Why/How in the WORLD do people use a Pure Drive?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by TennisCanada1, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. TennisCanada1

    TennisCanada1 Semi-Pro

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    I use a PST, im a 5.5 player, and I just don't understand why any high level player would use a pure drive, let alone roddick, benneteau, marc lopez, etc.

    Its a trampoline; under pressure theres no stability and the ball goes absolutely flying. It's like a toy compared to other racquets. I'd like to think that people that are at a high enough level can generate their own power, and that control is something needed in a racquet. Not to say the PST is the way to go, im just saying that literally every racquet 100sq or lower (so midplus and lower) don't even come close to this frame in terms of how ridiculously powerful, lack of control and toy like it is.
     
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  2. TennisCanada1

    TennisCanada1 Semi-Pro

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    and i understand there will be some people here who will reply : its whatever the player is comfortable with.

    im not looking for an answer like that. i think its absolutely a valid point but what im looking for is to understand how players could actually yield a racquet like that and not be prone to a lot of UE
     
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  3. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    well....roddicks is super leaded up i believe
     
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  4. TennisCanada1

    TennisCanada1 Semi-Pro

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    yea i know that, i just dont get why its so popular also
     
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  5. chizzle

    chizzle Rookie

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    You might get "blowed" up for the question. But....I'm with you. Under pressure I need to be able to "swing out". Felt I could not control it at all.

    Guessing it has a lot to do with playing style (all court vs baseliner looking for the FH to end the point, etc).
     
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  6. sundaypunch

    sundaypunch Hall of Fame

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    Many players are able to control the power. I don't see a Pure Drive as a good choice for a flat hitter. It is a great racquet for someone that hits with a lot of spin.
     
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  7. Venetian

    Venetian Professional

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    I've hit with various incarnations since it's original release and never thought that it felt different from any other similarly spec'd racquet.
     
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  8. ellipticality_224

    ellipticality_224 Banned

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    I dont like the pure drive because its too... well, I cant explain it, Im a 4.0 and I cant stand it, it just feels to 'new' to me, but if I hit with the Extreme (virtually the same racket) I love it, I use the presitge however, Its all what you grow up on. Roddick used the Pure Drive when he was a visor wearing pretty boy, and before that it was the POG. I think it may have something to do with the over modernized technologies, like the cortex, woofer, and GT. I dont think any of the Babolat players play with cortex or GT, but some use woofer I know.
     
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  9. ellipticality_224

    ellipticality_224 Banned

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    Have you seen some of these oversized frames they make now? they arent even closed to your comparison with a 'toy'. I can understand older senior players using those frames, but I see beginners and decent players using these what I like to call "cheater frames" I personally think anything over 107 should be made illegal, and anything over 27.5 illegal, they say they want to ban polys, I say ban these OS frames, Trust me, the pure drive is not all that powerful.
     
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  10. TennisCanada1

    TennisCanada1 Semi-Pro

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    this is completely irrelevant to what im talking about. highly competitive players and pros dont use oversized racquets. maybe 1 or 2 pros but im talking about the fact that the pure drive is still a "tweener" frame and its so popular but plays so much like an OS rather than something of a mp or lower.
     
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  11. ellipticality_224

    ellipticality_224 Banned

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    You say its toy like? Not even close, Im saying compared to these cheater frames, they do not even compare. the Pure Drive caters to a certain type of player, and you obviously arent that person??? I know lots of local shop pros that use the older pure drives (teams) and are all 4.5 to 5.5s and love it. They cant play with anything but a stiff thick beam pop frame. Some people cant generate a lot of power, but still have the shots, and can move REALLY well, and some have the power, and dont need all that extram umph to make shots, thus we have prestiges and other frames.
     
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  12. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    I felt the same way about the Donnay Formula 100. It would probably do me some good while I'm looking to regain my old tennis form, but I could easily see myself having trouble controlling the Formula 100 as my technique improves and swing speed increases over time.

    I think power is almost next to useless if it becomes difficult to harness.

