Why poly?

Discussion in 'Strings' started by B.B., Mar 25, 2013.

  1. B.B.

    B.B. Rookie

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    I have tried poly and hybrids but I like an ordinary synthetic gut the best.

    Except for feeling like dead plastic and being harder to break- what´s the benefit of poly vs synthetic gut?

    I don´t get it, please teach me.
     
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  2. BHiC

    BHiC Rookie

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    Polyester is unquestionably not for everybody, and is probably detrimental for a lot of people. However, reasons that people (myself included) play with polyester include increased durability and the potential for more spin. For fast string breakers it makes sense to play with polyester because it will last longer. Poly is also helpful for people that are looking for and able to utilize added spin.
     
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  3. SJSA

    SJSA Semi-Pro

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    Poly is for spin, control, and a baseline player.
     
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  4. ricki

    ricki Professional

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    If you are good enought that you break syngut in 30 minutes, It will force you to use poly anyway
     
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  5. Korso

    Korso Semi-Pro

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    I find a lot more spin and control with poly than synthetic gut.
     
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  6. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    OP. Like me, you prefer a syngut. No worries.
     
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  7. corners

    corners Legend

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    1. Durability
    2. Spin (+10-25% over syngut)
    3. Control. Less deflection of strings, more consistent rebound angle.
    4. Spin control. More spin means increased ability to hit higher over the net and still have the ball land inside the baseline.
    5. Lower power. Slightly slower rebound speed, combined with increased spin potential, allows strong players to swing faster, generating more speed and spin, and still keep the ball inside the lines.
    6. Strings snap back into place and appear to never move. This provides more consistency, as the strings are never stuck out of place leaving big gaps that might result in a weird rebound. It's also convenient as you don't have to straighten strings.

    But as others have said, if you're not breaking syngut then there's no point to a poly.
     
    #7
  8. Muppet

    Muppet Hall of Fame

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    Topspin brand got me with their half-reels. They are a very good value. I tried Cyber Blue first, but I found that in the mains, it would cause me to hit long on serves, overheads, and high volleys. So I tried Cyber Flash mains, but lately it has been playing too powerful for polite mixed doubles. Too good?

    I like to be able to optimize the feel and power of my racquets with poly/multi hybrids. Tensions come into play as well, of course. Two of my racquets do well with hybrids and two of them respond best to full setups. My fifth racquet is an old, flexible mid and seems to do best with full multi.

    I've been trying other polys along the way as well, but Cyber Flash 1.25 seems to be the one. I just got a set each of Iontec and Iontec Black in 1.25. For a synthetic gut, I really like Dunlop S-gut 16. I like Hexy Fiber 16 for a cross string.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
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  9. ultradr

    ultradr Hall of Fame

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    +1.

    Poly is such a advantage nowadays. It is borderline cheating, IMHO.
     
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  10. tkoziol

    tkoziol Rookie

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    Poly is great for getting lots of spin. Also, you can get away with string in the 40's or 50's which is easy on the arm (though the string isn't). Durability isn't too bad either (depends on the poly).
     
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  11. B.B.

    B.B. Rookie

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    Thanks for the input.

    I strung my frame at 44 pounds so I don´t break that many strings:)

    Consider myself having good techniuqe (or how you spell it) and my sliced back hand almost dosen´t bounce:)

    My game is versatile: Looping heavy top spin forehand, aggresive sliced back hand, sometimes I go for a one handed backhand full throttle. My bomb shots are flat though, when I try to win a piont with a winner from the baseline.

    Well maybe I should give it a go again.

    I train top ranked 14-16 old girls (in my country) and they just look at me strangley when I suggest them trying syn gut. Don´t think they know what it is, guess they haven´t heard of it (god I´m getting old).

    Well any suggestions of a full bed multifillamnet or poly at low tension that will boost my spin even more?
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
    #11
  12. fgs

    fgs Hall of Fame

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    poly provides more spin and control for a topspin-centered game. but this basically only qualifies it for only 15% of poly-users. a lot of people play poly for a completely wrong reason - durability (in the sense of months).
     
