Why do people say that a player is "too short" to win slams?

Discussion in 'General Pro Player Discussion' started by dangalak, Oct 7, 2012.

  1. rofl_copter3

    rofl_copter3 Professional

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    He stands on top of the baseline and takes every ball extremely early. This style of play requires a lot of practice to maintain the timing and superb hand eye coordination...

    He has had Nadal's number so many times but against Fed he will be up a set and a break and fall to pieces which has become his mo in big matches ie what holds him back was not skill or height but purely mental...
     
    #51
  2. TheFifthSet

    TheFifthSet Hall of Fame

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    Best post in this thread. That's not to say there aren't shorter players with hard groundstrokes (like Davy, Agassi), but it's no doubt a factor. I don't think it's as huge of one as some people make it out to be though.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2012
    #52
  3. dangalak

    dangalak Banned

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    Didn't know that this is called "brazen" here.

    Why would I mention what I agree with? If I didn't agree with it, I probably would let you know. :)
     
    #53
  4. TheFifthSet

    TheFifthSet Hall of Fame

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    Seems nitpicky and a waste of time. But, just one persons opinion.
     
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  5. Wuppy

    Wuppy Professional

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    Highly unlikely. He'd still be crap.

    Look at NBA basketball players. They're his height and have incredible movement abilities. They're amazing athletes, and I'm not even a basketball fan. Isner is not an amazing athlete.
     
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  6. dangalak

    dangalak Banned

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    They play basketball, not tennis. They would look slow and lumbering too on a tennis court.
     
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  7. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Well, he does know basketball.
    JohnLucus, one of the quickest point guards in the NBA back when, was always working with HenryHines to refine his movement for pro tennis. John could change direction like Isiah or Kevin the Mayor of Sacramento, but was clumsy moving when he began his second tennis career. He'd gotten used to running and moving for basketball, where the court is much bigger, and pure speed is a necessity.
    Not so in tennis. You only cover your half of the court, and not nearly the whole half.
    He worked on moving 3', 5', 7', and 9', and back, in HITTING POSITION. He watched JimmyConnors run around bent over with 2 hands on the racket, and he worked hard and endlessly.
    I think he ended up top 75 in Men's pro, but was always working on his movement.
     
    #57
  8. jerriy

    jerriy Hall of Fame

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    Height is less relevant at local scrub/amateur level.
     
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  9. winstonplum

    winstonplum Hall of Fame

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    Look, dudes, the four best players in the world are all literally identical heights, with Murray being maybe a 1/2 tall than the rest. It's laughable, this mumbo jumbo about Nadal being 6'0". I've stood next to Nadal, a foot away, multiple times at IW and he's just as tall as I am and I'm 6' 1" 1/2 on the dot. It's quite weird to actually see Federer, Nadal, and Djokovic in person, close up. They don't come off as particularly tall on the television screen, but seeing them close up, I'm like, Damn, they're kind of tall just like me (not that I'm a giant or anything, but given that the average American male is 5' 9", we're all definitely on the tall side. I'd say Murray is 6' 2"--6' 2"1/4.

    The discussion of heights can end right there. At the elite level of the game, there's something about being about that height that maximizes ball-striking effectiveness. In a game of millimeters, striking a short ball (inside the baseline) with you forehand four inches higher than a player that is 5' 8"-5' 9" is going to add up to a huge difference. And serving, well, that just self-explanatory why height would help.
     
    #59

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