     
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  13. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    the pure drive is also very hollow feeling
     
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  14. TheVuMan

    TheVuMan New User

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    I actually just switched to the pure drive roddick from a prestige. I actually started out just trying it for fun, and when i did I noticed that it was a whole lot more powerful than a prestige type racquet. I didn't like it at first but I gave it some time. After about a week or so I started to get use to the power that the racquet was giving me.

    I do agree though that under pressure it is hard to control, but the racquet really does reward you when you are confident in your strokes. As for the hollow feeling, I also agree with this as it was one of the first things i noticed. Again, its just a thing you get used to. I plan to keep with the PDR for a while unless something else pops up that intrigues me.
     
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  15. Hi I'm Ray

    Hi I'm Ray Hall of Fame

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    It just fits a style of play. I used to play a 90, now an APDGT for the past 2.5yrs. Yesterday I barrowed a 115in monster for fun and was surprised I could hit fast and have 10-15 shot rallies after a few minutes of adjustment. But I had to adjust my swing and hit flatter shots.

    I'm sure your 5.5 peers who hit with a PD or similar frames don't problems controlling it or hitting under pressure.

    Toy-like? Its about the weight. I'm pretty sure a lot of people are comparing heavier sticks, some customized, to stock tweeners, which honestly is a pretty lame comparison. I could lead up a tweener to a high weight and swingweight then say a 12.2oz, 325 sw frame feels like a flimsy toy in comparison.
    I have classic players frames that I still hit with. The tweeners I use have leather and leaded to about 340sw - more hollow feeling because of the thick beam and less feel/feedback, but certainly has mass and stability, and not toy-like.
     
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  16. WhereIsMacMac

    WhereIsMacMac Professional

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    Just grip it and you're good to go
     
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  17. KenC

    KenC Professional

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    It's not a bad racquet for beginners up to the 4.0 level. Once someone acquires good technique and control it's better to move onto something more solid. I always have said the ProKennex 5i 315 is everything the PD should be. More solid, a little less power and a lot more control, but most importantly it won't wreck your arm.
     
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  18. Dgdavid

    Dgdavid Professional

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    this thread is gonna be a cracker. got a nice cup of tea and going to watch the fireworks :)

    I think tenniscanada should start a thread "All Prestiges are poofs" and then I might have to get beer.
     
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  19. Broly4

    Broly4 Rookie

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    ++++++++1!
     
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  20. austennis81

    austennis81 New User

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    i tried one a few weeks ago and had exactly the same thoughts!! i tried one again today and spent a while getting used to it - and now love it! in fact - i bought one. i was actually talking myself to not buy one before trying it again......
    It could be the strings in the one you tried - the first one i tried felt like a trampoline. this one much better.
    i played previously with much heavier racquets - cant believe how much easier it is to play with something like this.
     
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  21. galain

    galain Hall of Fame

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    The Pure Drive is a powerful stick. If you're good enough to control your shots and can make the racquet do what you want, you have a frame that will add a few mph to your game.

    Pro's have the talent to do this - that's why there are so many Pure Drives on the pro tour.
     
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  22. Sundan

    Sundan Rookie

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    I have a few or actually more than a few at my club using Pure drives,and aeros too btw. They seem happy with them and they play good too,even some of the coaches use them.

    Someone i play with alot refused to test my new Blade 93,since "- i will never change racquet anyway".

    Pretty meaningless post but just saying there are alot of people that are happy with them.
     
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  23. tom4ny

    tom4ny Semi-Pro

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    it's all about spin - spin is your friend and this is how the modern baseline bashing game started. poly brought it to another level yet.
     
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  24. Anton

    Anton Hall of Fame

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    With full western stroke and high tension it plays fine and new ones have decent feel too.

    Trying a racket with random string setup and weight is meaningless.

    Kim Clijsters strung her PD at 66lbs natural gut.
    Li-na at 63lbs multi.
    Roddick at 63lbs nat gut m/ poly cr.

    And these people hit with a racket for an hour and got it re-strung, unlike regular players who's tension drops way down before they restring.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2013
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  25. gplracer

    gplracer Professional

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    Pure drive is the only racket in my life that ever made my elbow hurt. And it hurt really bad....
     