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  13. tkoziol

    tkoziol Rookie

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    Agreed, durability is best in kevlar strings.
     
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  14. Nickac

    Nickac New User

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    I like it for Increased control. I can pretty much take full cuts at the ball and it stays in. As long as you have good form though
     
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  15. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    Poly is only good under certain conditions (these are all my own opinions, not necessarily fact):

    1. You have to string it tight enough. Rule of thumb is 10% less than where you string syn gut. If you string syn gut @ 65 lbs, then string poly at around 58 lbs. If you go too low, you cease to get the benefits that poly has to offer.

    1a. A caveat of 1. is that your arm has to be able to handle that tension. Poly is very stiff, a lot of amateurs can't handle the stiffness of the string. If you can't string it @ the tension that is most beneficial, then its a waste of a string job.

    2. The benefits of poly help those with good form, fast racquet head speed and good footwork.

    2a. People that find a benefit with poly usually can destroy those in their own field with regular old syn gut. But poly gives them that little extra push which puts them on an even playing field with those that are slightly better than them.

    2b. So you have to ask yourself: how good are you? What's your record? How hard to you hit the ball? How fast can you swing the racquet and still keep it in?

    3. Most people who:
    a. do not have fast racquet head speed
    b. do not have good footwork
    c. form is still lacking
    ... benefit significantly by using nylon strings over poly.

    4. The best indicator of your need for poly is going up against someone of equal to or greater skill as yourself. If you're not ready for poly, then when you're really "pushed to the limit" of your abilities, poly will hurt your game. It will require more from you than you are ready to give.

    For example: played a match this weekend (singles) and began the match with my APD w/ full bed Tourna BHB7 17 @ 48lbs. Lost first set 6-1, couldn't keep the ball in play. No control whatsoever. 2nd set, was down 3-1 before I dropped that racquet, grabbed my backup APD with full bed multi and went on to win.

    Moral of the story: I, a middling 3.0, am not ready for poly yet. When I'm pushed to the limit, my strokes aren't there. Poly is a liability.

    Hope this helps :)
     
    #15
  16. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

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    What poly did you try before? I recommend a softer poly. Dunlop Black Widow 18, Tecnifibre Black Code 1.20, Volkl Cyclone 1.20 or Kirschbaum Pro Line II 1.15. A stiffer but still comfortable poly is Wescannon TurboTwister 1.18.

    Or try hybridizing a poly with your synguts!
     
    #16
  17. sixone90lover

    sixone90lover New User

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    I just bought redcode 16 and bi phase 16 ehat would u recomend to string it at? I hit with only topspin lol very hard to id rake nylon in like two hours so im trying poly now. Ive played with it before in a purestorm and loved it i rarely hit out .... Im thinking mabye 50s?
     
    #17
  18. TierOneSportsOfficial

    TierOneSportsOfficial New User

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    B.B. when you play with synth gut or a multi strings you probably experience that the strings have difficulties going back to its original position, especially if you hit with a lot of top spin. If you choose the right co-polyester string you will see that this string will look like brand new even after playing for 3 hours with heavy spin.

    Lab research supports the idea that the snapping back of the string to its original position (recoil) is that what increases the spin potential. And some poly strings are very good at that. One of our competitor's strings from Solinco called Tour bite has excellent recoil. We offer a string called Durafluxx with similar qualities in that regard.

    Of course, for chronic string breakers polys have the advantage of lasting longer than a synth gut string. Also, if you don't like the dead plastic feeling of a poly but still want to benefit from its positive characteristics you might want to string your racket as a hybrid using a multi string like Biphase, Xcel, (or in our case Triumph) in the crosses and a poly string in the mains.

    Since you mentioned working with junior players this could be a great way for the to transition from synth gut to poly during the time the arm is still weaker and not yet fully developed.
     
    #18
  19. gmatheis

    gmatheis Hall of Fame

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    give a ful bed of tourna big hitter blue rough 17g a try ... I love it and it's pretty cheap.
     
