Why Laver didnt win a slam after 1969?

Discussion in 'Former Pro Player Talk' started by bonga77, Feb 6, 2010.

  1. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne Banned

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    I must contradict: The Little Nut earned rather little. He claimed that he got only 300 "Reichsmark" (D-Mark) for his first world championship title in Berlin.

    He also said that "money spoils character"- even though he did not even know Mitt Romney...
     
  2. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    Good quote on Romney¡¡¡

    Considering the inflation of the 30´s in Germany, no wonder Nusslein was complaining about his 300 DM
     
  3. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne Banned

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    I think that was after the time of high inflation...
     
  4. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    The year of the German hyperinflation was 1923.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2012
  5. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    The incredible fact about post 69 Laver is not that he didn´t win a major or get to play a final...the man that had won everything on sight in 69 DID NOT EVEN REACH A SINGLE SEMIFINAL from 1970 till 1977, when he retired.I mean, based on that, a guy like Davidenkho or Verdasco could claim to be better than laver for a while.

    So, there must be another serious reason, other than injuries.IMO it is the pursue of money plus the fact that he felt, as he wrotte, so much released after taking his second GS that he literally didn´t care ( which is hard to believe from such a hungry competitor as the rocket)
     
  6. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    He just played badly in the majors that he played in the 1970s, as simple as that. In the 1960s, Laver had many close matches in the majors, but would nearly always find a way to win them. In the 1970s, the opposite would be true when it came to the majors and he'd lose.
     
  7. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne Banned

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    I agree. I could not imagine that a true professional like Laver would not try to give his best when playing a major.

    Their achievements in the 1970s in majors are a certain blame in Laver's career and a plus in Rosewall's.

    It's really astonishing that Laver did not reach a big SF while older Rosewall reached 10 of them.
     
  8. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    You don´t dominate the regular events the way he did ( he also beat Borg in WCT tournaments) and lose so big time at the majors without a very good reason.Specially when you come out of the most succesful single season any player any time has had.There must be something else, and I cannot find other explanation...than that provided by Laver himself.
     
  9. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    A certain player called Patrick Proisy reached a major final and a major semi.Cliff Richey and Roger Taylor played several major semis...and Laver all of a sudden is unable to get past the quarters against players he´s roundly beaten in 69?
     
  10. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne Banned

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    Maybe you and others are right that this case is a riddle not yet solved.
     
  11. Limpinhitter

    Limpinhitter Legend

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    Maybe you're on to something. An international conspiracy, perhaps.
     
  12. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    I'll use an example:

    1969 US Open R16: Rod Laver def. Dennis Ralston (6-4, 4-6, 4-6, 6-2, 6-3)
    1970 US Open R16: Dennis Ralston def. Rod Laver (7-6, 7-5, 5-7, 4-6, 6-3)

    This is what I meant by Laver finding a way to win tough matches in the majors in the 1960s, and then losing that nack in the majors in the 1970s.
     
  13. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne Banned

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    Good example. Another one could be the 1972 WCT Finals. Laver usually beat Rosewall in the previous years (and in the same also)
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2012
  14. hoodjem

    hoodjem G.O.A.T.

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    Once one has climbed Everest, is there really much motivation to go back and do it again?
     
  15. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    Probably the Soviet bloc didn´t want Australia become a worldwide threat.Their bet on Kodes turned out a wrong one since the czech hated them.
     
  16. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    That is my point, too.
     
  17. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    That is the difference between being hungry and being fed up.
     
  18. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    If Laver really wanted to win an event in the 70´s, it was clearly WCT finals.He saved what was left of motivation for that.
     
  19. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    1969 was just an unforgattable year with 3 milestones in mankind .

    1/Laver won the open slam
    2/Led Zeppelin was formed
    3/ some guy put his feer on the moon
     
  20. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    David Bowie arrived with Space Oddity ;)
     
  21. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    Mets and Jets won the big titles:)
     
  22. Limpinhitter

    Limpinhitter Legend

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    Mario Andretti became immortal.
     
  23. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Laver had some wrist problems that contributed to his five-set loss at the '68 USO to Cliff Drysdale. Don't know whether he still had these problems in the 70s, but here's a report on the Drysdale match, from the New York Times.

    Laver lost 4-6, 6-4, 3-6, 6-1, 6-1 in the R16.

    Yesterday, Laver’s normally strong serve deserted him. He faulted 79 of 139 first serves, a 43 per cent first-service ratio and hardly a statistic worthy of a Wimbledon champion.....

    Drysdale’s chances improved as Laver’s first serve deteriorated. In the first three sets, he managed 43 of 93 first serves. But in the fourth set, he missed 14 of 18 and in the fifth set 15 of 28....

    His 14th double-fault of the match came at deuce in the final game. Drysdale won the match with a forehand return of service placement down the line.

    “My serve was the shot that let me down the whole tournament,” said Laver, who has lost four straight tournaments since returning from a vacation ordered because of persistent wrist problems. “If your confidence lets you down, you can’t do much of anything.”

    Laver refused to use his ailing wrist as an alibi. But friends close to the red-haired Aussi said he has been bothered by the wrist and that complications arising from a match on Monday with Pancho Segura forced Laver to change his service grip against Drysdale.

    Drysdale, 27 years old, beat Laver with consistency. Using an aluminum racquet he tried for the first time only five days ago, the South African drilled his two-handed backhand – or left-handed forehand, whichever you prefer – and concentrated on baseline play. It was an unusual strategy in an era of serve-and-volley tactics.​
     
  24. urban

    urban Hall of Fame

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    Laver had taken a fall on his wrist in the French Pro one week after Wimbledon, and he had to set out out for a while. The wrist injury put more strain on his elbow, so he got a sort of tennis elbow since 1969, which he handled with ice and heat.
     
  25. Moose Malloy

    Moose Malloy Legend

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    nice find.
    43% & 14 df's, wow
     
  26. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Yes you know when Laver loses the last two sets of a five-setter 6-1 and 6-1, something is off.

    It's comparable to his five-setter against Rosewall at the 1970 Dunlop. In that match he served 16 double-faults in 158 service points.

    But Laver won that one, partly because he made 51% of his first serves.
     

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