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  26. marosmith

    marosmith Professional

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    Well I agree to me it's a toy but with:

    1. Lead
    2. High string tension and thicker gauges
    3. Some form of poly or poly hybrid string
    4. Extreme grip on forehand

    It can clearly be a racket used by professionals. Of course you need either an arm forged of titanium or perfect strokes never hitting off center to avoid injuries.
     
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  27. RadicalMPfan

    RadicalMPfan Rookie

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    Completely agree with you.

    Only racquet I've ever had elbow problems with. Also, could not get used to the cheap hollow feeling. It is not a weight issue, as i've played with lighter racquets that were more solid.

    The racquet literally feels like a K-mart special.
     
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  28. NetNinja68

    NetNinja68 Rookie

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    I hit with The PDGT for a while some years back but once my technique improved, I started hitting with heavier thinner-beamed sticks and have not looked back. I bought mine for the same reason most everyone does and that's because they are just so damn popular!! As a fluke I hit with a buddy's Pro Open and was hooked on it's feel but eventually put it down as well. As stated earlier, I've moved away from the tweeners and have preferred players frames for about the last 4 years.
     
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  29. julian

    julian Hall of Fame

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    Who says to ban polys?

    Who says to ban polys?
     
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  30. OTMPut

    OTMPut Hall of Fame

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    I have found PDR useful when i am under pressure and bossed around the court by a better player; when you don't have time to take a full swing and PDR can still produce a deep bal with just a flick of wrist.

    I am about 4 or 4.5. I always lose 1 & 0 or 1 & 1 to a 5+ player at the local club when I play with redondo (my usual frame). I find PDR uncomfortable to my arm & shoulder, however when i use PDR, i a lose 3 & 3. Key difference is i can get some cheap points off serve and stay longer in rallies without producing a short put-away ball.
     
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  31. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    I've played with mids, MPs and the PDR. It took me a little while to get used to the PDR - you need faster swingspeed and lots of topspin - but I could play quite well with it. It just did a number on my arm.

    I think that it's pretty amazing what the human body can adapt to.
     
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  32. AlfaAce

    AlfaAce Rookie

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    This is almost a "troll post" but I'll bite. The PD2012 stands on it's own merit as for who uses it and how successful they are with it. Try it with a full bed of natural gut at 60-62# before you diss it... all the control you could ever want if you are genuinely a "player". If you're under a 4.0-4.5, sorry, you aren't qualified to rate or discuss this frame.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2013
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  33. TennisCanada1

    TennisCanada1 Semi-Pro

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    Obviously it isnt a troll post. look at the discussion that has brewed as a result. It's a legitimate question, because its such an unappealing frame to many for its recreational-like style.. a lot of the posts here talk about having to manipulate it heavily with lead, etc to make it ideal for professional use.
     
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  34. AlfaAce

    AlfaAce Rookie

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    Actually, if you compare the PD2012 specs to the new APD specs, they are almost identical without modification!!!

    Here you go:http://www.racquetfinder.com/compare.php?pcode=APD13;BPD11&x=38&y=20
     
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  35. TennisCanada1

    TennisCanada1 Semi-Pro

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    Ok that wasn't my point..
    I don't really care if they are similar.
     
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  36. AlfaAce

    AlfaAce Rookie

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    Yeah, I get that... but the point is that the PD2012 and the new APD are "extremely successful Babolat players racquets that are quite similar in specs".

    Equally as many posts here talk about what a phenomenal racquet the PD2012 actually is for not only the recreational player but also for pros (with or without lead tape :rolleyes:): http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=420358&highlight=PD2012

    I wish people would stop focusing on the racquet and start focusing on their game (or lack there of).
     
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  37. darklore009

    darklore009 Professional

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    during my high school year, my coach ALMOST made everyone switch to the pure drive (except for me). I used the k90 through out my high school year. He tried to convince me to switch and he made an assumption that the pure drive is the "#1 racket in the world". I replied to him that that would be impossible to say. If it's the #1 racket in the world. Everyone would be using it.
     
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  38. Bartelby

    Bartelby G.O.A.T.

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    Everyone makes this style of racquet and because it's powerful it punishes bad technique with over-hitting, as opposed to short balling with a heavy low powered racquet.
     