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  20. Rogael Naderer

    Rogael Naderer Semi-Pro

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    Breaking strings is a measure of tennis ability? How come Federer isn't breaking them every match?:confused:





    Stupid comment.
     
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  21. Hi I'm Ray

    Hi I'm Ray Hall of Fame

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    What?

    ........................
     
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  22. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    The big advantage to poly is spin potential.

    When I first used Luxilon ALU power, the increase in spin was a revelation. Balls that I'd normally hit long were spinning into the court. I could swing harder and the result was more spin and less depth. What I didn't like was how quickly the poly dropped tension and died, but I had a good understanding of why so many of the pros use a full string-bed of poly or as part of hybrid.

    Poly did not give as nice of a feeling on volleys, but not as bad as I expected. I now string with Topspin Cyberflash which gives me a good balance of spin, economy, and tension maintenance.

    If you hit flat, mostly slice, or don't take a big cut at the ball, it is likely that you won't like or benefit from poly. If you hit hard topspin, you most likely will notice the difference in action on the ball when using poly as compared to synthetic gut or multis.
     
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  23. B.B.

    B.B. Rookie

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    Thanks so much for all thoughts on this.

    I have come to the conclution that I´m a syn gut guy.

    Strung my new Dunlop biomemetic 200 tour at 47 pounds with cheap normal syn gut and it is just fantastic.
     
    #23
  24. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    Actually, how frequently you break your string is probably good of a indicator as any on whether or not you would benefit from playing with poly. If you don't break it often (say, 10 to 20 hours at most), you don't have enough racquet speed or spin to get the full benefit.

    Pros switch racquets after pre-planned number of games. Which is why you don't see them breaking strings during a match.
     
    #24
  25. SJSA

    SJSA Semi-Pro

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    You may consider higher tensions for syn gut to get good control.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2013
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  26. Rogael Naderer

    Rogael Naderer Semi-Pro

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    Sarcasm detector not working today?

    I agree with your comments above, just not that breaking nylon strings is an indicator of ability.
     
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  27. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    You and me both...

    While I don't have an ultra-modern game, I like to hit with enough spin to keep the ball down on the court when I rip it. Multi's get too mushy for me unless they're strung too tight, but the polys I've tried in a couple of hybrids haven't been helpful either. Syn gut in either 16 or 17 gauge has been right for me - easy to dial in both tension and feel, and I string my own frames, so the cost is also quite civilized.

    I also go to the net a lot and the poly hybrids I've sampled were too dead for me up there. With the right tension in my syn guts, I get a crisp feel along with enough liveliness to keep me quite happy. I don't suffer from any arm issues, but I find improved feel and a mildly more arm-friendly ride with the thinner syn gut, too.

    I'll probably noodle with one or two hybrids this spring - curious to try a multifiber main/poly cross layout just because... Since I string for some friends and students, I stock some reels and lately I've been getting very good results with Tecnifibre's syn gut. Gosen OGSM 16 has been a decent cross with poly mains for those who ask for a poly hybrid.

    Bigger hitters may certainly benefit from a poly, but the right syn gut at the right tension has treated me quite well.
     
    #27
  28. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    Sorry, your sarcasm is just too subtle for me...

    Breaking strings quickly IS an indicator of how much abuse the string goes through. And since hitting with a lot of topspin and power is the most likely way to shorten the life of the stringbed, you can deduce how hard and fast a person swings just by looking at string breakage frequency.

    This does not mean that that person is automatically a 4.5-5.0 player, for all we know that person is hitting the back curtains every time. It could also be that the player is a highly skilled serve and volleyer or a very flat hitter. But we CAN deduce that person hits a pretty hard heavy ball just from the string breakage frequency.
     
    #28
  29. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    Syn gut has lasted me about 4 hours of hitting the last few string jobs, and I love the way it hits. I'm only a 4.5 player, but with my arm injuries I don't see the need for the "extra" spin. :razz:

    -Fuji
     
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  30. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    String breakage frequency tells you whether or not it is worthwhile to switch to poly, not whether or not you have to.
     
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