Why do people hybrid with gut in the mains

Discussion in 'Strings' started by puck1230, Jan 8, 2012.

  1. NE1for10is?

    NE1for10is? Semi-Pro

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    I wonder if candlewax on the gut mains before stringing the crosses would work. A stringer once told me to do this to avoid breaking the gut.

    Regarding the Fingerease, I just saw this on a guitar post, so be careful about applying it:

    <<The manufacturer clearly warns against skin contact. They also note
    that their product is an eye irritant, is flammable and that inhaling the
    product can be harmful or fatal. Unless I read it incorrectly the
    ingredients are said to include dimethylpolysiloxane [a polymer of
    silicone], naphtha and liquefied petroleum gas.>>
     
  2. 2Hare

    2Hare Semi-Pro

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    I'm pretty sure skin contact is fine, it's for guitar strings after all. Would be pretty hard to play guitar without skin contact haha. On the bottle it only warn of inhaling concentrated gas may be harmful and it's flammable. It doesn't say anything about skin contact or even eye irritant. May be the bottle is lying to me, I dunno.


    Maui19 speaks of wisdom here. Absolutely agree! Some people mistaken loss of spins from mains not snapping back as poly gone "dead". It's actually just the friction increased through wear and tear of gut. Lubricants could help you revive this situation. Stringing gut mains at higher tension relative to poly crosses could help to prevent this from happening for longer.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2012
  3. volusiano

    volusiano Hall of Fame

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    Below are some excerpt from the Performaxx website about stringing and string care when it comes to Carnauba wax. What he said makes a lot of sense about the wax helping with the lubrication when hot from friction when being pulled during stringing, but doesn't make the clamping slippery. However, I haven't tried waxing it before stringing, so I can't vouch for it.

    He also mentions candle wax (parafin), but he says it doesn't stick to the string.

    The part about wiping the string with a damp cloth is interesting, because I thought that you're not supposed to get your string wet. But it does make sense that you'd want to wipe off the dirt after a session. So I'd only make sure that after wiping it off with a damp cloth, to dry it out right away with a dry cloth.

    I went out and bought a can of Carnauba Turtle car wax at Target last night and put it on and went out to practice some serve, and the balls just flied. I think he's right about it making the string bed being far livelier. Maybe the wax reduces string friction where they cross and therefore promotes more movement hence a livelier string bed.

    Target has the Meguiar Premium Carnauba car wax for $11, but it has some special additive in there specific for the car (hence the premium price, I guess). Since he said pure Carnauba, I decided to go with the cheaper Turtle Carnauba wax for only $6.30.

    "Cutting or burning the string during installation.
    The best way to avoid this is good technique. The simple fact is when strings are drawn across each other the combination of friction and motion creates heat, often enough to notch and weaken the string. Minimize this by weaving the crosses using a loop method rather than pulling the sting in a straight line across the racket. All you have to do is make use of the open area toward the racket throat to weave in a loop and then slowly pull out the slack. This both minimizes frictional heat and spreads the heat buildup over a wide area avoiding problems. In the past, we always applied a thin coat of wax to any string to act as a protective lubricant during stringing; it was a must for gut.
    A little tech talk is useful here. You want the string to slip when it is in motion, but not slip in the clamp. Therefore, oils like silicone are a no-no. They make the strings very slippery all the time and force you to put excessive clamp pressure on the string to keep it from slipping, "catch 22." Wax is normally a solid so when you clamp on it the friction against the string can actually be enhanced. But, when the string slides, the wax melts and becomes a slippery oil. It works for you both ways. I prefer pure carnauba because it sticks to the string. Some recommend paraffin; it is cheap and is available in the canning section of virtually any super market. The down side is it does not stick to the string.

    Keep the string clean
    If you wipe the string down with a damp cloth after every session it will remove most of the grit that destroys strings. Then apply a thin coat of a top quality Carnauba car wax (I prefer Mother's®.) It lubricates the cross points and also fills the tiny micro cracks which develop in ANY string coating, protecting against water. You will also find the string bed is far livelier. The resulting improvement in string durability and performance life are dramatic and well worth the minimal bother."
     
  4. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Thank you!!

    What poly will give me the liveliest ball with my gut? I don't have any Pro line left and I need to get strung before I leave this week.
     