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  39. ellipticality_224

    ellipticality_224 Banned

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    Do you ever wonder why the k90 is ALWAYS a best seller on TW??? Its because Fed Man uses it. There would be much less k90 users if fed had gone with something different. Do you ever wonder why the Pure Drive is ALWAYS a best seller on TW? Its because its a racket that is good for just about all sub touring levels of play. Except those macho guys who belong on the football field rather than a tennis court (like me) who can swing around something hefty like a prestige all day and not get fatigued. I use the prestige because it absorbs power from my aggressive swing and is rather dead feeling. Can I use the Pure Drive? Of course! I love the frame, but I have a hard time holding back when using it and not swinging out because I lack racket head speed to create those massive amounts of spin like pros that DO use tweeners. The Babolat Drive series is probably the number on racket in the world right now, because everyone can use it to an extent, it does not cater to a specific player. Am I saying that I am a pro because of my hard fast swings? No, Im actually a 4.0 mid range. I have a very hard punching swing that is hard to keep in the lines and I need something heavy to slow my swing down and absorb some power. And there are 5.5 and 6.0 players who do not hit NEAR as hard as I do, they are just some kinda godly consistent who hit with good control and spin and need that extra pop in their racket to help them out. Not everyone who is good hits hard, and these players use the pure drive to give them that extra power.

    I.E. My coach that taught me how to play is a 5.0 now, he played on the junior circuit until he was 16 and burned out. He was aparently pretty good, and beat John Isner when he was 13 and he was 14 in a tournament in Greensboro (note that Isner did not take off until his later years in college, he was just your average touring junior then). He is skinny as a rail, 6'3" and 160 or so pounds, with no muscle at all, yet he can rip spin and place the ball anywhere, and rally all day and never get tired. His serve averages 100 mph, and probably has never hit a forehand winner more than twice in a match. And guess what racket he uses? THE PURE DRIVE PLUS! He says it gives him that extra pop that he simply cant do with a players racket. He tried hitting with my prestige a few years back and hated it, he said he couldnt get enough power on anything and the weight was simply unbearable for him.

    There is no #1 racket in the world in terms of playability, there are only best selling frames.
     
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  40. Timbo's hopeless slice

    Timbo's hopeless slice Hall of Fame

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    a lot of bad players like to use things like Prestiges as they are not punished for poor technique.

    very hard to spray a 1HBH long with one of those things.

    a lot of very good players use the Pure drive because it combines stability with power. One does need to be able to control one's shots with spin, however..

    lots of very good and very bad players use all kinds of frames because they like different things...

    I tend to miss FHs with a PD because I tend hit a bit flat sometimes when I am going for a winner.
     
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  41. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    People who prefer not to have their arms in a sling when they get older.
     
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  42. darklore009

    darklore009 Professional

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    Before i got my hands on the k90, i used the 6.0 85. i felt that i need to get a bigger head size. thats why i switch to it. Also, when i use the pure drive, it's stiff and hurts my arm. and i have a preference in sampler head size
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2013
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  43. cork_screw

    cork_screw Hall of Fame

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    This racquet is tricky because there's a lot of power going into it. I found it really difficult to return serve with it. I faced a few guys who hit above 100 mph and the ball really flies on you, sometimes launching out if you are not careful. Also, keep in mind this racquet is also used by pros like Roddick and Devermann, Benneteau and others so there is a way to control it, but i use it like how I use my pro staffs and that is a lot of chipping and blocking and that just won't do. I think something like serve returns you really need to finish with a little bit of rolling the ball up or finishing over the ball a little to get some spin to bring it back down on the court.

    I noticed if you block back a 115 mph serve it will fly long for sure. There's tons of other examples, but you really need to examine the way you're using this racquet and make some adjustments. I know someone who's really good on our ladder (who is also an ahole), but he does really well and he uses the pure drive. But if it suites you, just use it and experiment workarounds and see if you can make it come to life for you. If not, switch to something that will make you win matches.

    Key thing whether it's a mid size or a tweener have no shame in what you use as long as you are getting the results. If a pink tweener was the result of tournament wins day in and day out, I would use that over any glorified prestige mp any day.
     
