilbert Schaller (6-2, 6-7, 6-3)
    Final: Albert Costa def. Thomas Muster (4-6, 6-4, 7-6, 2-6, 6-4)

    1995 San Marino
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Marcelo Filippini (6-4, 6-2)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Felix Mantilla (6-3, 6-2)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Adrian Voinea (7-6, 2-6, 6-4)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Stefano Pescosolido (6-4, 6-2)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Andrea Gaudenzi (6-2, 6-0)

    1995 Umag
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Roberto Carretero (6-2, 3-0 ret.)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Alejo Mancisidor (6-3, 6-1)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Jordi Arrese (6-1, 6-3)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Francisco Clavet (7-5, 5-7, 7-6)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Carlos Costa (3-6, 7-6, 6-4)

    1995 Bucharest
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Tomas Carbonell (6-4, 6-4)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Cedric Pioline (7-5, 6-3)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Arnaud Boetsch (6-4, 6-4)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Sandor Noszaly (6-2, 6-2)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Gilbert Schaller (6-3, 6-4)

    Clay-court win-loss record for 1995: 65-2

    Thomas Muster clay-court results in 1996
    1996 Mexico City
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Juan Albert Viloca-Puig (6-4, 6-4)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Luis Lobo (7-6, 6-2)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Alejandro Hernandez (6-4, 6-4)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Francisco Clavet (6-3, 2-6, 6-1)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Jiri Novak (7-6, 6-2)

    1996 Estoril
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. David Rikl (6-1, 7-5)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Carlos Moya (6-4, 6-2)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Francisco Clavet (6-4, 6-2)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Alex Corretja (6-7, 6-4, 6-0)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Andrea Gaudenzi (7-6, 6-4)

    1996 Barcelona
    Round of 64: BYE
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Alex Corretja (6-1, 6-3)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Bohdan Ulihrach (6-4, 7-5)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Francisco Roig (6-1, 6-1)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Carlos Moya (4-6, 6-2, 6-4)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Marcelo Rios (6-3, 4-6, 6-4, 6-1)

    1996 Monte Carlo Masters
    Round of 64: BYE
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Tomas Carbonell (7-5, 6-4)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Carlos Moya (6-2, 7-6)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Sjeng Schalken (5-7, 6-1, 6-4)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Cedric Pioline (6-3, 6-3)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Albert Costa (6-3, 5-7, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2)

    1996 Munich
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Stefano Pescosolido (6-1, 6-1)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Hendrik Dreekmann (4-6, 6-2, 7-5)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Mark Philippoussis (6-3, 0-6, 6-2)
    Semi Final: Carlos Moya def. Thomas Muster (6-3, 6-3)

    1996 Rome Masters
    Round of 64: Thomas Muster def. Herbert Wiltschnig (6-3, 6-0)
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Petr Korda (6-2, 6-3)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Todd Martin (1-6, 6-4, 6-2)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Marcelo Rios (6-3, 6-2)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Albert Costa (6-3, 3-6, 6-4)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Richard Krajicek (6-2, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3)

    1996 St. Poelten
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Nasser-Ghanim Al-Khulaifi (6-0, 6-1)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Marc-Kevin Goellner (6-7, 6-4, 7-6)
    Quarter Final: Andrea Gaudenzi def. Thomas Muster (Walkover)

    1996 French Open
    Round of 128: Thomas Muster def. Frederik Fetterlein (6-4, 6-2, 6-4)
    Round of 64: Thomas Muster def. Gerard Solves (6-1, 6-3, 6-0)
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Adrian Voinea (6-2, 5-2 ret.)
    Round of 16: Michael Stich def. Thomas Muster (4-6, 6-4, 6-1, 7-6)

    1996 Stuttgart Outdoor
    Round of 64: BYE
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Marcos Aurelio Gorriz (7-6, 7-6)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Galo Blanco (6-3, 6-0)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Francisco Clavet (6-2, 6-4)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Alberto Berasategui (6-3, 6-3)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Yevgeny Kafelnikov (6-2, 6-2, 6-4)

    1996 Kitzbuhel
    Round of 64: BYE
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Emilio Sanchez (6-3, 6-3)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Mariano Zabaleta (6-1, 6-2)
    Quarter Final: Emilio Benfele Alvarez def. Thomas Muster (6-1, 7-5)