  5. Maui19

    Maui19 Hall of Fame

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    Take a look at the lowest friction polys here and see what your stringer has in stock:

    http://twu.tennis-warehouse.com/learning_center/COFreporter.php

    Any of the top 10 polys will produce similarly excellent results.

    FWIW, IMO (sorry for the back to back acronyms) shaped strings actually slide better and preserve the gut longer than smooth polys.

    Good luck and have fun in Denver. I've got a lot of family there and they love it there.
     
  6. Maui19

    Maui19 Hall of Fame

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    I have used the Dupont teflon dry lubricant and the increase in spin is noticeable.

    But don't breathe the stuff.
     
  7. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Thanks, Maui. I'll print this out and take it with me to the stringer. Who will undoubtedly think I have lost my mind. :)

    I went out this afternoon in the cold to see whether I could get some decent spin out of the gut. It is tough. I had to change my swingpath and dangle part of my hand off the grip to get more racket head speed, and I don't think that is sustainable.

    As weird as this sounds, I may stick with one racket = gut and one = hybrid for a while. My elbow does feel better already, so I could use the gut for practice and the hybrid for matches.
     
  8. catfish

    catfish Semi-Pro

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    I would suggest you give the gut some time. Gut is very arm friendly because of the elasticity. But it does take a few hours to break in and give you that gut feel.

    Just curious, what brand of gut did you use?
     
  9. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

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    cindy when I was 10 I could hit with topspin with prince syn gut.

    My point is that you can get the top you want, maybe just have to work a little harder.

    For inspiration watch some old Michael Chang footage. He got rather nice top with a 100 loaded with full gut.

    Full gut is awesome. you are driving a Cadillac now. Its a little slower and there are blindspots, but you will get used to it.
     
  10. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Catfish, I used Babolat VS 17 ay 57 for the full gut job.

    I dunno, PowerPlayer. I hit with the gut again today, just some groundstroke practice with a friend. This would be the sixth hour of hitting with the gut job.

    Still didn't like it very much. As you say, I have to work harder to get the same spin. Which means whenever I am in less than an ideal position/balance, the ball will fly on me because I need everything perfect to get the contact point and head speed for topspin.

    So I switched back to my other racket, which still has a gut/poly hybrid. O, effortless topspin!

    Because I need to get something I can hit with for this tournament this week, I went to the stringer to get my gut/poly hybrid restrung. I talked to the stringer about my many issues. I settled on Babolat VS 17 with Blast 16. I would have preferred Blast 17, but I had to go with what was in stock.

    Anyway, he is stringing the gut at 55 and the poly at 50 (his idea). He said that was the most arm-friendly thing that he can do in a hybrid given what I'm used to. And he lectured me about the elbow risks of using a poly at all.

    So I will use the gut racket for practices and drills, and I'll reserve the hybrid for matches. I didn't find the transition from the gut to the hybrid during my practice session threw me off at all. If anything, using the gut helped me hit even better with the hybrid. In other words, I was working hard to get topspin with the gut, so picking up the hybrid and hitting with that meant I was really dialed in.
     
  11. Maui19

    Maui19 Hall of Fame

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    That sounds like an awesome setup. I am guessing you will really like it.

    My experience has been that the smaller gauge crosses tend to cut into the gut mains more than the larger gauges. I also noticed that the pros play mostly 16 and 15 gauges, so I am headed in that direction. My crosses are at 17 right now, and when I buy more string, I'm going to 16 gauge for my crosses. (Sorry if I already posted this here. I know I posted it somewhere and I just cant recall where.)
     
  12. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    I got decent spin from Wilson natty which is supposedly the old VS.
     
  13. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    I asked him about the 16 in the crosses because I have never used 16. I was worried that it wouldn't grab the ball.

    He said the reason 16 is better is that many people feel the ball flies too much with 17 poly in the crosses because there is slightly more trampoline effect. Don't know if that's true, but that's what he said.

    I think he was kind of, erm, surprised to have an older lady like me walk into this snazzy country club pro shop armed with a printout of hybrid friction ratings and saying she's not getting enough spin with her gut. While I was talking to him, another lady came in to return the huge demo racket she had borrowed. She said it made a funny sound, and he pointed out that it had no dampener. Problem solved! :)
     
  14. catfish

    catfish Semi-Pro

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    I use Babolat Tonic quite a bit. I found that it takes a little more time to break in than Klip Legend or Pacific Classic...... especially at a higher tension. I used to string in the low 50's, but I switched to a more powerful racquet this fall due to an injury. Stringing at 55/53 works better for this racquet. I'm not sure if Babolat VS has the same characteristics as the Tonic, but I think it's pretty similar. Maybe try stringing it at a lower tension next time.