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  44. cork_screw

    cork_screw Hall of Fame

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    What people really don't understand is that if you really want to develop your strokes, you should really start off by trying to see if you can generate the same amount of power from a more compact simple stroke that's slower. If you can do that, you will have no problem hitting a regular stroke or a sped up stroke.

    I can hit a simplified stroke with no backswing with just the follow through and balls past guys who are hitting with a full stroke. This is the yoda in the technique that people should be testing themselves in order to become more proficient in their learning graph.
     
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  45. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    I think that players should try out various racquets to see what they are like and what other players have to do to play the way they do with the wide variety of equipment out there. I've been all over the map on types of racquets and have found the range that I like but it's been a nice journey (mostly) to get a feel for what others use.
     
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  46. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    I think it all boils down to do you like a thin beam with a bit more flex, or do you like a thicker beam that is stiffer. I have tried several thicker beams but not the PD. I don't like thicker stiffer rackets and always return to thiner flexier rackets.

    I agree with the OP of the thread that tweener types are more difficult to control and have far less feel. The extra power of a tweener is handly when spanking a sitter but this is not enough to make me switch. Volleys, returns, playing against pace, defensives gets, and overheads are all easier for me with a thiner flexier more controllable less explosive racket. Also, I can use lower tensions with a thinner beam and still control the ball.
     
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  47. naturallight

    naturallight Rookie

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    Well to me, more weight = more power, so I don’t find a 11oz racquet too powerful by any stretch. One of the reasons I like the Babs is because I feel it's easier to take big cuts and still have the ball go in.

    You mention a trampoline effect--wouldn't this have more to do with the strings than the racquet? Maybe the racquet you hit with had some low tension syn or gut?
     
    #47
  48. dman72

    dman72 Hall of Fame

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    I went through a stage where I was using an 03 shark mp because it offered many of the benefits of a pure drive with a bit more comfort.

    I found that when I was under control, swinging around 80%, i could execute some great shots.

    The problem is, I always had to rachet back..if I ever really went after a service return, it would almost ALWAYS go out. So, I started modifying my grip more towards western and doing a more exaggerated windsheild wiper motion to get more spin, and that was the only way I could keep the ball in the court. I ended up with some tennis elbow.

    After a few months, I went back to my NXG OS..which is still quite powerful but not as much as the Shark.

    Recently after doing some stepped up weightlifting, I'm finding more shots going long with the OS, so I transitioned to the NXG midplus yesterday (I've had all of these frames for awhile), and after losing the first set against a guy I play regultarly 6-1 trying to get my stroke groved, I won the second set 6-1 and was winning the 3rd 5-4 when we ran out of time. I was able to swing out at 100% and still keep the ball in as long as I completed my stroke.

    It's always a trade off....go with the more powerful frame and keep having to rachet back to keep in control or hit too many long..or go with the softer frame and maybe hit a few balls too short.
     
    #48
  49. Top Jimmy

    Top Jimmy Semi-Pro

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    These post are always ridiculous to me.

    I've seen many 5.0+ players use the PureD and AeroD and crush the ball and somehow the balls seem to go in.

    According to most on here, they should never go in, but they do, odd. Plus their elbows don't explode or come flying off either.
     
    #49
  50. El Zed

    El Zed Banned

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    I never really understood the consideration of Babolats in the sub-12 oz. range, in the context of use by professional players. Does Nadal use a stock APD? Yes, but with lead. Does Roddick use a PDR+? Yes, but again with lead. Tsonga? Yes, again with lead and silicone.

    To the extent that a racquet like the APD or PDR can be tested and so highly evaluated at its stock specs (by TW for instance) is truly a testament to the quality of the product. Can you use these racquets at stock specs? Of course, but their playability is - to me, and for my requirements - exponentially superior once leaded and siliconed. This is no different than Head's pro stock frames - I don't recall reading a single post by anyone using a PT57, TGK, or TGT frame without lead and/or silicone. Can you? Of course, but their playability would be significantly compromised. This while affording you the opportunity to purchase frames capable of modification readily from reputable retailers at a reasonable cost --- instead of the circus show (and characters) incumbent to Head pro stocks...
     
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