    1996 Bogota
    Round of 32: Thomas Muster def. Franco Squillari (6-4, 6-3)
    Round of 16: Thomas Muster def. Bryan Shelton (6-4, 6-4)
    Quarter Final: Thomas Muster def. Ramon Delgado (2-6, 6-1, 7-5)
    Semi Final: Thomas Muster def. Lucas Arnold Ker (6-1, 6-7, 6-3)
    Final: Thomas Muster def. Nicolas Lapentti (6-7, 6-2, 6-3)

    Clay-court win-loss record for 1996: 46-3
    Clay-court win-loss record for 1995-1996 combined: 111-5
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2015
    #30
  31. Legend of Borg

    Legend of Borg Legend

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    Why did he win only 1 French Open?






    Because that's all he could Muster.....
     
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  32. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    treblings, you seem to be a very objective Austrian...
     
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  33. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    kiki, Here I can agree again. They even said that Skoff was more talented than him.
     
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  34. jaggy

    jaggy G.O.A.T.

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    I like it....but don't quit your day job!
     
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  35. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    Top Jimmy, Yes, but to be exact: Muster stood directly behind his car when another car pushed his car a bit backwards and hurt Thomas.
     
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  36. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    Mustard, Thanks a lot. Altogether Muster was awesome in these years.
     
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  37. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    of all the austrian players of the 90´s, the one I´d lean towards more would be Alex Antonisch.And Peter Feigl, but he played in the 70´s.
     
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  38. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    Lendl a good footwork??? I severely disagree.
     
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  39. morten

    morten Hall of Fame

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    I agree kiki, Lendl is marginally better than the clumsy Raonic as far as footwork, now fitness is something else, Lendl was fit.
     
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  40. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    yes, Lendl was fit and because of his fitness programs he became fast on court.But that is not what footwork means
     
    #40
  41. treblings

    treblings Hall of Fame

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    thanks Bobby. but mustard was right, the 96 season was formidable as well.
    only, people seem to remember the GS victories more than everything else.
     
    #41
  42. treblings

    treblings Hall of Fame

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    i disagree with people, who think Muster wasn´t as talented as his austrian compatriots of that era.
    his work ethic and ability to push himself and believe in himself where his biggest assets. he was highly talented in that regard, and it overshadowed his other talents as a player
    what i find very sad is, that his accident prevented him to be successful on hardcourt as well as on clay. his knee didn´t allow him to play the full hardcourt season
     
    #42
  43. treblings

    treblings Hall of Fame

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    Feigl was certainly not as talented as Muster but he was delightful to watch.
    i had the privilege to play against him once, and even lead in the match, but not for long:)
     
    #43
  44. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    Muster had a really intense rivalry with Skoff for a good while.
     
    #44
  45. Rosewall

    Rosewall Rookie

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    Well, you would be wrong then.
     
    #45
  46. PrinceMoron

    PrinceMoron Hall of Fame

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    Those Mizuno shoes were a nightmare. Lucky to be able to even walk.
     
    #46
  47. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    No love for Hansi Kary?
    Played like Skoff
     
    #47
  48. treblings

    treblings Hall of Fame

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    lots of love for Hans:)
    met him at the Stadthalle tournament last october.
    he was looking for his car in the parking garage. i couldn´t help him. couldn´t find mine either:oops:
    i´ll throw in Peter Pokorny - master senior player
     
    #48
  49. heninfan99

    heninfan99 G.O.A.T.

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    Doesn't sound like a weak era. Very tough ear, indeed. Those are tough opponents.
     
    #49
  50. Rosewall

    Rosewall Rookie

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    Didn't have time yesterday to post more on Lendl's footwork... I distinguish between agility and footwork. Lendl was hardly the most agile guy. Relative to Muster, Lendl was stiff. When he came to the net to volley, he was a waste bender - very little flex in the knees. On the short, slick Wimbledon grass, that stiffness made him look very uncomfortable. That lack of agility extended to his hands where he had trouble handling bad turf bounces and skids and preferred not to have to volley.

    On surfaces where he had sure or at least predictable (clay) footing, he dominated. Mechanically, his footwork was incredible as evidenced by the precision of his ground strokes even on the full running stretch.

    Lendl was a rhythm player. The guys that messed with him a bit (Chang, McEnroe, Brad Pearce at one Wimbledon quarterfinal) took pace off the ball or frequently changed tactics to frustrate any attempt at getting into a rhythm.
     
    #50

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