    I honestly think that if you give the gut more time you'll like it. It will loosen up more or break in, whatever you want to call it. It will get softer and you'll feel it almost grab the tennis ball. It's hard to describe, but nothing else plays like gut and your arm will be very happy. I try hybrids every now and then thinking I may like them as well as gut, but I never do. However,I know that strings are a personal preference. What works for me may not be to your liking.
     
  15. fortun8son

    fortun8son Hall of Fame

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    It should be just fine for the tournament.
    Hard to say how long the RPM will continue to perform, though.
    Best guess-not long.
    Unfortunately, most stringers are not willing to change crosses only.
     
  16. volusiano

    volusiano Hall of Fame

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    I thought most people said that the Babolat VS needs no breaking in at all, compared to some other guts, no? So I'm surprised to hear that the Tonic takes some breaking in, even longer that Klip. I thought that the Tonic is the same material as the VS, only that it doesn't meet the high stringent quality inspection (maybe the gauge is less consistent), so they repackage and sell it at a lower price than VS, that's all.
     
  17. catfish

    catfish Semi-Pro

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    I have not found that to be true. I find Babolat takes longer to break in, but once it breaks in it maintains playability and tension better than the others. I can keep Babolat in my racquet for several months. Klip Legend breaks in faster, but doesn't seem to maintain it's tension for quite as long. Pacific Classic is stiffer than Klip or Babolat, and falls somewhere in the middle as far as break in and maintaining tension. Ask someone else and you may get a different opinion. Since I don't break strings, I can keep gut for quite some time and many people can't do that. That probably gives me a different perspective.
     
  18. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    ditto.

    I would say the vast majority of people using poly aren't getting any benefits out of it. There swing speed is just nowehere near where it needs to be to get the benefits out of the string.

    To add, most people lose power, control, and spin using poly. Yes, I said it, SPIN. Since they can't produce the swing speeds necessary to "activate" the poly, they end up playing with simply a dead string that has nowhere near the power, control, spin, comfort and playing life provided by a multi or natural gut.

    In the end, they are riding a bicycle with flat tires 3 days after they strung up their racquet with it.

    The only benefit they are really getting is the poly lasts longer at the cost of dying much quicker.
     
  19. rufusbgood

    rufusbgood Semi-Pro

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    Seems an overstatement to me Drak.

    Poly solves a real problem for players who complain about string movement. This is especially a problem for folks who choose to use oversize racquets. Poly solves a number of issues with an oversize. It tames the power, it doesn't break as quickly, it eliminates string movement and it does all this while allowing you to reduce tension. So you get all these benefits along with a larger sweetspot and a more forgiving string bed.

    I have plenty of customers who don't hit hard using polys. I don't think it goes dead for them as fast as it does for you precisely because they don't hit hard. They never really test the elastic limit of the string. And even if they don't "activate" the poly, even if they hit flat, they get a more controlled hit because the string lacks trampoline.
     
  20. fortun8son

    fortun8son Hall of Fame

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    I have tried out RIP Control for several people that I thought would not benefit from poly
    They preferred the feel, play amd minimal string movement of SPPP/Syngut, which is fine for me, I get to string them more often! :)
    Of course this does not answer the OP's question.
    I got shot down for saying that the popularity is due to Federer's use of Gut/Poly.
    Obviously it does work for many players, but how many would've even tried it if not for Fed and would Wilson be marketing Champion's Choice?
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2012
  21. 2Hare

    2Hare Semi-Pro

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    The experiments on TW University certain made a convincing case for gut/poly, more so than Federer if you ask me. If it has highest spin potential, good power, and good touch, why wouldn't anyone try it? Djokovic certainly seemed convinced and switched a while ago before his 2011 run.
     
  22. fortun8son

    fortun8son Hall of Fame

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    I know I'm fighting a losing battle here. I'm just trying to put this into historical perspective.
    When did Federer start using gut/poly?
    When did the TWU study come out?
    When was Champion's Choice introduced?

    It's the same with Babolat racquets.
    They are certainly fine products, but would they be enjoying such enormous popularity were it not for Nadal and Roddick and other sponsored pros?

    Dare I mention Nike Golf and Tiger?

    "Ooh! That looks pretty cool. I should try that. Whaddaya know ? It works! I'm gonna tell others."
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2012
  23. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    I thought the idea of a gut/poly hybrid was ridiculous when I first heard of it. I was away from the game for 8 years, just came back to it last August. When I was last playing in 2003, if these hybrids were popular then I don't remember it. When I heard about it I thought it sounded silly. Finally I was convinced to try it and I've done extensive demoing. I've compared different gut/poly hybrids to each other, to a full multi setup and to a full gut setup. Here has been my general take, bear in mind I'm probably playing at a weak 4.5 level right now.

    - full gut: too powerful, even when strung tightly. Just sprayed too many balls 1-2' past the baseline. Love the feel, just wish it had more control.

    - full multi: the ones I've tried so far, they don't have that crisp gut feel that a gut/poly hybrid gives me, they feel mushy (others call it "plush"), and they have neither the power of the gut or the spin/control of the poly.

    - the hybrids: they give me the best of both worlds. I get the fundamental feel of gut and the power of gut, but it's harnessed and more controlable. I get more spin and control with the hybrids, no question about it.

    And I'm not a hard hitter. I have an all court game and I'm not going to sit at the baseline and blow groundstrokes by anyone on a consistent basis. I can hit the ball reasonably hard for my level but I'm going to move you around, get you out of position, and then I'll blow one by, or approach when I anticipate a weak reply and then put away the volley. I'm not a power player, and there is no question in my mind I benefit from poly in the crosses.
     
  24. TimothyO

    TimothyO Hall of Fame

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    No, you got "shot down" for asserting that people switched to gut/poly because of Fed without providing any evidence.

    Doing some quick searches on TT you'll find loads of threads on low friction hybrids in general and gut/poly hybrids' relationship to low friction.

    You won't find many discussions on Federer's strings and virtually none on the specifics of their capabilities (you will many threads on his frame).

    In fact, the few threads that mention Fed's setup usually do so retrospectively. Those mentions are typically in threads that start about gut/poly low friction hybrids in general and which later cite Federer and Djokovic as users (there are others...I provided a list in one thread somewhere aroind here).

    Undoubtedly some folks tried Fed's strings just as many, many players want to buy "his" frame. But the talk around here has been far, far more about TW research and the experiements by many TT members like me.

    You're just not going to find a ton of threads along the lines of, "OMG, Feds Strings are Amazing!" and with good reason. Based on my experiments which included his setup Luxilon is NOT the best choice for a low friction hybrid. Lux dents easily and therefore locks up the stringbed more easily. It's also not as slippery as other polys such as more recent co-polys. Fed and Joker probably use it more out of habit than anything else.
     
  25. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

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    I agree about the Lux. The CoFocus is far better and and I have 2 gut poly sticks. One with Cofocus and one with ALU Power. The CoFocus gets more spin and the feel is incredible as well.
     
  26. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    I typically tell them to take up ping pong if they don't like their strings moving.

    Poly does in fact move in oversize frames. Granted, not as much as other strings. Also, if it is not moving, then this means they have a flat swing, and therefore are not getting the supposed benefit that poly would have provided them.

    There are plenty of strings (non-poly) that are low powered.

    True, but neither does Kevlar.

    Larger sweet spot from a poly? Wow. Uhmmm, ok.

    True.
     
  27. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

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    Drak...you have any suggestions for us Floridians possibly using gut in the summer? I currently use string savers when i see fraying, but any other tips would be great.
     
  28. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    best bet has always been to wipe it clean after playing, and then lightly rub a candle over it.

    also, as you are already doing, the string savers are the way to go to add durability.

    I really wish gut lasted me longer. Best all-around string.
     
  29. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

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    Interesting..I do use a gut/poly hybrid because full gut does not last long enough for me and is expensive. I also have been playing since I was a kid and can utilize the poly's spin.

    So I would rub a candle on the mains after wiping down the gut with any cloth laying around basically?

    And I agree on gut..once I found the right tension for me, it breaks in after a little bit of hitting and plays absolutely godly. Best string ever.
     
  30. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    This one hurt my stomach! I've never found a string or hybrid that does not move. All strings move for me, some more so than others.
     
  31. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Make sure to keep the gut out of the heat except when you are on court.
     
  32. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

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    Ok cool..I definitely always keep my sticks in my bag in a temperature controlled environment (my closet).

    Mikeler, the gut/poly thing is right up your alley..you may brush the ball more than me though so it may cost too much for you, but it destroys all hybrids.
     
  33. corners

    corners Legend

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    One thing: TW University has not yet published spin tests of gut/poly. They have tested the spin rates of various full poly setups, gut and various nylon strings, but have not directly tested any hybrids for spin. They have published string on string friction coefficients, and gut/poly is the slipperiest combination (but not poly/gut!) but this does not necessarily mean that it's the best for spin. Given the evidence provided by their various experiments on friction, string pattern and material, low interstring friction should produce more spin in the gut/poly setup. The theoretical case is there to support the anecdotes supplied by players (on this forum and elsewhere) that gut/poly is the bomb, but they have provided no direct evidence that that is the case, so far.
     
  34. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    I tried a gut/poly hybrid out with Unifibre mains last month. The B5E sawed right through it after only 3 sets. The Wilson gut full job went over 10 hours so that is not enough life for me to justify the expense.
     
  35. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

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    Yeah b5e would not be a good cross imo. I am using MSV Cofocus..its fantastic. Very slick string. I will see how long it lasts. I am at 3.5 hours with minimal fraying and notching.
     
  36. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

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    You are correct there.

    I am personally going by what I experience on the court and hear from my opponent, which is subjective. I can say the spin level from my viewpoint has given me a much more consistent and very heavy ball, rather similar to Tour Bite. Opponent last night said the spin was eating him up, but what does that mean scientifically? Nothing.
     
  37. TimothyO

    TimothyO Hall of Fame

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    This is very true!

    At this point one is left to piece together solutions from bits of TW research and then experiment with it.

    I wish TWU was more systematic in its research approach.

    For example, TW has published data on on various aspects of stringbed friction but keeps changing the reference strings. I wish they would have taken certain homogeneous and hybrid stringbeds through all of the paces on a consistent basis. At the moment you can see one type of friction data on a given setup but it might not appear in another data set. A chaotic approach to say the least.

    This is a shame since the topic is truly complex. Based on my limited experiments it appears that friction is important but it's not the only factor. Relative main and cross tension is crucial. So are texture (textured crosses lock the SB), cross stiffness (not just tension), cross smoothness and dent-ability (un-dent-able crosses are best), and absolute SB tension.

    String density is important but maybe not as important as conventional wisdom would suggest. I've achieved monster spin with a PSLGT strung with a gut/poly hybrid...it's a dense 95"/18x20. But I've also struggled with more open yet stiffer frames too using the same hybrid.

    Even lead placement has a huge impact. I can tweak the lead on my 300 and either get pedestrian spin demanding perfect technique or idiot proof spin potential which causes slices to bounce at fit-inducing angles (people get mad at me now since they often whiff tackling these shots!)

    And you'd laugh if I revealed the latest experiment...the result came from a "oh, what the heck, try it" moment and it produced spectacular results using very little lead.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2012
  38. 2Hare

    2Hare Semi-Pro

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    I think Federer probably start using the hybrid before the study to be fair, I'm not 100% sure though. I thought Babolat got so popular because they were pushing it to juniors and college players before. But Babolat sticks have this awesome stiffness to it, giving them awesome spins and power that's perfectly suited for today's poly baseline game.
     
  39. rufusbgood

    rufusbgood Semi-Pro

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    Here in NY I think most of us would prefer to see the number of tennis players increase. Down in FL I guess you'd prefer to see more open courts.

    I hit pretty well and use an oversize. Someone here was touting Mantis Comfort Synth as a great string so I tried it, strung 6 lbs tighter than I would have done a poly. The strings were moving all over the place and broke in less than 2 hrs. WC Silverstring will last me 6 sessions and until the strings are about ready to break, string movement is negligible.

    As to the question of "supposed benefits", once again I would say that if the player's goal was to get a string job that does not require constant string straightening, then they got their benefit. If their goal was to get a string job that keeps the ball in the court, then if we've met that criteria they got their benefit. If their goal was to avoid getting a restringing every other week then they got their benefit.

    Yes, well if you break up my posts into tiny little pieces the fact that poly strings manage to combine several advantages kind of gets lost in the sauce.

    See previous response.

    The thing is Drak if you follow the instructions on the package about stringing 10-20% lower, yes you do get a larger sweet spot.
     
  40. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    OK, I hit with my new hybrid set-up. I also hit with my gut.

    The hybrid is a prepackaged VS 16 (55) with Blast 17 (50) , gut on the mains.

    I do like the hybrid better. My ball had better shape. Still, the gut does have a very nice feel to it. The hybrid feels almost pingy in comparison. The strings on the hybrid are so loose that I can move them with my fingers.

    Honestly, I might switch to 17 gauge Blast next time I string. I doubt I would have an issue with trampolining. The hybrid feels a little hard, so maybe using 17 instead of 16 would help with that?

    Anyway, I like the ball I'm producing with the hybrid, and so far my elbow feels fine. Wish me luck in the tournament!!
     
  41. TimothyO

    TimothyO Hall of Fame

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    Cindy,

    That string movement is perfect! The mains should slide smoothly across the crosses and move back om their own. Moving the crosses should require you to move them back into place and they should make a clicking noise.

    What frame are you using?
     
  42. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    I'm using a 2006 Aeropro. Any thoughts on whether 17 gauge would be better for the Blast crosses? If it helps, I'm a 50-year-old 4.0 woman who needs all the spin she can get.

    Thanks for all the help, everyone. Strings are complicated. I think I would have botched it without you.
     
  43. COPEY

    COPEY Hall of Fame

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    Completely untrue. The racquet construction is the only thing that determines the size of the "coefficient of percussion" a.k.a. sweetspot (1 of 3). Manipulating string tensions can only give you the illusion of a larger sweetspot.

    Basically what you don't want if you're prone to elbow/wrist/shoulder issues is a light racquet and/or a light racquet that's head-heavy.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2012
  44. rufusbgood

    rufusbgood Semi-Pro

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    From the USRSA Stringer's Digest Glossary:

    "Sweetspot. In simplest terminology, that part of the string face that, when struck, returns the ball with the greatest possible power and accuracy. This return is most often qualified as "an on-center hit." Other results are a crisp "ping" sound and minimal shock to the hand or arm. Sweetspot size can be determined by the size of the frame, the type, tension and gauge of the string and several other variables. "

    Also from the USRSA Stringer's Digest:

    "You may want to string a beginner's frame at the loose end of the recommended tension range. You'll give him a more forgiving string face on off-center hits."

    Now, what about lowering the tension might cause the string face to be more forgiving? An expanded hitting zone? Might that be the same thing as a larger sweetspot?
     
  45. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    ^^^ I sincerely doubt that is accurate. Think about it,,,,, by that logic, if you lower tension enough, then this would mean one could make the entire string bed a sweet spot.

    also, what if someone typically string a 95 sq in frame (16X19), at 70 lbs? Lowering the tension by 10% would still give that player a 63lb tension, and by 20% a 56 lb tension which are both considered high.

    The reason for string companies to recommend lowering the tenision is because poly is so stiff, they want to assist the player in achieving the same "string bed stiffness" they experienced with the synthetic they were using prior.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2012
  46. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    OK, I need to stop thinking about my strings.

    Tonight, any time my ball didn't have as much spin as I wanted, I cursed the strings. This has got to stop. I hit *plenty* of balls with great spin.

    My elbow feels great. Thanks to all of you for helping me fix things. Now if you'll excuse me, I'm going to wipe my mind clean of All Things String and focus on my footwork. 'Cause that is clearly the problem!
     
  47. 2Hare

    2Hare Semi-Pro

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    try to imagine a tight and loose trampoline in your mind with you jumping on it. when you are in the center of either trampoline, you'll be bouncing without a problem. But when you jump off center, a tight trampoline would be jarring to your legs and stop you from bouncing. whereas jumping off center of a loose trampoline would still bounce you but in an angle pointing toward the center of the trampoline. Hope this helps!
     
  48. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    ^^unfortunately for your theory, a trampoline, unlike a racquet has springs on the outer edges that both cushion and propel/spring the outside of the trampoline. In addition, even the outer edges of a trampoline does not have the same spring as the center. Additionally, the outer edge of a string bed is stiff as a board, which is why strings snap when you hit a ball there (shank/mishit). This is more prominent with poly strings.
     
  49. fortun8son

    fortun8son Hall of Fame

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    You're right Cindy. Stop thinking about the strings.
    Elbow feels good. Just play.
     
  50. 2Hare

    2Hare Semi-Pro

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    You really don't have much of imagination do you? A child would know the difference between an example and the real thing. It's like complaining that a porsche is not a car because it only has two doors haha. You think whatever you like to think.
     

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